Sketched Book – So Good They Can’t Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love – Cal Newport

It seems almost given that you should follow your passion, but what if you don’t know what that is? Or what if following your passion prematurely can lead to failure?

In So Good They Can’t Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love (2012), Cal Newport gives more practical advice: Instead of jumping into a completely unknown field to follow a passion which might turn out to be imaginary, look for ways to translate or grow your existing capabilities. Develop a craftsman’s mindset so that you can improve through deliberate practice. Often it’s not a lack of courage that holds you back, but a lack of skill. As you build career capital, you can develop your appreciation of a field, possibly leading to a clear passion or a mission. You also can make little bets that help you move closer to the cutting edge so that you can make something remarkable. This qualifies you to do greater work that involves creativity, positive impact, and good control.

I’ve sketched the key points of the book below to make it easier to remember and share. Click on the image for a larger version that you can print if you want.

2015-01-03 Sketched Book - So Good They Can't Ignore You - Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love - Cal Newport

I agree with many of the ideas in the book, although I’m not entirely sure about the dichotomy that Newport sets up between passion and craftsmanship. Many of the passion-oriented books I’ve read encourage you to try out your ideas before making major changes to your life – for example, by working on your own business on weekends or by taking a second job. Very few people advocate leaping into the unknown, and if they do, they recommend having plenty of savings and a network of mentors, potential clients, and supporters. So the book comes down a little harshly on a caricature of the other side rather than the strongest form of the opposing side’s argument.

Amusingly enough, although the book describes What Color is Your Parachute as “the birth of the passion hypothesis”, I remember coming across the idea of gradually transitioning to a new field by first exploring something more related to your current one in What Color is Your Parachute, which recommends it as a way of lowering risk and clarifying what you want. I also remember the What Color is Your Parachute book to be less about impulsively following your whims and more about identifying and exploring the skills that gave you feelings of accomplishment.

Anyway, I think you start with curiosity. Then you develop a little skill. This makes you more curious, which helps you learn more, and so on. That–combined with feedback and appreciation–helps fan a spark of interest into a flame. So it’s not really that you start with passion or that you spend many years developing your craft before you can enjoy it, but rather that you gradually figure out both. (I have a feeling this somewhat agrees with what the book would’ve been if it weren’t trying so hard to distinguish itself from advice about passion.)

We just don’t normally express ourselves that way, I guess. It’s almost as if people are expected to either have strong convictions about their life’s work, or to be lost at sea. If you say, “I’m still figuring things out,” it’s like you’re a drifter. If you say, “I’m not passionate about my work right now,” it’s like you’re just going through the motions. I don’t agree with this, which is why I like the book’s emphasis on forming hypotheses about what you want to do, and testing that with little bets that also develop your skills. (This is particularly apropos, since J- will be choosing a university or college course soon.)

Anyway, after reading this book, the specific take-away I’m looking forward to following up on is that of exploring adjacent possibilities more systematically. How can I move closer to the edge of discovery in myself and in the fields I’m interested in, and what new areas have been opened up? I’ve been thinking about designing more focused projects that result in things I can measure and share. That’s similar to the middle layer of the pyramid that Newport suggests:

  1. Tentative research mission – figuring out what you want
  2. One-month exploratory projects with concrete results
  3. Background results

On the whole, the book has a good message. You don’t have to love something to get good at it. Sometimes (often?) getting good at something will help you like it or even love it.

But the book feels a little… uneven, I guess? The anecdotes feel like they’re making too-similar points. The ones about failure feel unsympathetic and hand-picked for straw-man arguments. I imagine most businesses are not started out of the blue because of some grand passion. People prepare, they minimize risk, they work hard. Passion for something – either the work, the customers, or even just the life that’s afforded by the work – pulls them through the toughest parts and keeps them going. Sometimes they succeed for reasons unrelated to their skills; sometimes they fail for reasons unrelated to their passions. Sometimes things just happen. There are everyday businesses that don’t have the creativity, grand positive impact, or full control that are idealized in the book, but that still give people enjoyable lives. I think that the techniques and ingredients described by Newport in his book are good, but they are not essential to an awesome life.

On a somewhat related note, in the past few years, I’ve been learning to let go of the desire for either passion or mastery, Instead, I’m embracing uncertainty and beginner-ness, setting aside time for things I don’t quite love yet. It’s a challenging path, but it tickles my brain. =)

Anyway, if you’re looking for a counterpoint to the usual “Follow your passion!” advice and you want to check out So Good They Can’t Ignore You, you can get it from Amazon (affiliate link) or your favourite source for books. Like this sketch? Check out sketchedbooks.com for more. Feel free to share – it’s under the Creative Commons Attribution License, like the rest of my blog.

Enjoy!

Weekly review: Week ending February 20, 2015

Wow, that was actually a pretty full week: an extended family dinner that required dressing up, technical issues with my work laptop and with my cellphone, cooking, dusting off my sewing things, meeting people, contributing to code… This week, I have a couple of social and family things planned. I’m looking forward to digging into sewing a little more, too, so that I can practise while I remember. =)

2015-02-23b Week ending 2015-02-20 -- index card #weekly

2015-02-23b Week ending 2015-02-20 – index card #weekly

Blog posts

Sketches

Definitely slowed down when I changed my target from five cards a day to one card.

Link round-up

output

Focus areas and time review

  • Business (24.0h – 14%)
    • Earn (10.5h – 43% of Business)
    • Build (11.6h – 48% of Business)
      • Drawing (8.0h)
      • Delegation (0.0h)
      • Packaging (0.6h)
        • Upload to Createspace
      • Paperwork (0.1h)
        • File federal annual return
      • Figure out why library isn’t renewing
      • Fix color detection
      • Fix e-mail relay
    • Connect (1.9h – 7% of Business)
      • Talk to SAP about Quantified Self
      • Attend Sketchnote Hangout
  • Relationships (19.1h – 11%)
    • Help Sean with Emacs
    • Organize get-together with Linda
    • Print tickets
  • Discretionary – Productive (13.2h – 7%)
    • Emacs (6.2h – 3% of all)
      • Host Emacs Hangout
      • Look into bounty for code coverage
      • Set up engines for searching
      • Revise transcript for Magnar Sveen
      • Integrate journal with review
    • Read chapter 3 of Intermediate Japanese
    • Back to sewing!
      • Print out Colette pattern
      • Find 1.5 yards in stash
      • Choose additional fabrics for Sorbetto top
    • Buy Moto G from Staples
      • Set up new phone
    • Read chapter 4 of Intermediate Japanese
    • Review Createspace
    • Investigate Powershell
    • Writing (3.0h)
  • Discretionary – Play (2.8h – 1%)
    • Read synopsis for Die Walkure, watch it
  • Personal routines (35.8h – 21%)
  • Unpaid work (13.5h – 8%)
  • Sleep (59.6h – 35% – average of 8.5 per day)

Emacs: Peer-to-peer coaching is easier when you use impatient-mode to share your buffer

It turns out that coaching someone on Emacs goes really quickly when you can sit side by side. I’ve been helping Sean Miller with Org Mode and Emacs Lisp, with the condition that he has to turn those notes into blog posts. Since he happens to live in the same neighbourhood, this is pretty convenient.

E-mailing snippets back and forth would’ve been tedious, and working on only one of the computers would’ve slowed us down. I remembered Christopher Wellons‘ demonstration of impatient-mode, which lets you display your buffer contents on a web page that automatically updates when you make changes. Here’s what I did:

  1. Install the impatient-mode package.
  2. Call M-x httpd-start.
  3. Configure the firewall to allow incoming connections.
  4. Put the selected buffer into impatient-mode.
  5. Share the link with my IP address (form: http://my.ip.ad.dress:8080/imp/)

Then Sean was able to easily copy text from my screen and try things out on his computer. For example, we dug into org-capture-templates to find out how to create datetree items that were also scheduled on the specified date in the agenda, and we converted his manually-dated headings to include active timestamps so that those would be on the agenda too. It would’ve been a hassle to dictate or re-type the regular expressions, and since we were changing the code rapidly based on our conversation, e-mail would’ve been a hassle. Using impatient-mode worked out well.

What did I like about this two-computer setup? I had access to all my configuration files so that I could easily pick up snippets, and I could demonstrate interesting features as I figured out the code or explained my approach. At the same time, he had access to all of his files and he could take notes in his own buffer. We didn’t have to fuss about with keybindings.

This kind of setup could probably work with a virtual coaching session, too, especially if both people have multiple monitors or if there was an easy way to switch between views.

This is what the webpage looked like:

2015-02-06 11_31_01-sean

Neat, huh?

Intentionally interrupting momentum and limiting flow

You know how when you get going on something, you want to keep going? It’s a great feeling. You’re in the flow, you’re in the zone. Time passes unnoticed. You’re getting stuff done.

I don’t trust that feeling. At least not all the way.

Here’s what got me thinking about this: I had just finished sketchnoting a book. It was fun. I felt accomplished. I wanted to do another sketchnote. In fact, I had already returned the previous book, picked another book from the shelf, and settled in for more drawing.

Then I stopped and asked myself, Is this really what I should be doing next? I was basking in the glow of people’s appreciation on Twitter and I already had all my tools set up for doing the next book, so it made sense to do another sketchnote. But was that really the best use of that moment?

More of the same, or something else?

I still stay up too late programming sometimes. I still spend hours reading. I still write my way past lunch, snapping out of the trance, suddenly starving, late in the afternoon. But I’m getting better at paying attention when part of me pipes up with weird questions.

I dug deeper and found these sub-questions that help me evaluate whether to continue or whether to switch, and what to do next:

  • Am I at the point of diminishing returns or temporary saturation? It’s like the way that if you’re eating your favourite food, there’s a point after which you don’t enjoy it as much. Sometimes giving it a bit of a rest lets you appreciate it more.
  • What could I be neglecting if I focus on this, both in terms of things I need to do and things I want to do? Am I better off spending time with W-, taking care of things around the house, or learning about things that don’t currently give me the same thrill?
  • Is there value in letting this simmer and blend? I can crank out a lot of similar things quickly. Or I can give myself time to learn from people’s feedback and my reflections on process, so that I improve more with each step. Sometimes different things mixed together result in interesting flavours and textures, like the difference between a purée and a stew.
  • It’s easy to do more, but what would enable me to do better? How can I step back and improve the infrastructure for future work? Infrastructure is not exciting, but it’s good to do. It helps to think about specific ways to make something better. What could better mean?
    • Faster?
    • Deeper?
    • Broader?
    • More consistent?
    • More focused?
    • More aligned?
    • More engaging?
    • With better chunking or flow?

Sure, sometimes I’ll lose myself coding or writing or drawing. But sometimes it’s good to interrupt my momentum and ask: What’s important to do, even if it’s not currently as shiny or as fun as what I’m doing?

Do you do this too? What have you learned? What questions do you ask yourself to help you decide what to do next?

Related posts:

Break down what people mean so that you can learn from the specifics

People are vague. You are vague. I am vague. We say things without digging into the details; we often use the first word that comes to mind. This makes sense — otherwise, we’d spend all our time clarifying.

You can learn a lot from digging into things and making them more specific. (… she writes, self-conscious about the use of the vaguest word of all: “things.”)

I’m fascinated by the challenge of understanding what people mean. I realized this while looking at it from two different directions:

  • When someone give an excuse like “It takes too much time,” what’s the excuse behind the excuse, and how can we address that?
  • When someone gives a compliment like “Thank you for sharing an inspiring post,” what kind of inspiring was it, and how can I get better at that?

Let me start with the example of inspiration, because it’s something I want to translate into concrete feedback and action. I thought about the different responses I have to things that inspire me.

2015-01-14 Understanding different types of inspiration -- index card #inspiration #breakdown

2015-01-14 Understanding different types of inspiration – index card #inspiration #breakdown

  • Idea: Inspiration might mean coming across something I didn’t even know I wanted. Now that I know it’s possible, I can work toward it. (This happens a lot with Emacs, which is why I like reading Planet Emacsen)
  • Clarity: Seeing other people who have reached my goals (or who’ve travelled further down the path) helps me understand those goals better. What do I really want? What are some ways I can get there? I can see that more clearly thanks to other people who have illuminated the path. (Talking to executives helped me realize I don’t want to be one.)
  • Alternatives: Inspiration can help me see different ways of doing something. For example, I looked at ways other people coloured their sketchnotes and picked several techniques to try.
  • Beginning: Inspiration can show me that something is less intimidating than I thought it was. It can help me figure out a good place to start and give me the courage to do it. Programming tutorials help me get through the initial challenges of a new framework.
  • Action: Inspiration can move me to act on something. I already know it’s a good idea and I’ve been meaning to do it, but sometimes I need that extra push. Comments with questions and suggestions help me a lot.
  • Perseverance: Sometimes I can feel lost or discouraged. Remembering that other people have dealt with bigger challenges helps me address my anxiety, focus on my goals or my progress, and keep going. Anecdotes are easy to find.
  • Hero worship: I often come across stuff that looks so awesome, I don’t think I could ever do anything like it. This is the type of “inspiration” we tend to get bombarded with. This is the least useful kind of inspiration, I think. It takes a little work to transform it into the kind of inspiration I can use: I need to reflect on what part of it resonates with and how I can incorporate a little of that into my life.

In what ways do I want to inspire others? How can I get better at that?

  • I like inspiring with ideas, playing with what’s possible. I can get better at that by sharing more of these little tweaks.
  • I think out loud in order to help people with clarity. I sketch out the reasons and consequences of my choices so that other people can learn without necessarily having to make all those choices themselves.
  • I explore and summarize alternatives so that people can use that to figure out what might fit them. I can get better at that by researching what other people have done, generating a few new ideas (possibly by combining other ideas), and testing things out so that I can share my experiences.
  • I break things down to help people with beginning. This is why I like addressing the “Yeah, but…”s, the excuses, the things that get in people’s way. This is also why I like sharing ideas, because that can help pull people forward.
  • I’d love to get better at moving people to action. I haven’t given this as much thought yet, but I think it’s the most important.
  • I don’t have much to share in terms of perseverance. I’ve been very lucky.
  • I definitely don’t want to be in the region of hero worship. It creates too much distance and can shut down action.

Breaking a general statement down into more specific statements helps me learn a lot. I ask myself: “What would I or someone say that captures a different aspect of this?” and I write that down. When I split off different aspects, I can understand those aspects better, and I can understand the whole thing better too.

This technique is good to use for excuses, too.

2015-01-14 Breaking down excuses -- index card #excuses #breakdown

2015-01-14 Breaking down excuses – index card #excuses #breakdown

I’m getting better at catching myself when I give an excuse, drilling down with “Why?” and splitting it out into different excuses. (I guess, thanks to my parents’ patience, my inner toddler never stopped asking questions.) Then I can check if those excuses match what’s getting in my way, or if they don’t resonate with me.

A technique I often use is to imagine other people giving those excuses, since sometimes my mind is perfectly willing to ascribe weakness to others even when it gets defensive about itself. ;)

I like sharing these excuses because that might help other people get over theirs. It’s often easier to recognize one of your excuses instead of trying to articulate it yourself. “That’s it! That’s what’s getting in my way!” you might say. Or even if you don’t find something that completely fits, you might find something close, and then you can ask yourself: “What’s missing here?”

For example, what does it mean when someone says something “takes too much time”? What’s really getting in their way? Here are some ideas I came up with:

2015-01-14 What does it mean when something takes too much time -- index card #excuses #breakdown

2015-01-14 What does it mean when something takes too much time – index card #excuses #breakdown

“Too much time” is too vague to address. On the other hand, if you think something takes too much time because you’re trying to do something complicated, you might be able to ask yourself: “What do I really need? Can I get away with doing something simpler?” and then reduce the task to something small enough for you to get started with.

Break things down. Find the statement behind the statement or the excuse behind the excuse, and you’ll have more to work with. Instead of getting frustrated because you can’t come up with one specific answer, come up with lots of them, and then see if you recognize yourself in any of them. Almost there, but not quite? Come up with more answers, maybe combining aspects of the ones you already have. This will not only help you understand yourself, but also understand others–and help others understand themselves and you.

If you find my posts inspiring, would you consider helping me understand more about what kind of inspiration you get and how I can get better at it? If you’re reading this because you recognize one of your excuses in it, would you mind figuring out what your more specific reasons are and what could address them? I’d love to hear from you in the comments below. Thanks!

Experimental Emacs Hangout 2015-02-18

In which we talked about Hydra (0:11), Helm (0:22), packages (0:25), Quelpa/quse-package (0:29), EWW (0:30), Org Mode (0:40), global-flycheck-mode (0:51), widget, TRAMP (1:15), conferences/hangouts (1:26), more Hydra (1:28), Emacs Lisp (1:32), command-history (1:35), Emacs (1:38), plans for getting better (1:44), latexmk (1:49), and other things. (Times are approximate.)

Other questions/comments:

  • Not a question, but I just learned about command-history. Which is a great way to whip up a function. I’m amazed that I just discovered it. – Jonathan Hill
  • I saw something in 24.4 change log about a notification system. Could that maybe solve your problem? – Mitchell Hunter
  • On Air viewers cannot see Sasha due to Sridhar presenting. – Marc Tamsky
  • Anyone using tabs? – Levi Strope

The next Emacs Hangout will be on March 18, 2015, at 8 PM Toronto time (12 midnight GMT) https://plus.google.com/u/0/events/cbj3rg26d8j9ifaiff5uq00ncr4

Want to get notified about upcoming hangouts? You can sign up for notifications at http://eepurl.com/bbi-Ir . We’ll experiment with starting off with a mini-workshop/demo of Org tasks and agenda (or maybe Helm, if that’s more interesting).

Text chat:

JJ Asghar 8:01 PM Russell: http://blog.binchen.org/posts/notes-on-using-gnus.html
Sridhar Ratnakumar 8:01 PM http://www.srid.ca/emacs/
Michael Hoffman 8:03 PM hi sorry i need to hook up my camera
Jason Lewis 8:04 PM https://marmalade-repo.org/packages/winner-mode-enable
Michael Hoffman 8:05 PM brb tech issues
Michael Hoffman 8:07 PM sorry guys looks like my mic isn’t going to work without a reboot sure, thanks so much
Michael Hoffman 8:08 PM can someone repost that gmail/gnus link? that sounded awesome
Sridhar Ratnakumar 8:08 PM http://blog.binchen.org/posts/notes-on-using-gnus.html
Michael Hoffman 8:09 PM thanks Sridhar
Bob Erb 8:09 PM ace-jump-mode
Michael Hoffman 8:12 PM I find `guide-key-mode` very helpful for remembering keybindings as well
Sridhar Ratnakumar 8:13 PM https://github.com/abo-abo/hydra
Michael Hoffman 8:14 PM Sacha can you increase your font siz e? thanks
Michael Hoffman 8:19 PM that’s just an example this is my guide-key setup (require-package guide-key guide-key) (setq guide-key/guide-key-sequence ‘(“C-x” “C-c”)) (setq guide-key/recursive-key-sequence-flag t) (setq guide-key/idle-delay 0.7)
Sridhar Ratnakumar 8:20 PM pretty useful
Michael Hoffman 8:20 PM I don’t see any reason why not to set it up for everything C-x if you set it up with an idle-delay of 0.7 or something then it usually won’t bother you unless you can’t remember
JJ Asghar 8:23 PM ;; i need tab complete (define-key helm-map (kbd “<tab>”) ‘helm-execute-persistent-action)
Sridhar Ratnakumar 8:23 PM thx
JJ Asghar 8:23 PM
Sridhar Ratnakumar 8:23 PM (we are talking about https://github.com/emacs-helm )
Michael Hoffman 8:25 PM has anyone tried the eww web browser it’s definitely a curiosity more than a useful thing
Russell Black 8:25 PM I agree
Michael Hoffman 8:25 PM although i can see cases where it would be useful i keep my .emacs in version control
me 8:26 PM I’ve tried eww a little bit, but I haven’t quite gotten the hang of using it.
Michael Hoffman 8:26 PM i set up a macro to require or install a package
Jacob MacDonald 8:26 PM https://github.com/jaccarmac/quse-package
me 8:26 PM Mostly I just use browse-url to open things in Chrome
Michael Hoffman 8:27 PM ;; XXX: seems to hang when trying to (package-install) at compile time? (defmacro require-package (feature &optional package) “Require FEATURE or `package-install` PACKAGE. Default PACKAGE is FEATURE.” ;; for debugging (message “(require-package %s %s)” feature package) (let ((package (or package feature))) ; XXX: can I have a macro produce multiple forms instead of nesting like this? `(eval-and-compile (eval-when-compile (unless (or (require ‘,feature nil t) (fboundp ‘flycheck-byte-compile-dest-file)) ; don’t run within flycheck (package-install ‘,package))) (require ‘,feature nil t)))) WARNING: does not always work i gotta run guys, this has been great thanks so much sacha
Jacob MacDonald 8:28 PM See ya!
me 8:28 PM Bye, Michael! Oops, missed him
Jacob MacDonald 8:29 PM https://github.com/jaccarmac/dot-emacs-dot-d
me 8:30 PM Hi Howard!
Jacob MacDonald 8:31 PM I used Conkerer for a few months to get the Emacs experience with a decent frontend for JS, etc.
Sridhar Ratnakumar 8:32 PM eww renders images fine; but the layout is not correct
Russell Black 8:32 PM I have to run to an appointment. Thanks guys!
Howard Abrams 8:33 PM Never renders perfectly,. but if you are selective in what you are browsing, it is useful for things like programming documentation that fails to supply a info version.
[email protected] 8:33 PM jittery audio. reconnecting..
[email protected] 8:34 PM i can’t hear anyone
Sod Oscarfono 8:39 PM how about time tracking sacha?
Sridhar Ratnakumar 8:39 PM how many people here already use org-mode?
Jacob MacDonald 8:39 PM I use it primarily for literate programming and a little for note taking.
Sod Oscarfono 8:39 PM i love org-mode! couldn’t live without it
Bob Erb 8:40 PM couldn’t live w/o org-capture – allows mind like water
Sod Oscarfono 8:41 PM sorry no mic or camera here, but that is exactly what i needed thanks Sridhar!
me 8:45 PM Yay!
Sridhar Ratnakumar 8:45 PM Pomodoro org-pomodor
Sod Oscarfono 8:47 PM great stuff thanks Sridhar!
Jacob MacDonald 8:52 PM I’m interested in getting my config to work across multiple OSs. The “correct ” thing to do is to (defvar variable) i believe
Sridhar Ratnakumar 8:52 PM I’m yet to use emacs for git
Jacob MacDonald 8:52 PM It’s like any other linter, you have to prioritize the messages.
Sridhar Ratnakumar 8:53 PM anyone using Emacs 25? apparently supports concurrency
Jacob MacDonald 8:53 PM I build Emacs from Git, so that’s … fun Look at the use-package source .
Bob Erb 8:57 PM (when (memq window-system ‘(mac ns)) (exec-path-from-shell-initialize))
Sod Oscarfono 8:57 PM i just stick to nix based systems so that saves me any hassle there
Sod Oscarfono 9:04 PM you seasoned professionals maybe already know this but i recently discovered the ability to export org to open office docs and pdfs from org: C-c C-e o for open office C-c C-e p for pdf.
Jason Lewis 9:05 PM @sridhar, magit is really nice for using git from emacs
Sridhar Ratnakumar 9:06 PM http://www.srid.ca/emacs/ is generated from C-c C-e h h
Sod Oscarfono 9:10 PM hahaha… there’s an app for that -itis!
Bob Erb 9:11 PM there’s a mode for that
Jacob MacDonald 9:18 PM I’m out. Thanks for the great discussion! I hope to have more to contribute in the future.
Sod Oscarfono 9:18 PM do you key forward also in bash?
Sridhar Ratnakumar 9:18 PM Howard – what font do you use in Emacs, per the screenshot in http://www.howardism.org/Technical/Emacs/literate-devops.html ?
Jason Lewis 9:19 PM https://github.com/adobe-fonts/source-code-pro
Sod Oscarfono 9:25 PM workflow/project and time management/ literate programming. maybe a session where we scrutinize/optimise init files ? we spoke a bit about it already but its always good
Sod Oscarfono 9:30 PM i concur.. thanks sacha
Sod Oscarfono 9:32 PM cut and paste ninja over here.. hahaha
Jason Lewis 9:33 PM I’ve still not managed to make the jump to writing much lisp hope to one day
Bob Erb 9:34 PM URL for Sacha’s book?
me 9:34 PM http://sachachua.com/read-lisp-tweak-emacs
Jason Lewis 9:35 PM cool nice tip thanks
Zachary Kanfer 9:36 PM http://emacsnyc.org/videos.html#2014-06
Howard Abrams 9:40 PM http://www.howardism.org/Technical/Emacs/tao-of-emacs.html
Sod Oscarfono 9:40 PM for those who like sublime style layout i use the graphene starter kit which i think bundles “projectile” … i think.. bad memory sorry… anyways it is now my must have next to org-mode
Sod Oscarfono 9:41 PM i show those people org-mode and that usually gets them interseted
me 9:41 PM Sod: Nice!
Sod Oscarfono 9:42 PM for me the prospect of never having to change screens… ie buffers at will
Sod Oscarfono 9:43 PM yea and just being able to fire up a familiar environment on other systems is super pro
Bob Erb 9:46 PM Cat!
Sod Oscarfono 9:46 PM i’m currently experimenting with desktop publishing from emacs
Zachary Kanfer 9:48 PM my init file: https://bitbucket.org/zck/.emacs.d
Sod Oscarfono 9:48 PM org-mode to pdf to bypass creative cloud / scribus.. but learning latex also. ah thats what i needed to hear cheers jason for sure.. i’m glad i stopped by maybe we also look at where is emacs deficient? can we collaborate on a tool, a bug or whatever. good idea. or we spit out our command history for ideas
Jonathan Hill 9:53 PM I missed all the great suggestions.
Bob Erb 9:56 PM Thank you, Sacha.
Sod Oscarfono 9:56 PM thank you all so much
Jason Lewis 9:57 PM thanks Sacha! bye
Zachary Kanfer 9:57 PM bye! Thanks again, Sacha!