On this page:

Emacs: Working with multiple source trees

As a developer, I often find myself working with multiple trees of source code. Sometimes, I’m comparing the trunk and the branches. Sometimes, I’m copying ideas from one place to another. Sometimes, I’m working on one project and an urgent defect comes in for a different project. With good development environments such as Eclipse, I’d still need to click on the project or directory in order to change my context, and then use a keyboard shortcut to find the resource in that tree.

With an awesome development environment like my customized Emacs, however, I can easily juggle multiple source trees. Here’s the macro I wrote to make setting this up much easier:

(defmacro sacha/file-cache-setup-tree (prefix shortcut directories)
  "Set up the file-cache tree for PREFIX using the keyboard SHORTCUT.
DIRECTORIES should be a list of directory names."
  `(let ((file-cache-alist nil)
	 (directories ,directories))
     (file-cache-clear-cache)
     (while directories
       (file-cache-add-directory-using-find (car directories))
       (setq directories (cdr directories)))
     (setq ,(intern (concat "sacha/file-cache-" prefix "-alist")) file-cache-alist)
     (defun ,(intern (concat "sacha/file-cache-ido-find-" prefix)) ()
       (interactive)
       (let ((file-cache-alist ,(intern (concat "sacha/file-cache-" prefix "-alist"))))
	 (call-interactively 'file-cache-ido-find-file)))
     (global-set-key (kbd ,shortcut)
		     (quote ,(intern (concat "sacha/file-cache-ido-find-" prefix))))))

With that, I can use the following to map C-c p to finding files in my personal directories:

(sacha/file-cache-setup-tree
 "personal"
 "C-c p"
 '("/var/www/html/drupal"
   "~/elisp"
   "~/personal"))

I’ve also set up keyboard shortcuts for the other trees I’m working on.

You’ll need file-cache, ido, and probably something like this:

(require 'filecache)
(require 'ido)
(defun file-cache-ido-find-file (file)
  "Using ido, interactively open file from file cache'.
First select a file, matched using ido-switch-buffer against the contents
in `file-cache-alist'. If the file exist in more than one
directory, select directory. Lastly the file is opened."
  (interactive (list (file-cache-ido-read "File: "
                                          (mapcar
                                           (lambda (x)
                                             (car x))
                                           file-cache-alist))))
  (let* ((record (assoc file file-cache-alist)))
    (find-file
     (expand-file-name
      file
      (if (= (length record) 2)
          (car (cdr record))
        (file-cache-ido-read
         (format "Find %s in dir: " file) (cdr record)))))))

(defun file-cache-ido-read (prompt choices)
  (let ((ido-make-buffer-list-hook
	 (lambda ()
	   (setq ido-temp-list choices))))
    (ido-read-buffer prompt)))
(add-to-list 'file-cache-filter-regexps "docs/html")
(add-to-list 'file-cache-filter-regexps "\\.svn-base$")
(add-to-list 'file-cache-filter-regexps "\\.dump$")

Emacs Gnus: Filter Spam

(draft for an upcoming book called Wicked Cool Emacs)

Ah, spam, the bane of our Internet lives. There is no completely
reliable way to automatically filter spam. Spam messages that slip
through the filters and perfectly legitimate messages that get
labelled spam are all part of the occupational hazards of using the
Internet.

The fastest way to filter spam is to use an external spam-filtering
program such as Spamassassin or Bogofilter, so your spam can be
filtered in the background and you don’t have to spend time in Emacs
filtering it yourself. In an ideal world, this would be done on the
mail server so that you don’t even need to download unwanted
messages. If your inbox isn’t full of ads for medicine or stocks, your
mail server is probably doing a decent job of filtering the mail for
you.

Server-based mail filtering

As spam filtering isn’t an exact science, you’ll want to find out how
you can check your spam folder for misclassified mail. If you download
your mail through POP, find out if there’s a webmail interface that
will allow you to check if any real mail has slipped into the junk
mail pile. If you’re on IMAP, your mail server might automatically
file spam messages in a different group. Here’s how to add the spam
group to your list of groups:

  1. Type M-x gnus to bring up the group buffer.
  2. Type ^ (gnus-group-enter-server-mode).
  3. Choose the nnimap: entry for your mail server and press RET (gnus-server-read-server).
  4. Find the spam or junk mail group if it exists.
  5. Type u (gnus-browse-unsubscribe-current-group) to toggle the subscription. Subscribed groups will appear in your M-x gnus screen if they contain at least one unread message.

Another alternative is to have all the mail (spam and non-spam)
delivered to your inbox, and then let Gnus be in charge of filing it
into your spam and non-spam groups. If other people manage your mail
server, ask them if you can have your mail processed by the spam
filter but still delivered to your inbox. If you’re administering your
own mail server, set up a spam filtering system such as SpamAssassin
or BogoFilter, then read the documentation of your spam filtering
system to find out how to process the mail.

Spam filtering systems typically add a header such as “X-Spam-Status”
or “X-Bogosity” to messages in order to indicate which messages are
spam or even how spammy they are. To check if your mail server tags
your messages as spam, open one of your messages in Gnus and type C-u
g (gnus-summary-show-article) to view the complete headers and
message. If you find a spam-related header such as X-Spam-Status, you
can use it to split your mail. Add the following to your ~/.gnus:

 (setq spam-use-regex-headers t) ;; (1)
 (setq spam-regex-headers-spam "^X-Spam-Status: Yes")   ;; (2)
 (require 'spam) ;; (3)
 (spam-initialize) ;; (4)

This configures spam.el to detect spam based on message
headers(1). Set spam-regex-headers-spam to a regular expression
matching the header your mail server uses to indicate spam.(2) This
configuration should be done before the spam.el library is loaded(3)
and initialized(4), because spam.el uses the spam-use-* variables to
determine which parts of the spam library to load.

In order to take advantage of this, you’ll also need to add a rule
that splits spam messages into a different group. If you haven’t set
up mail splitting yet, read qthe instructions on setting up fancy mail
splitting in “Project XXX: Organize mail into groups”. Add (:
spam-split) to either nnmail-split-fancy or nnimap-split-fancy,
depending on your configuration. For example, your ~/.gnus may look
like this:

(setq nnmail-split-fancy
'(
;; ... other split rules go here ...
(: spam-split)
;; ... other split rules go here ...
"mail.misc")) ; default mailbox

(draft for an upcoming book called Wicked Cool Emacs, more to come!)

Wicked Cool Emacs: BBDB: Use nicknames and custom salutations

I like starting my e-mail with a short salutation such as “Hello, Mike!”, “Hello, Michael”, or “Hello, Mikong!”, but it can be hard to remember which nicknames people prefer to use, and calling someone by the wrong name is a bit of a faux pas. Sometimes people sign e-mail with their preferred name, but what if you haven’t sent e-mail to or received e-mail from someone in a while? In this project, you’ll learn how to set up my BBDB to remember people’s nicknames for you using a custom “nick” field, and to use those nicknames when replying to messages in Gnus or composing messages from my BBDB.

The nickname code worked so well that I started thinking of what else I could customize. It was easy to go from nicknames to personalized salutations. This hack started because one of my friends is from Romania, so I thought I’d greet her in Romanian with “Salut, Letitia!” instead of just “Hello, Letitia!”. The code in this project uses a “hello” field to store these salutations in your BBDB.

To set up personalized nicknames and salutations, add the following code to your ~/.emacs:

(defvar wicked/gnus-nick-threshold 5 "*Number of people to stop greeting individually. Nil means always greet individually.")  ;; (1)
(defvar wicked/bbdb-hello-string "Hello, %s!" "Format string for hello. Example: \"Hello, %s!\"")
(defvar wicked/bbdb-hello-all-string "Hello, all!" "String for hello when there are many people. Example: \"Hello, all!\"")
(defvar wicked/bbdb-nick-field 'nick "Symbol name for nickname field in BBDB.")
(defvar wicked/bbdb-salutation-field 'hello "Symbol name for salutation field in BBDB.")

(defun wicked/gnus-add-nick-to-message ()
  "Inserts \"Hello, NICK!\" in messages based on the recipient's nick field."
  (interactive)
  (save-excursion
    (let* ((bbdb-get-addresses-headers ;; (2)
            (list (assoc 'recipients bbdb-get-addresses-headers)))
           (recipients (bbdb-get-addresses
                        nil
                        gnus-ignored-from-addresses
                        'gnus-fetch-field))
           recipient nicks rec net salutations)
      (goto-char (point-min))
      (when (re-search-forward "--text follows this line--" nil t)
        (forward-line 1)
        (if (and wicked/gnus-nick-threshold 
                 (>= (length recipients) wicked/gnus-nick-threshold))
            (insert wicked/bbdb-hello-all-string "\n\n") ;; (3)
          (while recipients
            (setq recipient (car (cddr (car recipients))))
            (setq net (nth 1 recipient))
            (setq rec (car (bbdb-search (bbdb-records) nil nil net)))
            (cond
             ((null rec) ;; (4)
              (add-to-list 'nicks (car recipient))) 
             ((bbdb-record-getprop rec wicked/bbdb-salutation-field) ;; (5)
              (add-to-list 'salutations 
                           (bbdb-record-getprop rec wicked/bbdb-salutation-field))) 
             ((bbdb-record-getprop rec wicked/bbdb-nick-field) ;; (6)
              (add-to-list 'nicks 
                           (bbdb-record-getprop rec wicked/bbdb-nick-field)))
             (t (bbdb-record-name rec))) ;; (7) 
            (setq recipients (cdr recipients))))
        (when nicks ;; (8)
          (insert (format wicked/bbdb-hello-string 
                          (mapconcat 'identity (nreverse nicks) ", "))
                  " "))
        (when salutations ;; (9)
          (insert (mapconcat 'identity salutations " ")))
        (when (or nicks salutations)
          (insert "\n\n")))))
  (goto-char (point-min)))

(defadvice gnus-post-news (after wicked/bbdb activate)
  "Insert nicknames or custom salutations."
  (wicked/gnus-add-nick-to-message))

(defadvice gnus-msg-mail (after wicked/bbdb activate)
  "Insert nicknames or custom salutations."
  (wicked/gnus-add-nick-to-message))

(defadvice gnus-summary-reply (after wicked/bbdb activate)
  "Insert nicknames or custom salutations."
  (wicked/gnus-add-nick-to-message))

After you add this code, you can store personalized nicknames and salutations in your BBDB. Nicknames and salutations will be looked up using people’s e-mail addresses. While in the *BBDB* buffer, you can type C-o (bbdb-insert-new-field) to add a field to the current record. Add a “nick” field with the person’s nickname, or a “hello” field with a custom salutation. When you compose a message to or reply to a message from that person, the salutation or nickname will be included. If no nickname can be found, the recipient’s name will be used instead.

A number of variables can be used to modify the behavior of this code(1). For example, you may or may not want to greet 20 people individually. The default value of wicked/gnus-nick-threshold is to greet up to four people individually, and greet more people collectively. If you always want to greet people individually, add (setq wicked/gnus-nick-threshold nil) to your ~/.emacs. If you want to change the strings used to greet people individually or collectively, change wicked/bbdb-hello-string and wicked/bbdb-hello-all-string. If you want to store the data into different fields, change wicked/bbdb-nick-field and wicked/bbdb-salutation-field, but note that old data will not be automatically copied to the new fields.

Here’s how the code works. First, it retrieves the list of addresses from the header(2). If there are more addresses than wicked/gnus-nick-threshold, then wicked/bbdb-hello-all-string is used to greet everyone. If not, each recipient address is looked up. If the recipient cannot be found in your BBDB, then the recipient’s name or e-mail address is used(4). If there is a personalized salutation, it is used(5). If there is a nickname, it is used(6). If the person has a record but neither salutation or nickname, then the name of the record is used(7). After all recipients have been processed, the names are added to the message(8), followed by the salutations(9). This function is added to the different Gnus message-posting functions, so it should be called whenever you compose or reply to messages.

You can use BBDB to personalize even more. Check out “Project XXX: Personalize signatures” for more ideas.

Wicked Cool Emacs: BBDB: Keeping track of contact dates

I hadn’t realized just how much I missed my Big Brother Database until today. Three networking events packed into one week meant that I hadn’t set aside enough time for follow up, and I felt my memories of the conversations getting a little hazy. Fortunately I’d taken some notes on my Palm, but I knew I had to get it into some kind of contact management system quickly, and Gmail Contacts just wasn’t compelling enough for me. So it’s back to Emacs, plain text files, and a surprisingly sophisticated contact manager.

I also promised to do some work on the book today, so everything dovetailed nicely.

The following bit of code helps me filter displayed contacts to show only the people I haven’t contacted since a certain date. This is handy for remembering to keep in touch with old friends, for example. Or at least it would be handy if I used it more often and if I actually sent the letters that pile up in my e-mail drafts and my snail mail outbox… but at least it’s a step in the right direction.

If you want to know who you have or haven’t talked to in a while, you need to do two things. First, you need to keep track of when you talked to people. Second, you need to generate reports.

To be able to quickly add contact notes to BBDB records, add the following to your ~/.emacs:

ch6-bbdb-ping.el:

(define-key bbdb-mode-map "z" 'wicked/bbdb-ping-bbdb-record)
(defun wicked/bbdb-ping-bbdb-record (bbdb-record text &optional date regrind)
  "Adds a note for today to the current BBDB record.
Call with a prefix to specify date.
BBDB-RECORD is the record to modify (default: current).
TEXT is the note to add for DATE.
If REGRIND is non-nil, redisplay the BBDB record."
  (interactive (list (bbdb-current-record t)
                     (read-string "Notes: ")
                     ;; Reading date - more powerful with Planner, but we'll make do if necessary
                     (if (featurep 'planner)
                         (if current-prefix-arg (planner-read-date) (planner-today))
                       (if current-prefix-arg
                           (read-string "Date (YYYY.MM.DD): ")
                         (format-time-string "%Y.%m.%d")))
                     t))
  (bbdb-record-putprop bbdb-record
                       'contact
                       (concat date ": " text "\n"
                               (or (bbdb-record-getprop bbdb-record 'contact))))
  (if regrind
      (save-excursion
        (set-buffer bbdb-buffer-name)
        (bbdb-redisplay-one-record bbdb-record)))
  nil)

You can then use z in BBDB buffers to add a quick note to the “contact” field of the current record. The date is automatically noted. You can create a note for a specific date by calling {{C-u wicked/bbdb-ping-bbdb-record}} with a prefix argument. For convenience, the suggested configuration binds this to “z”, because it was one of the few unbound keys I could find. Use this after you meet, call, or e-mail people, and write down a short note about the conversation you had. You might find these notes useful later on.

If you met a number of people at an event in the past and you have Planner installed and loaded, you can use {{planner-timewarp}} to set the effective date to another date. To return to today, use {{M-x planner-timewarp nil}}.

To automatically add a datestamped copy of sent e-mail subjects to people’s BBDB records, add the following to your ~/.gnus:

ch6-bbdb-message-add-subject.el:

(defun wicked/message-add-subject-to-bbdb-record ()
  "Add datestamped subject note for each person this message has been sent to."
  (let* ((subject (concat (format-time-string "%Y.%m.%d")
                          ": E-mail: " (message-fetch-field "Subject") "\n"))
         (bbdb-get-addresses-headers
          (list (assoc 'recipients bbdb-get-addresses-headers)))
         records)
    (setq records
          (bbdb-update-records
           (bbdb-get-addresses nil gnus-ignored-from-addresses 'gnus-fetch-field)
           nil nil))
    (mapc (lambda (rec)
            (bbdb-record-putprop rec
                                 'contact
                                 (concat subject
                                         (or
                                          (bbdb-record-getprop rec 'contact)
                                          ""))))
          records)))
(add-hook 'message-send-hook 'wicked/message-add-subject-to-bbdb-record)

Now that you have the data, how can you use it to filter? Add the following to your ~/.emacs:

ch6-bbdb-show-only-no-contact-since.el:

(defun wicked/bbdb-show-only-no-contact-since (date &optional reverse records)
  "Show only people who haven't been pinged since DATE or at all.
If REVERSE is non-nil, show only the people you've contacted on or since DATE.
Call with a prefix argument to show only people you've contacted on or since DATE."
  (interactive (list
                (if (featurep 'planner)
                    (planner-read-date)
                  (read-string "Date (YYYY.MM.DD): "))
                current-prefix-arg (or bbdb-records (bbdb-records))))
  (let (new-records
        last-match
        timestamp
        omit
        notes)
    (while records
      ;; Find the latest date mentioned in the entry
      (let ((timestamp (wicked/bbdb-last-date
                        (if (vectorp (car records))
                            (car records)
                          (caar records)))))
        (if (if reverse
                ;; Keep if contact is >= date
                (null (string< timestamp date))
              ;; Keep if date > contact
              (string> date timestamp))
            (add-to-list 'new-records (if (vectorp (car records))
                            (car records)
                          (caar records)) t)))
      (setq records (cdr records)))
    (bbdb-display-records new-records)))

(defun wicked/bbdb-last-date (rec)
  "Return the most recent date for REC or nil if none.
Dates should be in the form YYYY.MM.DD.  The first date in the
notes field and the first date in the contact field are used, so
dates should be in reverse chronological order."
  (let* ((wicked/date-regexp
          "\\<\\([1-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]\\)\\.\\([0-9][0-9]?\\)\\.\\([0-9][0-9]?\\)\\>")
         ;; Get the first date mentioned in the notes field
         (notes-date
          (or (and (string-match wicked/date-regexp (or (bbdb-record-notes rec) ""))
                   (match-string 0 (or (bbdb-record-notes rec) "")))
              "0000.00.00"))
         ;; Get the first date mentioned in the contact field
         (contact-date
          (or (and (string-match wicked/date-regexp (or (bbdb-record-getprop rec 'contact) ""))
                   (match-string 0 (or (bbdb-record-getprop rec 'contact) "")))
              "0000.00.00")))
    ;; Compare the two dates
    (or (if (string< notes-date contact-date) contact-date notes-date)
        "0000.00.00")))

To generate a report, use {{M-x wicked/bbdb-show-only-no-contact-since}} and specify the date. These functions are much easier to use with Planner’s date-handling functions. Planner can read dates like “-1″ (yesterday), “-7fri” (seven Fridays ago), “2″ (the second of this month), “1.2″ (January 2 in this year), and “2007.01.02″ (January 2, 2007).

You can also flip the filter by using the universal prefix argument ({{C-u M-x wicked/bbdb-show-only-no-contact-since}}) to show only the people you’ve contacted since a certain date. This is good for knowing the size of your active network. Because the filter works on displayed records, you can combine it to find all the people you talked to last year but not this year. You can also combine it with other filters to find all the people you’ve marked as friends, but who you haven’t talked to in three months. Then you can send a personalized e-mail or make a phone list, and get back in touch. And that’s how you keep track of your contact dates!

Crazy Emacs: Personalized signatures with random taglines

Of course, that naturally leads to the crazy idea: “What if I can
personalize my signatures?” Knowing that Paul Lussier is an Emacs geek, I can reward him for reading all the way
to the bottom of my message… ;)

(defun sacha/gnus-personalize-signature ()
  "Personalizes signature based on BBDB signature field.
BBDB signature field should be a lambda expression.
First person with a custom signature field gets used."
  (let* ((bbdb-get-addresses-headers
          (list (assoc 'recipients bbdb-get-addresses-headers)))
         (records (bbdb-update-records
                   (bbdb-get-addresses
                    nil
                    gnus-ignored-from-addresses 'gnus-fetch-field)
                   nil
                   nil))
         signature)
    (while (and records (not signature))
      (when (bbdb-record-getprop (car records) 'signature)
        (setq signature
              (eval (read (bbdb-record-getprop (car records)
                                               'signature)))))
      (setq records (cdr records)))
    (or signature t)))
(setq-default message-signature 'sacha/gnus-personalize-signature)

So then all I have to do is add the following field to his record:

      signature: (concat "Sacha Chua - Emacs geek
                 What crazy idea can I help you hack next?
                 Random Emacs symbol: "
                 (sacha/random-tagline
                  "~/.taglines.random-emacs-symbols"))

Emacs. One crazy idea at a time. Now I can use this to select random
information, like my favorite networking books or a list of my
upcoming events…

On Technorati: , , ,

Random Emacs symbol: sort-coding-systems-predicate – Variable: If non-nil, a predicate function to sort coding systems.

Crazy idea for Emacs: Random Emacs taglines

Would anyone happen to know of a way to select a random symbol with a
description?

Actually. Hmm.

(progn
  (apropos ".")
  (write-file "~/.taglines.random-emacs-symbols")
  (delete-matching-lines "Plist")
  (delete-matching-lines "not documented")
  (replace-regexp "\n  " " - " nil)
  (delete-non-matching-lines " - "))

Et voila! Random Emacs taglines together with the code:

(defun sacha/random-tagline (&optional file)
  "Return a random tagline and put it in the kill ring."
  (interactive)
  (with-current-buffer (find-file-noselect (or file "~/.taglines"))
    (goto-char (random (point-max)))
    (let ((string
           (buffer-substring (line-beginning-position)
                             (line-end-position))))
      (kill-new string)
      string)))

(defadvice remember (after sacha-tagline activate)
  "Add random tagline."
  (save-excursion
  (goto-char (point-max))
  (insert "\n\nRandom Emacs symbol: "
          (sacha/random-tagline "~/.taglines.random-emacs-symbols")
          "\n\n")))))

On Technorati: , ,

Random Emacs symbol: eshell-remove-entries – Function: From PATH, remove all of the given FILES, perhaps interactively.