Drush, Simpletest, and continuous integration for Drupal using Jenkins (previously Hudson)

One of my development goals is to learn how to set up continuous integration so that I’ll always remember to run my automated tests. I picked up the inspiration to use Hudson from Stuart Robertson, with whom I had the pleasure of working on a Drupal project before he moved to BMO. He had set up continuous integration testing with Hudson and Selenium on another project he’d worked on, and they completed user acceptance testing without any defects. That’s pretty cool. =)

I’m a big fan of automated testing because I hate doing repetitive work. Automated tests also let me turn software development into a game, with clearly defined goalposts and a way to keep score. Automated tests can be a handy way of creating lots of data so that I can manually test a site set up the way I want it to be. I like doing test-driven development: write the test first, then write the code that passes it.

Testing was even better with Rails. I love the Cucumber testing framework because I could define high-level tests in English. The Drupal equivalent (Drucumber?) isn’t quite there yet. I could actually use Cucumber to test my Drupal site, but it would only be able to test the web interface, not the code, and I like to write unit tests in addition to integration tests. Still, some automated testing is better than no testing, and I’m comfortable creating Simpletest classes.

Jenkins (previously known as Hudson) is a continuous integration server that can build and test your application whenever you change the code. I set it up on my local development image by following Jenkins’ installation instructions. I enabled the Git plugin (Manage Jenkins – Manage Plugins – Available).

Then I set up a project with my local git repository. I started with a placeholder build step of Execute shell and pwd, just to see where I was. When I built the project, Hudson checked out my source code and ran the command. I then went into the Hudson workspace directory, configured my Drupal settings.php to use the database and URL I created for the integration site, and configured permissions and Apache with a name-based virtual host so that I could run web tests.

For build steps, I used Execute shell with the following settings:

mysql -u integration integration < sites/default/files/backup_migrate/scheduled/site-backup.mysql
/var/drush/drush test PopulateTestUsersTest
/var/drush/drush test PopulateTestSessionsTest
/var/drush/drush testre MyProjectName --error-on-fail

This loads the backup file created by Backup and Migrate, sets up my test content, and then uses my custom testre command.

Code below (c) 2011 Sacha Chua ([email protected]), available under GNU General Public License v2.0 (yes, I should submit this as a patch, but there’s a bit of paperwork for direct contributions, and it’s easier to just get my manager’s OK to blog about something…)

// A Drush command callback.
function drush_simpletest_test_regular_expression($test_re='') {
  global $verbose, $color;
  $verbose = is_null(drush_get_option('detail')) ? FALSE : TRUE;
  $color = is_null(drush_get_option('color')) ? FALSE : TRUE;
  $error_on_fail = is_null(drush_get_option('error-on-fail')) ? FALSE : TRUE;
  if (!preg_match("/^\/.*\//", $test_re)) {
    $test_re = "/$test_re/";
  }
  // call this method rather than simpletest_test_get_all() in order to bypass internal cache
  $all_test_classes = simpletest_test_get_all_classes();

  // Check that the test class parameter has been set.
  if (empty($test_re)) {
    drush_print("\nAvailable test groups & classes");
    drush_print("-------------------------------");
    $current_group = '';
    foreach ($all_test_classes as $class => $details) {
      if (class_exists($class) && method_exists($class, 'getInfo')) {
        $info = call_user_func(array($class, 'getInfo'));
        if ($info['group'] != $current_group) {
          $current_group = $info['group'];
          drush_print('[' . $current_group . ']');
        }
        drush_print("\t" . $class . ' - ' . $info['name']);
      }
    }
    return;
  }

  // Find test classes that match
  foreach ($all_test_classes as $class => $details) {
    if (class_exists($class) && method_exists($class, 'getInfo')) {
      if (preg_match($test_re, $class)) {
        $info = call_user_func(array($class, 'getInfo'));
        $matching_classes[$class] = $info;
      }
    }
  }

  // Sort matching classes by weight
  uasort($matching_classes, '_simpletest_drush_compare_weight');

  foreach ($matching_classes as $class => $info) {
    $main_verbose = $verbose;
    $results[$class] = drush_simpletest_run_single_test($class, $error_on_fail);
    $verbose = $main_verbose;
  }

  $failures = $successes = 0;
  foreach ($results as $class => $status) {
    print $status . "\t" . $class . "\n";
    if ($status == 'fail') {
      $failures++;
    } else {
      $successes++;
    }
  }
  print "Failed: " . $failures . "/" . ($failures + $successes) . "\n";
  print "Succeeded: " . $successes . "/" . ($failures + $successes) . "\n";
  if ($failures > 0) {
    return 1;
  }
}

I didn’t bother hacking Simpletest output to match the Ant/JUnit output so that Jenkins could understand it better. I just wanted a pass/fail status, as I could always look at the results to find out which test failed.

What does it gain me over running the tests from the command-line? I like having the build history and being able to remember the last successful build.

I’m going to keep this as a local build server instead of setting up a remote continuous integration server on our public machine, because it involves installing quite a number of additional packages. Maybe the other developers might be inspired to set up something similar, though!

2011-06-09 Thu 09:51

2 Pingbacks/Trackbacks

  • Pingback: Lessons learned from project M | sacha chua :: living an awesome life

  • Pingback: Bookmarks for August 25th through August 29th | Chris’s Digital Detritus

  • http://www.oneshoe.nl JvE

    I did take the trouble to create some nice jUnit xml simpletest output for Jenkins with my patch here: http://drupal.org/node/1330218

  • http://sachachua.com Sacha Chua

    JvE: Yay! =D

  • http://www.heartdriven.com Tom

    We’re succesfully running Cucumber tests against Drupal 7 for acceptance testing for a large project. It’s a bit hard but we got it integrated in jenkinst. I’ll write up my findings in a blog post soon :-)

  • http://www.heartdriven.com Tom

    As promised, I’ve written some articles on my blog about testing against Drupal. We now have a working production environment at the company I work for using Cucumber.

  • http://www.monchacos.com/monchacos Rafa

    Hi Shacha,

    Have you tried to integrate this with Phing?
    There’s documentation here http://groups.drupal.org/node/199978

    • http://sachachua.com Sacha Chua

      I’ve heard of Phing, but I didn’t have an opportunity to look into that last time. Next time I work on a project and implement continuous integration, I’ll check that out. Thanks!