Tweaking my daily routines for that feeling of progress

I found myself feeling like I hadn’t gotten a lot of things done. My weekly reviews showed me I made progress, but it didn’t feel like it day to day. I thought about what I’d like to feel instead.

2015-05-04c Keeping the end of the day in mind -- index card #life #quality-of-life

2015-05-04c Keeping the end of the day in mind – index card #life #quality-of-life

A little structure helps me do useful things even if my mind is fuzzy.

2015-03-11d How can I structure these types of days -- index card #limbo #routines

2015-03-11d How can I structure these types of days – index card #limbo #routines

I’ve been experimenting with this more now that I’m regularly up around 7 or 8 AM. I seem to have developed a routine that works well for me. I start by having breakfast and reading a book. Then I usually spend an hour or two coding, slowly working my way through my personal project task list. If I want to explore a thought, I spend a little time drawing. Lunch is followed by (or preceded by) playing video games. Then it’s time to draw or write a bit more. Sometimes I nap in the afternoon.

2015-06-09a Designing my mornings -- index card #kaizen #mornings #life

2015-06-09a Designing my mornings – index card #kaizen #mornings #life

If I sit down to read or code, even if I don’t feel like doing so in the beginning, I often find myself getting into it. I know that after I read or code, I’ll have something to add to my daily index card journal, so the rest of the day feels more relaxed. If I keep track of the tiny steps I take – each book, each finished task – I know they’ll add up to a surprising distance during my weekly or monthly reviews.

2015-06-08c What could make this even awesomer -- index card #life #kaizen

2015-06-08c What could make this even awesomer – index card #life #kaizen

I’d been wondering what could give me a good sense of progress in a self-directed life, and this might be the start of an answer. Even if I feel a little lost in other areas, it’s nice to know that I’m a bit further ahead than when I started.

It might be nice to make writing more habitual, since I tend to do it in spurts. It’s easiest for me to write about code, but it might also be useful to write about how I’d like to apply what I’m learning from books or about life. Besides, writing is a good way to organize my thoughts and drawings into larger chunks.

I think I’ll add walking into this routine, too. Maybe in the afternoon, so that I can return the book that I just finished and I can pick up any holds that have come in.

Hmm…

Using Emacs Org Mode tables to calculate doses to buy

I got tired of manually calculating how many I needed to buy based on a daily protocol and how many I had in stock, so I wrote a little bit of Emacs Lisp to figure it out. You can specify the type, daily dose, start and end dates (inclusive; defaults to the last specified date if blank), and how many you have in stock.

First, define a table of this form, and give it a name.

#+NAME: input
| Type         | Per day |      Start |        End | Stock |
|--------------+---------+------------+------------+-------|
| Medication A |       2 | 2015-06-09 | 2015-06-16 |     5 |
| Medication B |       1 |            |            |     0 |
| Medication C |     0.1 | 2015-06-12 | 2015-06-16 |   0.2 |
Type Per day Start End Stock
Medication A 2 2015-06-09 2015-06-16 5
Medication B 1 0
Medication C 0.1 2015-06-12 2015-06-16 0.2

To call the code from the bottom of this post, use something like:

#+CALL: calculate-meds-needed(meds=input) :hlines yes :colnames yes
Type Total In stock Needed
Medication A 16 5 11
Medication B 8 0 8
Medication C 0.5 0.2 1

Here’s the code that processes it:

#+name: calculate-meds-needed :var meds=meds :colnames yes :hlines yes
#+begin_src emacs-lisp
(let (start end)
  (append
   (list (list "Type" "Total" "In stock" "Needed"))
   (list 'hline)
   (sort (delq nil (mapcar
                    (lambda (row)
                      (unless (or (eq row 'hline) (string= (elt row 0) "Type"))
                        (let (total)
                          (setq start (if (string< "" (elt row 3)) (elt row 3) start)
                                end (if (string< "" (elt row 2)) (elt row 2) end)
                                total (* (elt row 1)
                                         (- (calendar-absolute-from-gregorian (org-date-to-gregorian start))
                                            (calendar-absolute-from-gregorian (org-date-to-gregorian end))
                                            -1)))
                          (list
                           (elt row 0)
                           total
                           (elt row 4)
                           (max 0 (ceiling (- total (elt row 4))))))))
                    meds)) (lambda (a b) (string< (car a) (car b))))))
#+end_src

Adding calculations based on time to the Org Agenda clock report

Duplicating this answer on my blog in case StackOverflow goes away. =)

Leo asked:

I’m trying to make the Agenda Clockreport show how many pomodoros I’ve invested in a task. A Pomodoro is 25 minutes. For example, 1:15 hours of work is 3 pomodoros.

I’m trying to customize org-agenda-clockreport-paramater-plist, and I would like to extract “Time” and convert it to a pomodoro. I.e., (time in minutes / 25) = pomodoro.

I wrote:

This will create a column in your clocktable report that sums the hours from columns 3 and 4, and then another column that shows you the round number of pomodoros that took up.

(setq org-agenda-clockreport-parameter-plist
      '(:link t :maxlevel 2 :formula "$5=$3+$4;t::$6=ceil($5*60/25);N"))

If you don’t want in-between columns, here’s a totally hackish approach:

(defun my/org-minutes-to-clocksum-string (m)
  "Format number of minutes as a clocksum string.
Shows the number of 25-minute pomodoros."
  (format "%dp" (ceiling (/ m 25))))
(fset 'org-minutes-to-clocksum-string 'my/org-minutes-to-clocksum-string)

Alternatively, you can use :formatter, but the formatting function looks very long and annoying to change.

Leo eventually configured it with:

(setq org-agenda-clockreport-parameter-plist
 '(:fileskip0 t :link t :maxlevel 2 :formula "$5=($3+$4)*(60/25);t"))

(He didn’t mind the decimals, I guess! =) )

Weekly review: Week ending June 5, 2015

Another week of taking it easy. My energy was up and down, but manageable. Also, lots of rain this week, including one time I ended up walking home in a downpour. Squish, squish, squish…

I learned how to use Javascript and Tasker together, and I’ve been having fun playing with that. I think I’ll look into developing Android applications next. Tasker+JS will let me quickly prototype ideas, and then I can code those ideas into applications that might be faster or more reliable.

I might be getting the hang of this. =)

2015-06-08a Week ending 2015-06-05 -- index card #journal #weekly

output

Blog posts

Sketches

Link round-up

Focus areas and time review

  • Business (19.5h – 11%)
    • Prepare invoice – State “DONE” from “STARTED” [2015-05-01 Fri 09:23]
    • Earn: E1: 1-2 days of consulting
    • Earn (6.9h – 35% of Business)
    • Build (11.2h – 57% of Business)
      • Drawing (2.9h)
      • Paperwork (1.7h)
    • Connect (1.4h – 7% of Business)
  • Relationships (9.2h – 5%)
  • Discretionary – Productive (8.4h – 4%)
    • Emacs (0.0h – 0% of all)
    • Add to my TFSA
    • File prescription receipts
    • Process Quantified Self Toronto videos
    • Shift my bond allocation
    • Writing (7.0h)
  • Discretionary – Play (36.4h – 21%)
  • Personal routines (25.8h – 15%)
  • Unpaid work (12.9h – 7%)
  • Sleep (55.9h – 33% – average of 8.0 per day)

Recreating and enhancing my tracking interface by using Tasker and Javascript

I got tired of setting up Tasker scripts by tapping them into my phone, so I looked into how to create Tasker interfaces using Javascript. First, I created a folder in Dropbox, and I used Dropsync to synchronize it with my phone. Then I created a simple test.html in that folder. I created a Tasker scene with a WebView that loaded the file. Then I started digging into how I can perform tasks, load applications, and send intents to Evernote so that I can create notes with pre-filled text. I really liked being able to reorder items and create additional screens using Emacs instead of Tasker’s interface.

Here’s my code at the moment. It relies on other Tasker tasks I’ve already created, so it’s not a standalone example you can use right off the bat. Still, it might be useful for ideas.

tasker-scripts/test.html:

<html>
    <head>
        <title>Sacha's personal tracking interface</title>
        <style type="text/css">
         button { padding: 20px; font-size: large; width: 45%; display: inline-block  }
        </style>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.11.3.min.js"></script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="feedback"></div>
        <!-- For making it easy to track things -->
        <div class="screen" id="main-screen">
        <button class="note">Do</button>
        <button class="note">Think</button>
        <button class="note">Note</button>
        <button class="note">Journal</button>
        <button class="switch-screen" data-screen="track-screen">Track</button>
        <button class="switch-screen" data-screen="play-screen">Play</button>
        <button class="switch-screen" data-screen="eat-screen">Eat</button>
        <button class="switch-screen" data-screen="energy-screen">Energy</button>
        <button id="reload">Reload</button>
        </div>
        <div class="screen" id="play-screen">
            <button class="play">Persona 3</button>
            <button class="play">Ni No Kuni</button>
            <button class="play">Hobbit</button>
            <button class="switch-screen"
                    data-screen="main-screen">Back</button>
        </div>
        <div class="screen" id="energy-screen">
            <button class="energy">5</button><br />
            <button class="energy">4</button><br />
            <button class="energy">3</button><br />
            <button class="energy">2</button><br />
            <button class="energy">1</button><br />
            <button class="switch-screen"
                    data-screen="main-screen">Back</button>
        </div>
        <div class="screen" id="eat-screen">
            <button class="eat">Breakfast</button>
            <button class="eat">Lunch</button>
            <button class="eat">Dinner</button>
            <button class="switch-screen"
                    data-screen="main-screen">Back</button>
        </div>
        <div class="screen" id="track-screen">
            <button class="update-qa">Routines</button>
            <button class="update-qa">Subway</button>
            <button class="update-qa">Coding</button>
            <button class="update-qa">E1 Gen</button>
            <button class="update-qa">Drawing</button>
            <button class="update-qa">Cook</button>
            <button class="update-qa">Kitchen</button>
            <button class="update-qa">Tidy</button>
            <button class="update-qa">Relax</button>
            <button class="update-qa">Family</button>
            <button class="update-qa">Walk Other</button>
            <button class="update-qa">Nonfiction</button>
            <button class="update-qa">Laundry</button>
            <button class="update-qa">Sleep</button>
            <button id="goToWeb">Web</button>
            <button class="switch-screen" data-screen="main-screen">Back</button>
        </div>
        <script>
         function updateQuantifiedAwesome(category) {
             performTask('Update QA', null, category);
             hideScene('Test');
         }

         function showFeedback(s) {
             $('#feedback').html(s);
         }
         function switchScreen(s) {
             $('.screen').hide();
             $('#' + s).show();
         }

         $('.switch-screen').click(function() {
             switchScreen($(this).attr('data-screen'));
         });
         function createEvernote(title, body) {
             sendIntent('com.evernote.action.CREATE_NEW_NOTE', 'activity',
                        '', '', 'none', '', '',
                        ['android.intent.extra.TITLE:' + (title || ''),
                         'android.intent.extra.TEXT:' + (body || '')]);
         }
         $('.note').click(function() {
             createEvernote($(this).text());
         });
         $('.energy').click(function() {
             createEvernote('Energy', 'Energy ' + $(this).text() + ' ');
             switchScreen('main-screen');
         });
         $('#reload').click(function() {
             performTask('Reload Test');
         });
         $('.update-qa').click(function() {
             updateQuantifiedAwesome($(this).attr('data-cat') || $(this).text());
             hideScene('Test View');
         });
         $('#goToWeb').click(function() {
             browseURL('http://quantifiedawesome.com');
         });
         $('.eat').click(function() {
             updateQuantifiedAwesome($(this).text());
             loadApp('MyFitnessPal');
         });
         $('.play').click(function() {
             performTask('Play', null, $(this).text());
         });

         switchScreen('main-screen');

         </script>
    </body>
</html>

You can find the latest version at https://github.com/sachac/tasker-scripts.

Thinking about simplifying capture on my phone

I’ve been thinking about temporary information: things like where I put down something I was holding, the task I’m working on just in case I get interrupted, thoughts that I want to explore later on.

The seeds of a good system are there, if I learn how to use them more effectively. I usually have my phone handy. Evernote can record audio, pictures, or text, and the creation date is an automatic timestamp. I can export the notes and process them using Emacs. Google Now’s “Note to self” command can create a note in Evernote, or I can tap the Create Note icon.

How can I improve how I use these tools?

If I get used to starting my note lines with a special keyword, then it’ll be easier for me to extract those lines and process them. For example:

DO Actions to add to my to-do list
THINK Thoughts to explore
PLACE Putting things down

If I add custom commands to Google Now, or make Google Now the fallback for another command line, then I can use that for my tracking system as well. AutoShare and AutoVoice might be handy. I should probably learn how to get Tasker working with Javascript, too. Alternatively, I can use Evernote’s e-mail interface, although there might be a slight delay if I’m offline.

If I create a custom single-click interface that can start the note with a specified keyword, that would be even better.

I could also use a more systematic review process. For example:

  • All THINK items can be automatically added to the end of my

questions.org as their own headings.

  • All DO items can be added to my uncategorized tasks.

Okay, let’s start by figuring out Javascript and Tasker, since that will make it easier for me to write actions that take advantage of intents.

First step is to save the JS library template from Tasker. The file is stored in /storage/emulated/0/Tasker/meta/tasker.js. Okay, I’ve created a Tasker scene that has a WebView component that loads the file that I synchronized with Dropsync.

The next step is to simplify development so that I can try things quickly. I want to be able to sync and reload my WebView scene by tapping a button. The Dropsync Tasker action returns immediately, so maybe I’ll just add a wait to it.

Hmm, maybe a good path might be:

  1. Set up easy sync/reload, so I can try things out quickly.
  2. Include JQuery.
  3. Run tasks.
  4. Launch apps.
  5. Send intents.
  6. Convert my current tracking menu to this format.
  7. Add buttons for creating notes (either e-mail-based or intent-based):
    • Do
    • Think
    • Place
  8. Add a command-line. Compare using it vs. using buttons.

On a related note, what kinds of things would I like my phone to be smart enough to do?

  • If I’m at home and I’m calling my cellphone from our home phone, set the ring volume to maximum, since that means I’m trying to find it.
  • If I say that I’m at a social event, ask me who I’m spending time with. Track that. Create a note with the person’s name as the title and “social” as the tag.
  • If I’m going to sleep, track that, then start tracking in Sleep as Android.
  • If I’m going to play a game, track that, then ask me what I’m going to do afterwards and how long I want to play. Load hints for the game (if I want). After the specified time, make a sound and remind me of what I was going to do.
  • If I’m going to read a book, show me the list of my checked-out books and let me pick one of them. Track that, then create a note with the title and author so that I can take notes.
  • NFC opportunities:
    • If I scan at the door, show me a menu: walk, subway, groceries, family, bike.
    • If I scan in at the kitchen table, track it as breakfast / lunch / dinner (as appropriate), then launch MyFitnessPal.
    • If I scan in at the table in front of the TV, show me a menu: relax, nonfiction, fiction, games.
    • If I scan in at my bedside table, treat it as going to sleep.

Mmm… Little things to tweak. =)