Category Archives: cooking

Various cooking-related notes

Posting them since I want to be able to find them again someday, and because it’s good to bring scattered ideas together once in a while.

2015-03-08c Getting better at cooking -- index card #cooking

2015-03-08c Getting better at cooking – index card #cooking

In terms of organization: we now have an index-cards-and-magnets kanban on the fridge door, tracking three states: “Get groceries for”, “Cook”, and “Eat”. Seems okay so far, but time will tell if we stick with it. =) Still have to work through more of the raw ingredients in the freezer. Lots of new recipes and food types, though!

2015-05-27c Getting better at cooking -- index card #kaizen #cooking #learning

2015-05-27c Getting better at cooking – index card #kaizen #cooking #learning

It’s fun to break skills down into smaller aspects I can work on. I’m working on knowing what kinds of tastes I like, which involves both trying out new recipes and tweaking the ones that we have.

2015-05-05d Flexible cooking -- index card #cooking

2015-05-05d Flexible cooking – index card #cooking

Speaking of waste reduction and flexibility, it’s nice to slowly accumulate a stock of recipes that can accommodate odds and ends. =)

2015-05-04d Chicken chicken chicken -- index card #cooking

2015-05-04d Chicken chicken chicken – index card #cooking

Our rotisserie is getting lots of use. Yum!

2015-04-28d Japanese curry combination -- index card #variety #meal-planning #cooking #japanese

2015-04-28d Japanese curry combination – index card #variety #meal-planning #cooking #japanese

I sometimes plan using the five-colours, five-ways method from Japanese cooking. Curry is surprisingly colourful (brown beef, green peas, yellow potatoes, red carrots, white rice). Omu-rice is colourful too. Nice to have these dishes!

2015-01-26 Shepherd's pie -- index card #cooking

2015-01-26 Shepherd’s pie – index card #cooking

Also nice and colourful.

2015-02-05 Biscotti -- index card #cooking #baking

2015-02-05 Biscotti – index card #cooking #baking

I’m pretty comfortable making biscotti now. Eventually I’ll work my way through the supermarket snacks aisle. ;)

2015-05-25b Japanese cheesecake -- index card #cooking

2015-05-25b Japanese cheesecake – index card #cooking

Yummy! So nice and fluffy. Uses much less cream cheese compared to the classic Philadelphia cheesecake recipe on the box of cream cheese. I like both types.

2015-03-16e Decision - Slow cooker -- index card #decision #cooking

2015-03-16e Decision – Slow cooker – index card #decision #cooking

Still no slow cooker, since simmering things on the stove works out fine for us and we don’t need its timing capabilities.

It’s starting to feel like summer, so it’s a good time to eat fruits, leafy vegetables, and salads. Looking forward to exploring more tastes and recipes!

Tech and the kitchen

I think I spend most of my time in the kitchen: cooking, tidying up, or simply hanging out. It’s the room with the most light in the house, so it’s easy to just pull up a chair and write or draw at the kitchen table.

There’s been decades of buzz around smarter kitchens – fridges that track and reorder groceries, gadgets that enable new cooking methods. Still, it’s been a little easier for me to imagine tech’s application to sewing than to cooking (at least in our household. I think it’s because we deliberately try to avoid cluttering our kitchen with the endless stream of gadgets sold in stores, on television, and now the Internet: from the “It slices! It dices! It even juliennes!” mandoline, to spiral slicers, to even workhorses like the slow cooker.

2015-04-28c Gadget trade-offs in the kitchen -- index card #tech-and-home #technodomesticity #tradeoffs #gadgets #kitchen #cooking #decision

2015-04-28c Gadget trade-offs in the kitchen – index card #tech-and-home #technodomesticity #tradeoffs #gadgets #kitchen #cooking #decision

It seems that innovations in tech and the home tend to cluster around:

  • the kitchen: cooking, eating, organizing, stocking
  • entertainment
  • automation, sensing, and control: thermostats, lights, energy consumption
  • sleep, health, exercise
  • working from home

Mmm. In terms of the kitchen, where do I want to explore? This might not overlap with where most of the startups are focusing on. Divergence can be quite interesting.

2015-04-28b Tech and the kitchen -- index card #tech-and-home #technodomesticity #kitchen #cooking

2015-04-28b Tech and the kitchen – index card #tech-and-home #technodomesticity #kitchen #cooking

Hmm… There’s a lot of interest around meal planning, but maybe I can play with the specifics of it. I’ve been working on building more variety by focusing on five colours and five ways, following a thread I found in a few Japanese cookbooks. (And five tastes – that’s another level I want to figure out =) ) It might be interesting to graph several of our favourite combinations, and then cycle through them as I add more variety.

2015-04-27e Imagining meal planning -- index card #cooking #planning #variety

2015-04-27e Imagining meal planning – index card #cooking #planning #variety

I wonder how I can build a tool to help me visualize and plan these things… I could probably get Emacs to display an Org Mode table with the current selections, previous meals, and possibilities, or I could do something more graphical with a web page and SVGs or Javascript. First I need to think of how I want to see it…

Japanese curry at Hacklab, curry udon at home

We were planning to make roasted cauliflower for the Hacklab open house dinner, but the cauliflowers were CAD 4.50+ each. Instead, we made vegan Japanese curry (roux recipe), which has become one of my favourite recipes. It’s a great way to cook carrots, potatoes, green beans, daikon, bell peppers, broccoli, mushrooms, peas, and other vegetables you might have.

At home, I made another huge pot of Japanese curry, but with chicken instead of tofu, and with a non-vegan roux recipe. We tried it with udon instead of rice. Udon gives it a chewier texture and it works well too. I also made quickly-pickled cucumber-daikon-carrot salad, which balanced the taste nicely. Not counting the rice, I think the cost per portion worked out to be around $1. (Wow!)

2015-01-24 Curry udon -- index card #cooking

2015-01-24 Curry udon – index card #cooking

J- loves Japanese food, so it’s great to be able to make things at home. Next time, I think I’ll try making udon from flour, water, and salt. It doesn’t require a pasta roller, just patience. On the other hand, frozen udon is around CAD 4 for a pack of five and it takes one minute to cook, so there’s something to be said for that.

2015-01-25 Planning how to level up in cooking -- index card #cooking #learning #plans

2015-01-25 Planning how to level up in cooking – index card #cooking #learning #plans

While I occasionally play with the idea of going on a cooking vacation so that I can try local markets and learn from cooking classes, there’s so much that I haven’t yet explored here. There are all these ingredients I haven’t yet looked up and tried. (Thank goodness for such a diverse city!) Maybe someday I might even try out cooking lessons or private instruction.

For now, I’m focusing on cooking with more vegetables. I liked the balance of meat to vegetables in that curry we made – about three chicken thighs of meat in one of our biggest pots. It would be great to increase vegetable volume and variety. Looking forward to exploring the rest of the produce section.

I also want to remember to cook different things. I have an Org Mode file with recipes, but I haven’t set up scheduled reminders or Org habits for them yet. In the meantime, I’ve put these index cards on our fridge door to remind me when I’m planning groceries:

2015-01-10 Favourite meals -- index card #cooking

2015.01.10 Favourite meals – index card #cooking

2015-01-11 Snacks we can make -- index card #cooking

2015.01.11 Snacks we can make – index card #cooking

Cooking at Hacklab: Coconut barfi

It took me an hour to get from downtown to Hacklab on a stop-and-go Queen streetcar. Next time, I should probably take the King streetcar instead, or even go all the way north to Bloor and then south on the Dufferin bus. Anyway, I’d given myself enough of a buffer to not feel horribly guilty about being late meeting people who were expecting me there around 6-ish anyway, and that was when I made it. Max was already there when I arrived, and Gabriel joined us when we were at the supermarket picking up groceries.

Chris and Alaina were busy making two courses (korma and hot-and-sour soup), so I figured we’d go with an Indian vegan dessert to accompany the korma. Some rapid Googling turned up this Coconut Barfi recipe from Diwali Sweets (by way of Veg Recipes of India’s review). We made a triple batch of the following recipe:

  • 1/2 cup semolina flour (we used medium, but this might be better with fine)
  • 1/2 cup dry coconut flakes (we used shredded)
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cashew pieces (got roasted cashews from the bulk bin so that we could snack on them while cooking)
  • pinch of salt

For the sugar syrup:

  • 1/2 cup ground raw sugar (we used turbinado sugar, couldn’t find anything raw)
  • 3 tablespoons water
  • 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon cardamom powder (we ended up grinding our own, since the nearby supermarket doesn’t stock powdered cardamom)

It took longer to make the sugar syrup than expected, but then again, I’m pretty new to syrup making, so I wasn’t quite sure what “one thread consistency” meant. Anyway, it still turned out as nicely cardamom-scented nibble, crunchy without being jaw-breaking.

Gabriel generously remarked that the amount of salt I added made it remind him of salted caramels. I think perhaps a smaller pinch would do next time.

It was lots of fun cooking with both old friends and new acquaintances, and the kitchen at Hacklab supports having multiple people quite nicely (aside from a bit of stove coordination when we had three things on the go). Yay cooking!

Coconut Barfi recipe

Hacklab Cooking: Thai curry from scratch, and coconut tapioca pudding too

It feels a little odd to post two cooking-related entries in a row, but I wanted to take notes on this (and share it with y’all!). =) Yesterday at Hacklab, Eric, Abtin, and I made Thai curry from scratch, and I made coconut tapioca pudding too. We (mostly) followed this recipe for the Thai curry, tripling the proportions:

Paste (we prepared this in a blender instead of a food processor, and we thinned it with a little coconut milk to make it blendable)

  • 3 Thai chilies
  • 1 stalk lemongrass
  • 3 shallots
  • 1/2 red pepper, deseeded
  • zest of 1 lime
  • stalks from a third of a bunch of coriander
  • thumb-size piece of ginger – we didn’t grate this, we just blended it
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 tsp freshly ground pepper
  • 1 tsp ground coriander

Curry

  • Tofu, marinated in soy sauce, chopped chili, and the juice of 1 lime
  • 400ml coconut milk
  • eggplant
  • zucchini
  • green beans
  • mushrooms
  • half a red pepper, deseeded
  • 1 tsp brown sugar
  • basil

Coconut tapioca pudding

  • Tapioca
  • Coconut milk
  • Sugar
  • Maple syrup

The Fresh.co near Hacklab didn’t carry the kind of tapioca I wanted for the coconut tapioca pudding, so I made do with the minute tapioca that they sell in the instant snacks area (along with Jello and custard powder). I couldn’t figure out how to translate either the coconut tapioca recipe (which specifically tells you to avoid minute tapioca) or the instructions on the back of the tapioca package, so I made something up instead. I used the entire package of minute tapioca, added the remainder of the carton of coconut milk, whisked it to dissolve the tapioca, and cooked it over medium heat (constantly stirring) until the tapioca was no longer crunchy. I added sugar to taste, and I followed the original recipe’s suggestion to top it with maple syrup (… which happened to be the maple syrup that had boiled over during last week’s icing experiment). You’re supposed to let it cool down, but it was yummy while warm anyway. =)

So, more experience points earned and achievements unlocked!

  • First time to make Thai curry from scratch instead of using the canned curry paste
  • First time to cook something with lemongrass
  • First time to make tapioca pudding
  • First time to make up dessert as I went along
  • … First time I’d gone through that much coconut milk

Also, Monday, I made chicken pot pie with a biscuit crust. Technically, I made most of it on Sunday, and then I made a quick biscuit crust after we came back from the polling station (I voted in Canada for the first time, yay!). It was wonderfully chicken-y, not at all like the frozen pot pies you can get at the supermarket. Mmm.

I really like this cooking thing. It’s fun to be able to turn simple ingredients into good tastes, decent food, and shared experiences, even though there’s a lot of figuring things out and adjusting and occasionally making the wrong decisions. =) So far, things have been working out really well.

Cupcake challenge: accepted!

CameraZOOM-20141024194729408

For the Hacklab grand re-opening party, I made 58 vegan chocolate cupcakes using about four batches of this Basic Vegan Chocolate Cupcake. Each batch called for:

  • 1 cup soy milk
  • 1 tsp apple cider vinegar
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/3 cup canola oil
  • 1.5 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup cocoa powder
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt

mixed and baked in a 350F oven for 18-20 minutes (20 minutes at Hacklab). Once cooled, we decorated them with this Vegan Fluffy Buttercream Frosting, which called for:

  • 1/2 cup vegetable shortening
  • 1/2 cup vegan margarine
  • 3.5 cups icing sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup soy milk

Fortunately, Eric had donated an electric mixer (hand), so whipping up the frosting was easy. The cupcakes were not too sweet, so the frosting was a nice balance.

I also made 12 non-chocolate, non-vegan, gluten-free cupcakes from a boxed mix, since some Hacklab members have those dietary restrictions. Eric iced those with a different recipe.

It was actually pretty fun making dozens of cupcakes. Because they’re in liners, it’s easy to make large batches of them and set them cooling on whatever surfaces are handy. I started at 4ish and spent the whole afternoon cooking. I also had fun using the simple cake decoration kit to pipe letters and icing on it, although my hands were a smidge shaky. I actually forgot to add the soy milk and extract the first time around, but I caught it after icing the first ten cupcakes with something that was mostly sugar. After I beat in the soy milk, icing was a lot easier.

We don’t really make a lot of desserts at home because we’d like to eat more healthily, but since J-‘s friends are often over, maybe I should look into making more snacks to keep around the house. Probably not chocolate cupcakes – maybe something healthier? – but it’s definitely baking season, so some kind of baked good. Then again, W- reminds me that a box of cookies on sale is pretty cheap, so we might as well use the time for other things.

I don’t quite remember making cupcakes before the party. Maybe I’ve made cupcakes before, but just forgot about it? Anyway, they’re not intimidating after all. =) And with vegan recipes, I can taste the batter a little to see if I’m on the right track!