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Sketchnote Lessons: Having fun with words

This entry is part 4 of 11 in the series Sketchnote Lessons

In addition to drawing icons, you can also play with the forms of words in order to make them more fun or visually interesting. Here are some examples. Click on the image to view or download a larger version that you can trace or doodle on, and feel free to share this with others. (Creative Commons Attribution License)

20130909 Sketchnote Lessons - Playing With Words

See http://sach.ac/sketchnote-lessons for the other tips in this series, and check back next Thursday for more!

Series Navigation« Sketchnote Lessons: Adding EmphasisSketchnote Lessons: Arrows and Connectors »

Sketchnote lessons: Stick figures

This entry is part 9 of 11 in the series Sketchnote Lessons

Stick figures are fun to draw. Click on the image to view or download a larger version that you can trace or doodle on, and feel free to share this with others! (Creative Commons Attribution License)

20130904 Sketchnote Lessons - Stick Figures

See http://sach.ac/sketchnote-lessons for the other tips in this series, and check back next Thursday for more!

Series Navigation« Sketchnote Lessons: Drawing EmotionsSketchnote Lesson: Metaphors »

Sketchnote Lessons: Speech bubbles and thought clouds

This entry is part 7 of 11 in the series Sketchnote Lessons

Here’s an assortment of speech bubbles and thought clouds. They’re great for indicating when someone has said something – and there’s always plenty of talking at presentations, panels, and events.

Click on the image for a larger version. Feel free to print this out (or draw on it on your tablet, if you have one)! =)

20130805 Speech balloons and thought clouds

Have fun drawing! Check out my other sketchnote lessons, and e-mail or comment if you have any suggestions/requests!

Series Navigation« Sketchnote Lessons: Banners and ribbonsSketchnote Lessons: Drawing Emotions »

Sketchnote Lessons: Arrows and Connectors

This entry is part 5 of 11 in the series Sketchnote Lessons

You can use use arrows or connectors to guide people through your sketchnote/drawing. Here are some samples:image

For more drawing tips, check out the other sketchnote lessons!

Series Navigation« Sketchnote Lessons: Having fun with wordsSketchnote Lessons: Banners and ribbons »

Sketchnote Lessons: Quick Lettering

This entry is part 1 of 11 in the series Sketchnote Lessons

Here are some examples of different lettering styles that you can try. Some of them (like Chisel or Reverse) may be easier to do digitally than on paper. Click on the image to view or download a larger version, and have fun practicising. Enjoy!

image

I write in print instead of cursive because this is easier to read. Computers seem to be better at understanding printed letters instead of cursive. (I use Evernote to search my notes.) For emphasis, I sometimes use Multiple (draw the same letter twice), or Bold if I can anticipate the need to switch pens.

Got any favourite quick lettering techniques? I’d love to see them! Post links below, or e-mail me at [email protected] .

Series NavigationSketchnote Lesson: Adding color »

Sketchnote Lessons: Banners and ribbons

This entry is part 6 of 11 in the series Sketchnote Lessons

Banners and ribbons are a quick way to emphasize parts of your drawing. Instead of drawing the banner and then trying to fit the text into it, try drawing the text first and then drawing the banner around it. Here’s a step-by-step example.

1. Draw the text with plenty of space around it

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2. Draw a box around the text.

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3. Add two small triangles below the box.

image

4. Draw horizontal lines extending beyond the triangle, and another set of lines the same distance from the top of the box.

image

5. Add a ribbon edge if you want, or use a straight line.

image image

Want to get fancy? Add some shading, add more folds, and so on.

Here are some examples that you can practise with:

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Check out Kevin Dulle’s tutorial for other ways to emphasize things with shadows. Enjoy!

Series Navigation« Sketchnote Lessons: Arrows and ConnectorsSketchnote Lessons: Speech bubbles and thought clouds »