Visual book notes: Mastery (Robert Greene)

Mastery (by Robert Greene) is a book about discovering your calling, creating your own apprenticeship, and building mastery. It lists different strategies you can take, although the strategy names are often esoteric – you’ll need to read the stories in order to figure out what they mean. (Sometimes it feels like cleverness for its own sake.) Anyway, if you do make it through the book, here’s a one-page summary to help you remember parts of it.

2014-04-16 Book - Mastery - Robert Greene

2014-04-16 Book – Mastery – Robert Greene

There are other books on this topic that I like a little more. Cal Newport’s So Good They Can’t Ignore You is more approachable. Still, Mastery was a decent reminder of the value of apprenticeship, and the stories were interesting. I particularly liked the anecdote about Michael Faraday (as in Faraday’s law and Faraday cages), who apparently used sketchnotes to network with Humphry Davy. Faraday took copious, well-organized notes of Davy’s lectures, and gave them to him as a gift. That started a mentoring relationship, and Faraday became Davy’s lab assistant and amanuensis. Some interesting details can be found at http://www.scienceshorts.com/mfarada.htm and http://www.academia.edu/442248/Faradays_Notebooks_the_Active_Organization_of_Creative_Science . I think that picking up yet another historical role model for awesome note-taking made reading Mastery worth it for me. =)