Decision review: Art class (includes sketches)

As part of my resolution to spend more on learning, I went for one-on-one art classes in a nearby studio (Pamela Dodds’).

My first exercise was to draw shoes with lots of soft lines. The teacher said to focus on drawing each line in relation to each other instead of thinking about the whole shape. That makes it easier to defamiliarize yourself and draw what you see, instead of this preconceived notion of a shoe. I ended up making this shoe a little shorter than it actually was, but it was recognizably a shoe, hooray!

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My homework was to draw more shoes.

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Since I’m curious about translating abstract concepts to concrete images and vice versa, my teacher also suggested that I draw different kinds of shoes and the ideas associated with them.

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The second class focused on negative space and chairs. On the left, you can see the chair I drew in class. On the right, here’s a chair that Leia (one of our cats) often likes sleeping in.

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The third class was about lines, angles, and proportions. I started by drawing the scissors, then drawing the detergent bottle, and then finally by drawing the overlapping shapes of the coffee mugs.

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At home, I practised by drawing the salt-and-pepper shakers, and by drawing the mouse.

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My last session was one about faces and proportions (see above). Both of these were drawn from (rather odd-looking) mannequins. I like the profile likeness, although it was a little difficult getting the hang of the chin.

I’ve read many art education books such as Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain and Drawing by Seeing, so that sped up the teaching and gave us a shorthand for discussions. For me, the art classes were more of a meditative space where I could deliberately practise techniques, with feedback from a teacher who could warn me when I was getting too close to the paper (and thus shifting my viewpoint) or who could figure out where I was a little bit off in terms of proportions.

It’s a very different style of drawing compared to sketchnotes. I’m usually just focused on getting the gist of an idea across in a very simple, iconic form. In terms of getting better at sketchnoting, I’ll focus on broading my visual vocabulary by sketching different terms of concepts instead of focusing on drawing more realistic images. Still, it was fun discovering that even though I hadn’t been practising much “proper” drawing, I was getting better at seeing things!

Decision review: Good decision to experiment with art class, although I’ll keep looking around for other classes and I’ll keep practising on my own.

5 responses to “Decision review: Art class (includes sketches)”

  1. sathish says:

    Curious to know what software you use for sketching. I am trying to get started with simple sketches, wondering if you had any suggestions ? Wacom/Bamboo… ?

    1. Sacha Chua says:

      The sketches there were done with pencil and paper. For my other sketchnotes, see Paper, Tablet, and Tablet PC: Comparing tools for sketchnoting. Hope that helps!

  2. mjhn says:

    I need help drawing

    1. sachac says:

      What have you tried so far, and where are you getting stuck? If you’re curious about sketchnoting, these resources may be helpful: http://sachachua.com/blog/2013/08/resources-for-getting-started-with-sketchnoting/ (You can probably tell from my sketches that I’m not into fine art, so if that’s what you’re looking for, try Google! =) )

  3. mjhn says:

    I need help

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