Category Archives: geek

Emacs microhabit: Switching windows with windmove, ace-window, and ace-jump

When I work with a large monitor, I often divide my Emacs frame (what most people call a window) into two or more windows (divisions within a frame). I like this more than dealing with multiple Emacs frames, even if I could spread those frames across multiple monitors. I find it easier to manage the windows using keyboard shortcuts than to manage the tiling and display of frames.

One of the Emacs micro-habits I’m working on is getting better at switching between windows. When there are only two windows, C-x o (other-window) works just fine. However, when there are three or more, it can take a few repetitions of C-x o to get to where I want. I could get around that by binding other-window to M-o instead, replacing the default keymap for that. Or I could try to get the hang of other ways to move around.

Here’s an 8-minute video showing windmove, ace-window, and ace-jump:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKCKuRuvAOw&list=UUlT2UAbC6j7TqOWurVhkuHQ

Windmove lets you move around with cursor keys, if you set up the appropriate keyboard shortcuts. Ace-window works like ace-jump. In addition, you can use C-u to swap windows and C-u C-u to delete windows. Ace-jump works across windows, so that’s handy too.

Here’s my relevant code snippet for Windmove. I changed this to use define-key instead of bind-key.

(defvar sacha/windmove-map (make-sparse-keymap))
(define-key sacha/windmove-map "h" 'windmove-left)
(define-key sacha/windmove-map "t" 'windmove-up)
(define-key sacha/windmove-map "n" 'windmove-down)
(define-key sacha/windmove-map "s" 'windmove-right)
(define-key sacha/windmove-map "[left]" 'windmove-left)
(define-key sacha/windmove-map "[up]" 'windmove-up)
(define-key sacha/windmove-map "[down]" 'windmove-down)
(define-key sacha/windmove-map "[right]" 'windmove-right)
(key-chord-define-global "yy"     sacha/windmove-map)

Here’s the cheat sheet I made for myself:

2015-01-12 Emacs microhabit - window management -- index card #emacs

2015-01-12 Emacs microhabit – window management – index card #emacs

And here’s a simpler reference that you can personalize with your own shortcuts:

2015-01-18 Emacs microhabit - Switching windows -- index card #emacs #microhabit

2015-01-18 Emacs microhabit – Switching windows – index card #emacs #microhabit

Naturally, after recording the video, I thought of a better way to manage my windows. I took advantage of the def-repeat-command that abo-abo posted on (or emacs so that I could repeat keybindings easily. I modified the function to accept nil as the first value if you don’t want the keymap to run a command by default, and to use kbd for the keybinding definitions.

  (defun sacha/def-rep-command (alist)
    "Return a lambda that calls the first function of ALIST.
It sets the transient map to all functions of ALIST,
allowing you to repeat those functions as needed."
    (lexical-let ((keymap (make-sparse-keymap))
                  (func (cdar alist)))
      (mapc (lambda (x)
              (when x
                (define-key keymap (kbd (car x)) (cdr x))))
            alist)
      (lambda (arg)
        (interactive "p")
        (when func
          (funcall func arg))
        (set-transient-map keymap t))))

Here’s my new binding for yy. It lets me bounce on y to use other-window as normal, use the arrow keys to move between windows thanks to windmove, and use ace-window as well: h is the regular ace-window, s swaps, and d deletes.

(key-chord-define-global "yy"   
      (sacha/def-rep-command
       '(nil
         ("<left>" . windmove-left)
         ("<right>" . windmove-right)
         ("<down>" . windmove-down)
         ("<up>" . windmove-up)
         ("y" . other-window)
         ("h" . ace-window)
         ("s" . (lambda () (interactive) (ace-window 4)))
         ("d" . (lambda () (interactive) (ace-window 16)))
         )))

Neat, eh?

Emacs kaizen: helm-swoop and editing

This entry is part 2 of 4 in the series Emacs Kaizen

Continuing on this quest to focus on one tiny little workflow change at a time, so that I can get even better at using Emacs…

One of those packages I installed but never got around to trying out was all, which lets you interactively edit all lines matching a given regular expression. It’s like an editable occur, sorta.

It turns out that helm-swoop lets you use C-c C-e to edit matching lines interactively (so you can use keyboard macros or replace-regexp or whatever). You can type C-x C-s to save it back to the buffer.

On a related note, I’m still tickled pink every time I use dired-toggle-read-only (C-x C-q) to make a Dired buffer editable so that I can batch-rename filenames.

Visualizing the internal citation network of my blog

I’m curious about the internal citation of my blog. Which thoughts have been developed over a long chain of posts? Which posts do I often link to? Where are there big jumps in time? Where have I combined threads?

2014-12-03 Internal citation network

I’ll probably need to build my own data extractor so that it can:

  • ignore weekly and monthly reviews, since I link to everything in those,
  • reconcile short and long permalinks, redirection, and sneak previews,
  • and maybe even index my sketches and look at follow-ups

and I’ll probably want to create something that I could eventually plot as an SVG or imagemap using Graphviz, or maybe analyze using Gephi.

It would be super-interesting to create some kind of output that I could fold into my blog outline or into individual posts. I would need a static dump for that one, I think.

How would I build something like this? One time, I used Ruby to analyze the text of my blog. That might work. I might be able to pull out all the link hrefs, do lookups…

As of Dec 3, 2014, there are 87 posts in 2014 that link to previous posts, out of 259 non-review posts (so roughly 34%). I used this SQL query to get that:

SELECT post_title FROM wp_posts WHERE post_content LIKE ‘%<a href=”http://sachachua.com/blog/20%’ AND post_date >= ‘2014-01-01′ AND post_title NOT LIKE ‘%review:%’ AND post_state=’publish';

Hmm. I might even be able to do some preliminary explorations with Emacs and text processing instead of writing a script to analyze this, if I focus on 2014 and ignore the special cases (short permalinks, redirection, and sneak previews), just to see what the data looks like. Rough technical notes:

perl -i -p -e s/href/\nhref/gi 2014-manip.html
grep http://sachachua.com/blog/20 2013-manip.html > list-2013
perl -i -p -e "s/(<\/a>(<\/h2>)?).*/$1/gi" list-2013
(defun sacha/misc-clean-up-reviews ()
  (interactive)
  (while (re-search-forward "\\(Monthly\\|Weekly\\) review: .*</h2>" nil t)
    (let ((start (line-beginning-position)))
      (re-search-forward "</h2>")
      (delete-region start (line-beginning-position))
      (goto-char (line-beginning-position)))))

(defun sacha/org-tabulate-links ()
  (interactive)
  (goto-char (point-min))
  (let (main-link edges nodes)
    (while (not (eobp))
      (if (looking-at "^href=\"\\(.*?\\)\".*?</a></h2>")
          ;; Main entry
          (progn
            (setq nodes (cons (match-string 1) nodes))
            (setq main-link (match-string 1)))
        (if (looking-at "^href=\"\\(.*?\\)\"")
            (setq edges (cons (concat 
                               main-link  ;; from
                               "\t"
                               (match-string 1)   ;; to 
                               ) edges))))
      (forward-line 1))
    (kill-new (mapconcat 'identity edges "\n"))))

Ooooh. Pretty. Gephi visualization of the edge list formed by links, using the Yifan Hu layout. That big thread in the middle, that’s the one about taskmasters and choice and productivity, which is indeed the core theme running through this year of the experiment. The cluster on the right is a year in review. We see lots of little links too.

Internal links for entries posted in 2014

Internal links for entries posted in 2014

Now I’m curious about what happens when we add the posts and links from 2013 and 2012, too. I’ve colour-coded this by year, with It ties together posts on sketchnoting, blogging, choice, learning, writing, plans… Neat.

blog-graph

 

What does this say? It says that even though I write about lots of different things, there are connections between the different topics, and the biggest tangle in the middle has more than 320 nodes. I have lots of blog posts that build on an idea for three or four posts, sometimes spanning several years, even if I don’t think about it in advance. There are 90 such clumps, and it might be good to revisit some of these 2- and 3-post chains to see if I can link them up even further.

Also, it could be interesting to do this analysis with tags, not just year. Hmm… Also, I should dust off my data structures and algorithms, and make my own connected-component analyzer so that I can get a list of the clumps of topics. Good ideas to save for another day!

Developing Emacs micro-habits: Abbreviations and templates

When it comes to improving how you use Emacs, picking one small change and paying close attention seems to work well. Little things make a lot of difference, especially when frequently repeated over a long period of time. It reminded me of this quote I came across on Irreal:

I’ve gotten the hang of basic multiple-cursors-mode and I’m making gradual progress towards internalizing smart-parens by the simple approach of focusing on one tiny habit at a time. For example, I spent a week reminding myself to use mc/mark-all-like-this-dwim or mc/mark-lines instead of using keyboard macros.

Inspired by the Emacs Advent Calendar, I wanted to start a 52-week series on micro-habits for more effective Emacs use. I brain-dumped an outline of four sets (basic Emacs, Org, programming, meta-habits) of thirteen small tips each. Looking at my list, I realized there were many ideas there that I hadn’t quite gotten the hang of myself. I figured that this might be more of a project for 2016; in the meantime, I could learn by doing.

The first micro-habit I wanted to dig into was that of automating text: abbreviations, templates, and other ways to expand or transform text. I’d used Yasnippet before. I sometimes accidentally expanded keywords instead of indenting lines if my cursor happened to be at the wrong spot. But I hadn’t yet drilled the instinct of automation or the familiarity with templates into my fingers.

This blog post isn’t the easy-to-understand guide to automating text. I’ll write that later, when I’ve figured more things out. In the meantime, I’ll share what I’ve been learning and thinking so far, and maybe you can help me make sense of it.

Emacs has a separate manual for autotyping, which I had never read before. The short manual covers abbrev, skeleton, auto-insert, copyright messages, timestamps, and tempo. Did you know that define-skeleton lets you create a template that accepts multiple interregions if you call your skeleton function with a negative argument? (Interregions? What are those?) It took me an embarrassing amount of time to figure out how to mark interregions and use them. It turns out they have to be contiguous. It might be easier to think of marking the beginning of the region, marking some points in the middle, and then calling the command when your point is at the end – which is probably how most people would interpret the diagrams, but I was trying to mark discontinuous regions because that would be super-cool, and that totally didn’t work. And then I forgot that using helm-M-x means you need to specify numeric arguments after typing M-x instead of before. (I wrote about that very point in one of my blog posts, but it slipped my mind.) Once I got past that, I was delighted to find that it worked as advertised. I still haven’t imagined a situation where I would use it, but it seems like a good sort of thing to know.

What are the practical situations where text automation can help people work more effectively? I looked around to see how other people were using it. Coding, of course – especially if you use Emacs Lisp to transform the text. Debugging, too. Marking up text. Remembering parameters. Wrapping regions. Writing e-mails. Adding blog post metadata. Citing references. Lifehacker has a long list, too.

I came up with several categories I’m going to focus on so that I can more easily recognize opportunities to work better:

2015-01-05 Seeing opportunities for abbreviations and text automation -- index card

2015.01.05 Seeing opportunities for abbreviations and text automation – index card

  • Abbreviations are about typing long words with fewer keystrokes. For example, you might shorten “description” to desc.
  • Phrases are like word abbrevations, but longer. You might want to be able to expand btw to “by the way.”
  • Code benefits from expansion in multiple ways:
    • Automatically inserting characters that are harder to reach on a keyboard, like { and }
    • Being consistent about coding style, like the way many people like adding a comment after the closing brace of an if
    • Transforming text that shows up in multiple places, such as variable names that need getters and setters
    • Filling in the blanks: parameters, comments, etc.
    • Reducing the cognitive load of switching between languages by establishingq a common vocabulary. For example, I sometimes need to look up the syntax of for or the proper way to display a debugging statement when I switch to a language I haven’t used in a while
  • Templates are also useful for consistency in writing, planning, and other areas
  • Text transformation can save time and minimize error.

2015-01-04 Automating text - index card

2015.01.04 Automating text – index card

Translating the examples I’d seen to my personal interests, I could probably find plenty of opportunities to automate text while coding, debugging, writing, planning, or publishing. To dig deeper, I looked at each of the categories in detail.

Abbreviations

2015-01-06 Abbreviations -- index card

2015.01.06 Abbreviations – index card

When I was curious about typing faster, I read forum posts from people who had increased their speed by developing their own form of digital shorthand. The trick works on paper, too. When I need to write quickly or in limited space, I use abbreviations like bc for “because” and w/o for “without.” Why not on the computer as well?

I often take advantage of dynamic abbreviations when I know I’ve recently typed the word I want. To trigger those, I just have to type the beginning of the word and then use dabbrev-expand. I haven’t set up my own static abbreviations, though. Main obstacles:

  • I want to write shorter words instead of longer ones
  • In the beginning, it’s faster to type the word instead of thinking of the abbreviation and expanding it
  • If I have to undo or backspace, that makes me slower
  • If I burn this into my muscle memory, I might be more frustrated on other computers or in other apps (then again, I already customize Emacs extensively, so I guess I’m okay with the tradeoff)

Anyway, here’s a short list I’m trying out with define-global-abbrev and hippie-expand:

hw however
bc because
wo without
prob probably
st sometimes

Hmm. Let’s say that it takes me two keystrokes to trigger the expansion, whether it’s the xx keychord I’ve just set up or the M-/ I’ve replaced with hippie-expand. (Hmm, maybe a double-space keychord is a good candidate for expansion too.) Is the retraining worth a ~50% possible reduction in keystrokes? Probably not.

How about text with punctuation, so I can minimize reaching for symbols?

blog http://sachachua.com/blog/
mail [email protected]

Maybe it’s better to look at the words I frequently misspell, or that I tend to slow down then typing. I’ll keep an eye out for those.

Phrases

2015-01-06 Phrases -- index card

2015.01.06 Phrases – index card

Phrases are an easier sell. Still, I’m trying not to settle into the rut of set phrases. I should cut those mercilessly or avoid writing them from the beginning.

co check out
iti I think I
otoh on the other hand,
mean in the meantime,
fe for example
fi for instance,
oc of course
ip in particular

Code insertion

This is, fortunately, well-trodden ground. The yasnippet package comes with a large collection of snippets for many programming languages. You can start by familiarizing yourself with the pre-defined snippets for the modes that you use. For example, in my installation, they’re under ~/.emacs.d/elpa/yasnippet-20141117.327/snippets. You can use the filename (or keywords defined with key, if specified) as the abbreviation, and you can expand them with yas-expand (which should be bound to TAB if you have yas-global-mode on).

I mostly work with HTML, CSS, Javascript, Ruby on Rails, and Emacs Lisp, so this is the cheat sheet I’ve made for myself:

2015-01-07 Code insertion -- index card

2015.01.07 Code insertion – index card

For HTML, I need to remember that the tags are generally expandable, and that there are a few Lorem Ipsum abbreviations triggered by lorem.1 through .5. CSS has a v abbreviation that sets up a bunch of rules with vendor prefixes. For Javascript, I’ll probably start with f to define a function and log to output something to console.log. Rails has a bunch of iterators like eai that look interesting. As for Emacs Lisp, the pre-defined templates generally add parentheses around common functions so you don’t have to type them, and there are a few shortcuts like bs for buffer-string and cc for condition-case. I think I’ll modify the default snippets to make better use of Yasnippet’s field support, though, so that I don’t have to delete and replace text.

Templates

In addition to using text expansion for code, you can use it for planning and writing other text. I saw Karl Voit use it to great effect in my Emacs Chat with him (around the 44:00 mark), and I’ve been gradually refining some templates of my own.

2015-01-07 Templates -- index card

2015.01.07 Templates – index card

For example, here’s the template I’ve been using for sketched books. Note: If you use Yasnippet for Org Mode properties, you may want to set yas-indent-line to fixed or the fields will get confused.

Gist: sbook

# key: sbook
# name: Sketched Book
# --

**** TOSKETCH ${1:short title}
      :PROPERTIES:
      :TITLE: ${2:long title}
      :SHORT_TITLE: $1
      :AUTHOR: ${3:authors}
      :YEAR: ${4:year}
      :BUY_LINK: ${5:Amazon link}
      :BASENAME: ${6:`(org-read-date nil nil ".")`} Sketched Book - ${2:$(sacha/convert-sketch-title-to-filename yas-text)} - ${3:$(sacha/convert-sketch-title-to-filename yas-text)}
      :ISBN: ${7:ISBN}
      :BLOG_POST: http://sachachua.com/blog
      :END:

$0

***** TODO Sketchnote $1
:PROPERTIES:
:Effort: 2:00
:QUANTIFIED: Drawing
:END:

[[elisp:sacha/prepare-sketchnote-file][Prepare the file]]

***** TODO Write personal reflection for $1
:PROPERTIES:
:Effort: 1:00
:QUANTIFIED: Writing
:END:

[[http://sachachua.com/blog/wp-admin/edit.php?page=cal][View in calendar]]

****** Sketched Book - $2 - $3

$3's /$2/ ($4) ...

I’ve sketched the key points of the book below to make it easier to remember and share. Click on the image for a larger version that you can print if you want.

Haven't read the book yet? You can [[$5][buy it from Amazon]] (affiliate link) or get it from your favourite book sources.

Like this sketch? Check out [[http://sketchedbooks.com][sketchedbooks.com]] for more. Feel free to share – it’s under the Creative Commons Attribution License, like the rest of my blog.

***** TODO Post $1 to blog
:PROPERTIES:
:Effort: 1:00
:QUANTIFIED: Packaging
:END:


***** TODO Update sketched books collection
:PROPERTIES:
:Effort: 1:00
:QUANTIFIED: Packaging
:END:

1. [[elisp:sacha/index-sketched-book][Index sketched book]]
   - [[file:~/Dropbox/Packaging/sketched-books/index.org][Edit index]]
   - [[file:~/Dropbox/Packaging/sketched-books/ebook.org][Edit ebook]]
2. [[elisp:sacha/package-sketched-book][Compile]]
3. Update [[https://gumroad.com/products/pBtS/edit]]

***** TODO Tweet sneak peek of $1 with attached picture

[[elisp:(progn (kill-new (format "Sneak peek: Sketched Book: %s - %s %s" (org-entry-get-with-inheritance "SHORT_TITLE") (org-entry-get-with-inheritance "AUTHOR") (org-entry-get-with-inheritance "BLOG_POST"))) (browse-url "http://twitter.com"))][Copy text and launch Twitter]]

It’s a lot of code and I keep tweaking it as I come across rough corners, but it’s handy to have that all captured in a template that I can easily expand. =)

Text transformation

One of the advantages of tweaking text expansion inside Emacs instead of using a general-purpose text expansion program is that you can mix in some Emacs Lisp to transform the text along the way. I’m still thinking about how to make the most of this, as you can see from this half-filled note-card:

2015-01-07 Text transformation as part of expansion -- index card

2015.01.07 Text transformation as part of expansion – index card

For example, this snippet makes it easier to share source code on my blog while also linking to a Gist copy of the code, in case I revise it or people want to comment on the code snippet itself. It doesn’t use any of the built-in text expansion capabilities, but I think of it as a text expander and transformer because it replaces work I used to do manually. You’ll need the gist package for this one.

Gist: Sacha (updated to clean up region code)

(defun sacha/copy-code-as-org-block-and-gist (beg end)
  (interactive "r")
  (let ((filename (file-name-base))
        (mode (symbol-name major-mode))
        (contents
         (if (use-region-p) (buffer-substring beg end) (buffer-string)))
        (gist (if (use-region-p) (gist-region beg end) (gist-buffer))))
    (kill-new
     (format "\n[[%s][Gist: %s]]\n#+begin_src %s\n%s\n#+end_src\n"
             (oref (oref gist :data) :html-url) filename
             (replace-regexp-in-string "-mode$" "" mode)
             contents))))

Both Yasnippet and Skeleton allow you to use Lisp expressions in your template. If you don’t have all the data yet, you might consider writing another Lisp function that you can call later when you do. For example, in the sketched books code above, I have an Emacs Lisp link that composes a tweet with a link, puts it in the clipboard, and then opens up a web browser. (I do this instead of posting directly because I also want to attach an image to that tweet, and I haven’t figured out how to modify any of the Emacs Twitter clients to do that.)

So that’s what I’ve learned so far about automating text in Emacs. It’ll take me more than a week to get the hang of the abbreviations I’ve just set up, and I’ll probably need to add even more before adding and using abbreviations become true habits. But hey, maybe this will help you pay closer attention to repetitive text and editing actions in Emacs so that you can automate them too, and we can swap notes on useful abbreviations. What kind of text do you expand?

For more information, see:

Improving my evil plans for Emacs

Mwahahaha. My evil plans are yielding results, or at least that’s the impression I get because I’m learning so much from people who tell me that they found my blog helpful years ago. Even more recent experiments bear fruit: punchagan checked out Memacs because of my Emacs Chat with Karl Voit, and ended up writing a blog post about using the Emacs profiler.

2015-01-17 My Evil Plans for Emacs are yielding results -- index card #emacs #sharing

2015-01-17 My Evil Plans for Emacs are yielding results – index card #emacs #sharing

This makes me curious: What am I doing right, and how can I do it even better?

Looking at my Emacs posts, it seems I mostly write about figuring things out (and occasionally about cool things I’ve come across). People like the enthusiasm, and they sometimes pick up cool ideas too. The Emacs Hangouts and Emacs Chats are my way of working around my limitations; I don’t particularly like travel and I’m not up to organizing in-person meetups, but virtual meetups let me reach out to more people (and we can record the conversations more easily, too).

What are my goals?

  • I want to get better at using Emacs, because it’s useful and it tickles my brain
  • I want to help more people become intermediate and advanced users of Emacs, because then I get to learn from them (and also Emacs thrives as a community). I can do this by:
    • Showing people the benefits and possibilities of customization
    • Working out loud, showing my thought processes and the tools/libraries I use
    • Helping people develop a good mindset and handy skills
    • Sharing little tips and neat functions

How can I get even better at helping the Emacs community?

2014-04-26 Helping the Emacs community #emacs

2014-04-26 Helping the Emacs community #emacs

I really like the way (or emacs has daily Emacs snippets and Rubikitch describes Emacs packages in Japanese. I think I’ll slowly ramp up from once-a-weekish Emacs posts to maybe twice or three times a week. I have more posts already scheduled, but I just spread them out so that my non-geek readers don’t get overwhelmed.

Guides

Because I’m interested in things that tend to be idiosyncratic (workflows, customizations, etc.), I have a hard time making clear recommendations or putting tips into logical order. That’s probably why I do a lot more “thinking out loud”-type posts instead. I can experiment with identifying who might find a tip useful, extract the tips from my thinking-out-loud explorations, and gradually build up sets of related tips that way.

2015-01-16 Hmm – not guides but explorations – index card #sharing #packaging

I did actually manage to put together one guide (How to Read Lisp and Tweak Emacs) and half of another A Baby Steps Guide to Managing Your Tasks With Org. The sketches for How to Learn Emacs and Tips for Learning Org Mode are high-level guides, too.

Microhabits

I’ve been going back to the basics, working on developing even better Emacs microhabits. I’ve focused on two so far: abbreviating text and switching windows.I think there’s plenty of space to improve even in terms of taking advantage of what’s already out there (with minimal configuration along the lines of setting variables and keyboard shortcuts). And then there are even bigger opportunities to improve through customization and Emacs Lisp.

Helping people directly

I’ve mentioned coaching a few times. Bastien Guerry and a few other folks offer coaching as a service. Me, I’m not particularly familiar with the kinds of issues people run into or are curious about (ex: Mac OS X, programming mode setup). I’m mostly curious about workflow, and I’m happy to talk to people about that. It could be a good source of ideas for blog posts.

2015-01-08 Imagining coaching or guiding others -- index card

2015-01-08 Imagining coaching or guiding others – index card

When I ran my Google Helpouts experiments, I turned many of those tips into blog posts. I think that would be even more effective if people wrote up those tips themselves (it’ll reinforce their learning and it will bring them into the community), so I’ve been playing with the idea of strongly encouraging or even requiring write-ups.

2015-01-15 What if I required people to pay it forward -- #workingoutloud #sharing #teaching

2015-01-15 What if I required people to pay it forward – #workingoutloud #sharing #teaching

Unrealistic, but one can dream. Or one can focus on helping people who are already sharing their questions and ideas in blog posts or discussion forums, so that’s another approach. There’s no shortage of questions, that’s for sure.

Hangouts

I like Emacs Hangouts more than one-on-one coaching. Hangouts are public and recorded automatically, so people can learn from them even if no one has posted notes. It’s shaping up to be a wonderful peer-coaching sort of thing, which is good because I don’t have to be so worried about not being able to help at all. I wonder what this would be like with a bit of a mastermind group structure; maybe we each pick a microhabit or idea to work on for the month (or for two weeks), we help each other out, and then we report back at the next one. That way, there’s casual conversation and discovery, but there’s also purpose and motivation.

2015-01-08 Imagining Emacs hangouts - index card

2015-01-08 Imagining Emacs hangouts – index card

2015-01-16 Emacs community -- index card #emacs

2015-01-16 Emacs community – index card #emacs

Connecting with more parts of the Emacs community

Evil-mode users are a growing part of the Emacs community. Maybe I should try it out to get a better sense of what the experience is like for people who are coming into Emacs via evil-mode. Besides, composability might be an interesting mental tool to add to my toolkit.

2015-01-18 Thinking about evil-mode and Emacs -- index card #emacs

2015-01-18 Thinking about evil-mode and Emacs – index card #emacs

Wrapping up

Maybe I can get better at helping the Emacs community by:

  • Focusing on those micro-habits and sharing what I learn (good for helping intermediate users develop a better appreciation of Emacs)
  • Playing with more workflow improvements and sharing them
  • Writing about how to tinker with popular packages like Org
  • Reaching out through blog comments and Emacs Hangouts to help people learn (in a publicly recorded way)
  • Bringing out what people know through Emacs Hangouts and Emacs Chats (especially if people know cool things but haven’t gotten around to writing about them)

Helping me get better at helping the Emacs community (my selfish reason: so that I learn more from people) can also support your evil plans (your selfish reason: so that you can learn more from me and from other people). Any suggestions? Tell me what I’m doing right and should do more of / better at, or tell me about somewhat adjacent things that are easy to do – low-hanging fruit! =)

Thoughts in context: Connecting posts to my blog post index

I’ve been thinking about how to improve the inter-post organization of my blog so that I can write more effectively and so that other people can find things faster. I often link to posts I’ve previously written, but I rarely update old posts to link forward to other related posts. There are quite a few internal linking plugins for WordPress, but they seem more slanted towards SEO and keywords than I’d like.

I wanted to come up with another approach that could take advantage of the big outline of my blog posts at http://sachachua.com/index that I update every month. I’ve found this to be pretty handy for organizing things into finer categories instead of going back and updating lots of posts in WordPress. I can search this easily on my computer by using helm-swoop, and I can move things around using Org Mode.

It got me thinking: Is there a way I can make it easier to connect posts to the index so that if people find an old post useful, they can explore related posts?

So here’s what I came up with: a small See in index link at the end of the post.

2014-12-08 16_45_13-sacha chua __ living an awesome life - Page 2 of 1159 - learn - share - scale

Index link on old posts

Not all the posts are indexed yet, but for those that are, clicking on that link will open up the blog index and scroll it to the right post, highlighting the match, so people can see what else is in the neighbourhood.

2014-12-08 16_45_33-sacha chua __ blog

Matching link

To make this work, I added the following HTML code to my blog index:

<script type="text/javascript">
// from http://www.jquerybyexample.net/2012/06/get-url-parameters-using-jquery.html
function getURLParameter(sParam)
{
    var sPageURL = window.location.search.substring(1);
    var sURLVariables = sPageURL.split('&');
    for (var i = 0; i < sURLVariables.length; i++)
    {
        var sParameterName = sURLVariables[i].split('=');
        if (sParameterName[0] == sParam)
        {
            return sParameterName[1];
        }
    }
}

function sachaScrollToBlog() {
  if (getURLParameter("url")) {
    var link = $('a[href="' + getURLParameter("url") + '"]');
    if (link.length > 0) { 
      $('html, body').scrollTop(link.offset().top - 100);
      link.addClass("highlighted");
    } else {
      alert("Sorry, could not find post in index.");
    }
  }
}

$(document).ready(sachaScrollToBlog);
</script>
<style type="text/css">
a.highlighted { background-color: yellow; padding: 10px }
</style>

Then I added this to the post.php and single.php for my WordPress theme:

<?php
if (get_the_date('Y') >= '2008' && get_the_date('Y-m') < date('Y-m', time() - 60 * 60 * 24 * 7 * 2)) {
  print '<a href="http://pages.sachachua.com/sharing/blog.html?url=' . get_permalink() . '">See in index</a>';
}
?>

The date condition is there to minimize frustration. I’ve indexed posts published 2008 or later, and I usually post an updated index within the first half of the month. I might spend some time indexing older posts; if I do, I’ll update the starting position.

It would be interesting to refine my writing workflow so that my blog index is always up to date. That way, even new posts will have this magic indexing power. It might be difficult to get that squared up with my scheduling, though, since I sometimes write a few weeks in advance. Anyway, neat, huh? This should make the archives marginally more useful. =) Good for me too!