Weekly review: Week ending April 14, 2017

We focused on the garden this week, taking advantage of warm weather and a long weekend. We disassembled the old raised bed in the middle of the garden and sifted the soil to remove all those roots. Then we moved the soil to the new 3’x12′ raised bed that W- built out of cedar, mixing in plenty of compost and peat moss. A- loved digging in and crawling over the soil, helping us screen the soil and pick out roots, walking down the backyard while holding on to our hands, and splashing water around when cleaning up. I think it will definitely be worth spending extra time, energy, and money on the garden this year. So many opportunities for sensory play. The size 5 shoes I got her fit pretty well. She spends most of the time barefoot or in socks, though, and the backyard is perfect for that.

I took A- to the ROM when it was rainy. We wandered around the biodiversity gallery. A- was okay with petting the mount of the beaver, but not the beaver pelt that was on the table, and she wasn’t keen on the mount of the raccoon or the snakeskin on the table. She was okay with touching walrus skin, though. It’s neat to have all these textures available. I also caught the museum highlights tour, and I wandered through the Asian ceramics gallery while A- was sleeping.

(A- got her own tour of ceramics and glassware at home thanks to W-, who patiently let her drink out of practically every type of mug or glass we had.)

It’s amazing to see A- learn and connect concepts. This week, she saw W- dip his potato wedges in ketchup before eating them. She promptly insisted on dipping more potato wedges in ketchup and feeding them to us – a two-step process! Dipping also encouraged her to taste a bit of the ketchup, and she dipped some cucumber into my curry too. She recognizes the clothes in the small cloth book, and she uses the book to ask for practice wearing the clothes. She continues to enjoy sprinkling things when we’re cooking. On the flip side, she sometimes resists brushing her teeth, sitting on the potty, or going to sleep. She wants more independence and control, I guess!

She recognizes more vocabulary words, too. “Sleep” often gets a fake snore of acknowledgment from her, even if she’s wide awake and we just mentioned it as part of regular conversation. She knows “lamb” and “giraffe” refer to her stuffed toys. Time to add more word/gesture pairs to our routines.

The parent advocacy workshop session this week focused on special education and working with the school system’s identification, placement, and review committee (IPRC) to create an individual education plan (IEP). My main take-away was that it can be a difficult and intimidating process, so it’s a good idea to bring a support person to the meetings. I found a detailed handout with ideas for accommodations and notes on teachers’ perspectives, too, and I’ll probably reach out to the author to see if I can track down some of the sources.

The early literacy workshop on Thursday was sparsely attended. A- was a little hesitant in the beginning, but she warmed up eventually. She enjoyed taking the books out of the box and putting them back in. Since there weren’t a lot of people around, we took advantage of the opportunity for mutual brain-picking. It was interesting hearing about the facilitator’s experiences raising his kids, especially in terms of helping them learn social skills.

We were slightly under the weather due to sniffles, but we still managed to do things around the house. W- rotisseried two chickens, and I made carrot muffins as a way of getting more vegetables into our lives.

I also did a lot of consulting: analyzing searches, fixing table CSS, copying over old data, and dusting off and completing a half-done change to an organizational visualization.

Next: more gardening!

Blog posts

Sketches

Focus areas and time review

  • Business (3.6h – 2%)
    • Earn (3.6h – 100% of Business)
  • Relationships (0.6h – 0%)
  • Discretionary – Productive (10.8h – 6%)
    • Drawing (1.4h)
    • Emacs (0.2h)
    • Coding (0.5h)
  • Discretionary – Play (0.6h – 0%)
  • Personal routines (19.2h – 11%)
  • Unpaid work (77.0h – 45%)
    • Childcare (63.9h – 38% of total)
  • Sleep (56.2h – 33% – average of 8.0 per day)

2017-04-17 Emacs news

Links from reddit.com/r/emacs, /r/orgmode, /r/spacemacs, Hacker News, planet.emacsen.org, Youtube, the changes to the Emacs NEWS file, and emacs-devel.

Past Emacs News round-ups

2017-04-10 Emacs news

Links from reddit.com/r/emacs, /r/orgmode, /r/spacemacs, Hacker News, planet.emacsen.org, Youtube, the changes to the Emacs NEWS file, and emacs-devel.

Past Emacs News round-ups

Weekly review: Week ending April 7, 2017

My copy of Clinical Ocular Prosthetics arrived. I made an index card of the chapter on practical living tips. It covers mostly the same ground as A Singular View, with the addition of some tips on cleaning the prosthesis and selecting glasses. The illustrations aren’t as nice as the other book, though. I also read the chapter on psychosocial effects and checked out the pictures and profiles included in the book. Looks like it’s a bit of a toss-up: some people can pass off as normal or embrace their situation with a sense of humour, and other people were badly affected by bullying and low self-esteem. I look forward to digging into the more technical chapters.

After some discussion with W-, I’ve signed up for the toddler music classes offered by the Royal Conservatory of Music. I hadn’t been too keen on the other music classes advertised on posters around our neighbourhood, since I wasn’t sure how much value they added beyond the circle times we often go to, playing with music at home, and singing. The RCM classes are part of ongoing research into the neuroscience of early childhood music education, though, so I’m more interested in that than in, say, a franchised program that might be mostly run out of a manual. Rhythm, enjoyment, and ear training seem to be among the things that benefit from early attention, so we’ll give the classes a try.

A- woke up early on Wednesday, so we made it out to the PFLC in the morning. It was so busy, though, and she didn’t relax enough to venture forth. I guess we’re both a little slow to warm up. She felt more comfortable at the JFRC. We went to an early literacy workshop conducted by Dave Page. It was a small group – four babies – and she was the oldest baby there. She was totally fine crawling around, playing with toys, flipping through books, asking for more bubbles, and so on. We chatted about child development and I picked up a few new songs.

Neat language development of the week: A- fake-snores to signal that she’s tired or when she’s prompted by us talking about sleep or bedtime.

Lots of gross motor development, too. She’s been working on standing independently, and can do so for a few seconds if you set her on her feet. She had lots of fun walking on grass, and she even climbed up an inclined mattress. She walked up the stairs with us holding her hands for support.

She likes splashing her feet in the sink and pouring water from one container to another. She leans in to hug her stuffed lamb or our cat. She likes sprinkling herbs and salt when we cook, but don’t ask her to sprinkle cheese on pizza, because she’ll eat it instead.

We went to the ROM and caught the Gems and Gold tour. We also checked out the gallery of Canadian history, which had a section on the Franklin expedition. Their collection of early Canadian furniture was interesting, too. There were a few people walking around while singing – members of a choir on a school field trip, maybe – so it was an unexpectedly wonderful experience.

W- started cleaning up the garden. He disassembled the cage we used to protect the tomatoes and strawberries from squirrels. First step towards making the garden more toddler-friendly!

Lots of posts on my blog, since I took the time to publish a few drafts I had on my phone. A bit of ledger updating too, and time for a few movies.

Blog posts

Sketches

Focus areas and time review

  • Business (3.2h – 1%)
    • Earn (2.5h – 79% of Business)
      • ☑ Earn: E1: 1-2 hours of consulting
    • Build (0.6h – 20% of Business)
      • ☑ [#A] Prepare invoice – State “DONE” from “TODO” [2017-03-01 Wed 02:16]
    • Connect (0.0h – 0% of Business)
  • Relationships (0.0h – 0%)
  • Discretionary – Productive (7.1h – 4%)
    • Drawing (2.6h)
    • Emacs (0.6h)
    • Writing (1.4h)
  • Discretionary – Play (0.8h – 0%)
  • Personal routines (16.0h – 9%)
  • Unpaid work (78.9h – 46%)
    • Childcare (70.1h – 41% of total)
  • Sleep (62.0h – 36% – average of 8.9 per day)

Monthly review: March 2017

W- has been back at work for a little over a month, and we’ve settled into comfortable routines. I focus on A- during the day, and we reconnect with W- when he gets home. After a bit of playtime, we settle down for her afternoon nap. He makes dinner or pulls it out of the fridge, we eat together, and I clean up while he plays with A-. Then we have some more play time before we give A- her evening snack and do our bedtime routines. W- sleeps early so that he can get to work before the morning rush, and I stay up late so that I can have some discretionary time for my own things.

We found out that A- has enamel hypoplasia, so brushing her teeth is a regular part of our routines. I took her to get a new conformer for her eye, and we scheduled the follow-up exams for her liver and heart in August. I didn’t hear back about her blood test results, so I guess her iron levels are fine. I ordered a textbook on ocular prosthetics, too, and I’m excited to read all the medical details. We saw someone from Surrey Place who reassured me that A- will probably be totally all right with monocular vision. Our Healthy Babies Healthy Children nurse went through the 12-month developmental checklists, and our home visitor gave us tips for language development.

In addition to A-‘s health-related appointments, we’ve been filling our days with various parenting workshops and early years drop-ins. I picked up a few tips on school accommodations and visual routines from the Let’s Get Started series, and I’ve also been enjoying the parent advocacy workshop. We’ve been regularly going to the Junction Family Resource Centre and the Parenting and Family Literacy Centre, and we made it out to the JFRC’s sensory play day too. I took A- to the High Park zoo, and we’ve started a new habit of going to the Royal Ontario Museum. (Sometimes with other people!) I find spending time with her to be surprisingly enjoyable, and I’m looking forward to helping her learn.

A- has been learning a lot about language. She added more variety to her babbling: nai, ha, pa, da, and ga. She now recognizes words for a few body parts (head, knees, toes, belly button), mittens, socks, and “all done.”

She’s also been working on her motor skills. She can crawl up and down stairs with supervision, although she usually needs a reminder to go down legs first instead of taking the direct approach. She likes practising taking off and putting on jackets, socks, and mittens with help. She’s interested in chopsticks, spoons, forks, whisks, and measuring cups. She eats crackers and bits of bagels. She pushes toys along while crawling. She can usually connect 2×2 pieces of Duplo if they’re facing the right way. She enjoys sprinkling rock salt and herbs on things we’re cooking.

It’s a lot of fun spending time with A-, and I’ve been thinking about how to share that experience with my parents. After lots of planning, we decided it’s best to hold off on flying to the Philippines until W- can come along. In the meantime, we’ve been doing video chats. She’s still getting used to their faces and voices, but it’s a good first step.

Speaking of family, I took some time to make a GEDCOM export of A-‘s family tree, taking advantage of the data entered by my mom and by W-. Might be interesting for her later, so it’s good to have a personal copy instead of relying on a web service to continue. I also set up Owncloud and borgbackup to improve my backup routines, and I finally set up a VM that makes it easy to confirm if my blog backups work. (They do. Whew!)

Lots of baking this month: a few iterations of roast potatoes, blondies, muffins, and cabbage rolls. We got the roast potatoes down pat, but there seems to be some variability in the quality of russet potatoes we get, so we’re looking into that too.

The new routines have been working out pretty well for discretionary time. I’ve been focusing on small improvements and personal tasks instead of increasing my consulting workload. The backups I mentioned above had been on my list a long time! I also did preliminary tax prep, although we’re still waiting for J- to do her numbers so that she can transfer tuition tax credits to W-. I sorted out my Ledger, learned the new features in ledger-mode, and added net worth and stock allocation reports. In the process, I discovered an unpaid invoice and got payment, yay! In terms of consulting, I deployed some code to add priorities and categorization, and I helped with an add-on that I’ve turned over to the other team. I even had time to watch a couple of movies.

If the rest of the year is much like this month, I think it’ll be pretty good! :)

Blog posts

Sketches

Time

Category Feb March Diff h/wk Diff h/wk
Unpaid work – Childcare 41.0 44.3 3.3 82.2 5.5
Unpaid work 48.3 50.6 2.3 94.0 3.9
Discretionary – Productive 2.2 3.2 1.1 6.0 1.8
Discretionary – Social 0.3 0.6 0.4 1.2 0.6
Business – Build 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.3 0.1
Business – Connect 0.0 0.0 -0.0 0.0 -0.0
Business – Earn 0.9 0.8 -0.0 1.6 -0.1
Discretionary – Play 1.0 0.8 -0.2 1.6 -0.3
Discretionary – Family 1.5 0.5 -1.0 1.0 -1.6
Personal 9.9 8.7 -1.2 16.2 -2.0
Sleep 35.9 34.3 -1.6 63.7 -2.7

Emacs: Pasting with the mouse without moving the point – mouse-yank-at-point

W- has been taking notes in Org Mode in Emacs, despite being a long-time Vim user. He likes org-indent’s virtual spaces over the way the Vim plugin for Org inserts actual spaces, and evil-mode provides a reasonable compromise in terms of keyboard shortcuts. I have been successfully resisting the urge to overwhelm him with tips. :)

He mentioned that he was thinking of going back to Vim because of one little thing he couldn’t get used to: mouse pasting behaviour. In vim in a Linux console, pasting with middle-click puts the text where the point is, no matter where you click. In Emacs in a GUI, middle-clicking moves the point and then pastes, so you have to be more careful about clicking where you want the text to go. I hardly ever use the mouse to paste, since C-y is more convenient for me, but everyone’s got their own workflow.

To make sure he didn’t feel any pressure from me to continue with Emacs, I nodded and suggested a few note-taking things he might try if he went back to the Vim world, like using pandoc to convert his Org Mode notes to Markdown. But Org Mode is awesome, so out of curiosity, I searched for “emacs don’t move point middle click”, which led me to a StackExchange answer, which had the exact thing we needed. W- added the following line to his ~/.emacs.d/init.el:

(setq mouse-yank-at-point t)

Now middle-clicking pastes at the current location instead of moving it. Yay!

I think it’s awesome that at some point, someone decided to make that configurable, and someone asked about it and someone else answered, and all that can be found with the words I used. Yay community!