2015-01-09 Emacs Hangout

WELL. That was odd. Somehow the Google universe bifurcated and I spent the first forty minutes awkwardly talking to myself (braindumping Emacs tips) while the rest of the people in the Emacs hangout (1) wondered about my non-existence, and (2) got on with a great conversation about Emacs. I even did the “Hey, can folks hear me?” sort of thing and since some people were in the text chat and confirmed there were technical issues, I assumed that (a) we were talking about the same technical issues, and (b) many of them were inaudible because of said technical issues (or because they were at work, or whatever). The test audio played fine on my end, and the microphone sound levels looked fine too. I could see the group chat and everything. When it finally occurred to me to refresh my screen (which I had hesitated to do because that might end the session for everyone), I finally joined.

BIG THANK YOU to all the Emacs geeks who shrugged at my absence and carried on chatting. =)

Anyway. Fortunately, the recording is actually from their side of the parallel universe, and my interminable, horribly embarrassing blathering is lost forever. (I hope.) I mistakenly clipped it before, but it should be back to normal now.

Here it is.

http://youtu.be/c6abq9Wv9Wk

Let’s get Emacs Hangouts sorted out for February and March. I think I can avoid technical debacles like this if I schedule something where I know at least one other person will turn up a little early and help me with a tech check. If you volunteer, we can pick a time that matches you. (Yay!) Leave a comment or e-mail me at [email protected] . =)

Also, since mailing lists can be useful, here’s one for Emacs Hangout announcements. You’ll get an e-mail to the Google+ Event when we figure out date/time, and another reminder the day before the event. Sign up at http://eepurl.com/bbi-Ir

Deliberately making sense

When it comes to connecting the dots between ideas, would you rather be methodical or inspired?

We prize the flashes of genius, the intuitive spark. We idolize inventors who bring together ideas from different fields in a brilliant moment. The tortoise wins in children’s books, but history belongs to hares.

I would rather be methodical, I think. I’d rather get better at taking lots of small steps instead of counting on big leaps. I plan assuming mediocrity, not talent, and then I try to build towards excellence.

Just relax and the ideas will come to you, people sometimes say. Yes, I do some of that, but I’m more interested in conscious, deliberate action. The sparks will come when they want, but in the meantime, why not get better at preparing the groundwork or making progress? I think you can get better at making sense of things, coming up with ideas, seeing gaps. This is a skill you can develop. You’re not limited to waiting for a fickle muse or wishing you’d been born a hare.

The aha! moments of unconscious connection seem to come more readily when you keep more thoughts in your head, because you have more opportunities to connect the dots. I try to keep very little in my head, as I’m both forgetful and distractable. (I suppose this self-image is something I can change, but it has useful consequences, so I keep it.) I write down as much as I can, which frees me up to remember only hooks and summaries that let me look up more information as I need it.

In fact, I often choose slow exploration instead of a whirlwind of insight. I’d rather take notes as I think instead of jumping from one topic to the other, even if observation changes the nature of thoughts. After all, there are plenty of times when I can think but I can’t write, so I can let my mind meander then. When I’m near a computer or notepad, I may as well take advantage of those tools. If I can capture a thought, then I can remember it, and this helps me build up knowledge over time.

Instead of relying on my brain to trigger an aha! moment out of the blue, I usually reflect on a single topic and see what other associations it brings up. I might link to other blog posts or sketches, include book excerpts, or dig through my private notes for more thoughts. Most of these reflections take small steps forward. Others bring together two or more streams of thought.

I’m often limited by my forgetfulness. I may remember a few relevant references, and I search my blog and my notes for more. However, I don’t always cast a wide enough net. There’s a difference between knowing you’ve forgotten something, and not even thinking that you’ve forgotten something. The first is annoying, but the second is a bigger missed opportunity.

The best way around the associative limitations of my brain seems to be other people. I love it when people tell me how something I’ve written reminds them of a book or someone else’s blog post (sometimes one I’d read and forgotten, sometimes completely new to me), or even how it reminds them of another post of mine.

I can’t count on people to suggest the missing links for most things, though. Fortunately, computers are getting better at suggesting associations. Search engines help when you know what you’re looking for. When you don’t, other tools can analyze what you’re working on and suggest items that are similar in content. I often use Amazon’s book recommendations to find other books I should read. I’ve played around with Remembrance Agent before, and have often envied Devonthink’s ability to suggest related notes. Evernote just released a new Context feature that’s supposed to do something similar. I prefer Emacs for writing anyway, and I don’t have something quite like that set up yet.

The more manual approach of keeping a categorical index of my blog posts lets me get a quick overview. When a category grows too large, I usually break it down into smaller groups. I also take advantage of the juxtaposition of posts in my blog archive when I do my monthly and yearly reviews. Taking a step back helps me see the patterns in my thinking.

Other aspects of connecting the dots also lend themselves to deliberate practice, focusing on one sub-skill at a time. For example, when I read a book, I can practise taking a few moments to place it in the context of other books I’ve read about the topic. With which other books does it agree, and where does it diverge? Thinking about this process lets me isolate and get better at one specific aspect at a time, and that helps me improve as a whole.

Another benefit of using explicit processes to help me make sense of things is that other people can try what I’m learning. I care less about idiosyncratic leaps dependent on individual talent and more about improvements that other people can experiment with. For me, it makes less sense to tell someone, “Be more creative!” and more sense to say something like, “Forced associations are a way to enhance your creativity” and share examples. If I think about how I do things–how my processes are similar to others’, and where it diverges–I can describe them to other people, who can pick up ideas and give me feedback.

So that’s why I choose to be a slow thinker, making sense through process rather than intuition. But I’m getting faster at slow thinking, and that’s opening up more possibilities. I grew up speed-reading and touch-typing, which is a good pair of advantages. To that, I’ve added programming, automation, writing, and different types of note-taking. I’m working on getting the hang of outlining, indexing, reviewing, and synthesizing. There’s a lot to learn, but I’m confident that I can keep improving.

I love swapping notes with other people who’ve made similar choices–the slow thinkers, the methodical ones, the ones who have thought about how they do things and how they think about how they do things. I’m not looking for fast fixes or magic solutions, just ideas for little experiments to try.

Hares might make for better stories, but tortoises have more tricks to share.

Possibly related:

Kahneman’s Thinking, Fast and Slow feels a little related to this thought too, but it’s not quite the right fit.

Do you have any favourite tricks for slow thinking? Are there any tricks I use that you’d like to learn more about?

Sketched Book: Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action – Simon Sinek

Do you talk about what you do and how you do it? Or do you start with why you do the things you do and why this matters? In Start With Why (2009), Simon Sinek writes about how great companies have a clear purpose and identity that inspires employees and earns customer loyalty. Here’s my sketch of the key points from the book so that they’re easier to review or share. Click on the image to view or download a high-resolution version that you can print.

2014-12-13 Sketched Book - Start With Why - Simon Sinek

What are my whys?

  • Visual thinking
    • My selfish reason for visual thinking is because I want to be able to learn, think, and remember more effectively, so that I can live a better life.
    • My altruistic reason for sharing visual thinking is because there are lots of people who enjoy learning from drawings more than text or audio or video. I want to share how I’m learning, but more than that, I want to inspire people to take these techniques and use them for their own. From the resources I share, people can see that you don’t need to draw particularly well in order to use doodling as a way to explore the world or untangle your thoughts.
  • Emacs
    • My selfish reason for Emacs is because I have fun tweaking my editing environment and doing so helps me work better. It tickles my brain. In addition, helping the Emacs community thrive contributes to the longevity of Emacs, which means it will keep growing, which means I probably won’t have to switch to some other tool in the future. (Planning-ahead Sacha plans ahead!)
    • My altruistic reason for Emacs is because I think something incredible happens when you take control of your tools, shaping them to fit your needs, expanding your imagination along the way. I want to help people become intermediate users and power users because I’m curious about what they’ll build for themselves and what they can share with other people. Also, the Emacs community has awesome people. =)
  • Experimenting
    • My selfish reason for experimenting (lifestyle, semi-retirement, business, ideas, etc.) is so that I can figure out what works well for me.
    • My altruistic reason for sharing my experiments is to encourage other people to question their assumptions, look for ways to test their hypotheses, and gradually shape a life that fits them well. Come to think of it, it’s similar to why I like helping people personalize Emacs. If I can help people explore the possibilities in their life, we might come across interesting ideas along the way.

What are your whys? Why do you do what you do, and why does that matter?

Get “Start With Why” on Amazon (affiliate link) or from your favourite book source.

Like this sketch? Check out http://sketchedbooks.com/ for more. Feel free to share – it’s under the Creative Commons Attribution License, like the rest of my blog.

Weekly review: Week ending January 9, 2015

This was the first week back from vacation. It had a good balance of writing (2 days), coding (2 days), and consulting (1 day). I wrote a couple of long posts that you’ll see over the next few weeks. I fixed some bugs on Quantified Awesome, and I used the Flickr API to remove duplicates and link photos with my blog posts. Fun!

I started a new habit of drawing my thoughts on at least five index cards each day. It’s a good way to get my brain going in the morning. After scanning them, I split them by topic into piles on my desk. It’s an easy way to see where my thoughts are building up so that I can pull them together into blog posts.

I filed some tax-related paperwork, too: my second T4, and my first T5. I’m looking forward to finding out whether I’ve figured this all out correctly once the other tax slips come in.

Also, it was J-‘s birthday, so we had sushi and cheesecake. Yay!

Blog posts

Sketches

  1. 2015.01.03 Making better use of basement – index card
  2. 2015.01.03 Making better use of kitchen – index card
  3. 2015.01.03 Making better use of phone – index card
  4. 2015.01.03 Sketched Book – So Good They Can’t Ignore You – Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love – Cal NewportBlogged
  5. 2015.01.03 Social – index card
  6. 2015.01.03 Social bookmarking – index card
  7. 2015.01.03 Why Emacs – index card
  8. 2015.01.04 Automating text – index card
  9. 2015.01.04 Rhythm for learning – index card
  10. 2015.01.04 Thinking in terms of an exchange of time – index card
  11. 2015.01.04 What kind of difference do I want to make, and for whom – index card
  12. 2015.01.05 A reflection on diminishing returns versus compounding growth – index card
  13. 2015.01.05 Developing my imagination and initiative – index cardBlogged
  14. 2015.01.05 Different ideas about mastery – index card
  15. 2015.01.05 Figuring out the technical details of this idea or visual archive I want – index card
  16. 2015.01.05 How can I get better at summary posts – index card
  17. 2015.01.05 Managing my idea pipeline – index cardBlogged
  18. 2015.01.05 Quick idea studies – index cardBlogged
  19. 2015.01.05 Seeing opportunities for abbreviations and text automation – index card
  20. 2015.01.05 Surprise experiment, self-directed life – index card
  21. 2015.01.05 Thinking about my archive – index cardBlogged
  22. 2015.01.05 What can I learn from artists about learning – index cardBlogged
  23. 2015.01.05 Why studies for drawing or writing thoughts – index cardBlogged
  24. 2015.01.06 Abbrevations – index card
  25. 2015.01.06 Competence and mastery – index card
  26. 2015.01.06 Figuring out information flow – index card
  27. 2015.01.06 Is this enough for me – index card
  28. 2015.01.06 Phrases – index card
  29. 2015.01.06 Planning my safety nets – index card
  30. 2015.01.06 Safe, a little better, comfortable – index card
  31. 2015.01.07 Code insertion – index card
  32. 2015.01.07 Mapping the connections in my blog – index card
  33. 2015.01.07 Real Work – index card
  34. 2015.01.07 Sketched Book – The Progress Principle – Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work – Teresa Amabile, Steven Kramer
  35. 2015.01.07 Templates – index card
  36. 2015.01.07 Text transformation as part of expansion – index card
  37. 2015.01.08 How to use what you read – index card
  38. 2015.01.08 Imagining Emacs hangouts – index card
  39. 2015.01.08 Imagining coaching or guiding others – index card
  40. 2015.01.08 Learning as an event – index card
  41. 2015.01.08 Team-building activities – index card
  42. 2015.01.09 Cross-pollination of ideas – index card
  43. 2015.01.09 Take notes while you read books – index card
  44. 2015.01.09 Time is greater than money – index card
  45. 2015.01.09 What am I learning more about, and how can people help – index card
  46. 2015.01.09 What do I do on my non-consulting days – index card

Link round-up

Focus areas and time review

  • Business (36.8h – 21%)
    • Earn: E1: 1-2 days of consulting
    • Revise transcript for Magnar Sveen
    • Earn (6.7h – 18% of Business)
      • Prepare invoice
    • Build (24.4h – 66% of Business)
      • Drawing (10.3h)
        • Organize my sketches for 2014
        • Post The Obstacle Is The Way to blog
      • Delegation (0.0h)
      • Packaging (1.8h)
      • Paperwork (5.8h)
        • File T5 for 2014
        • File T4 for 2014
      • Parse XML from Evernote and extract all the journal entries
      • Remove duplicates from Flickr list
      • Fix csa_foods
      • AJAXify clothing log
      • Fix the menu on small screens
      • Change error message since I don’t get notified about stuff
      • Clear up Documents/Documents confusion
      • Re-cross-reference blog posts with Flickr. What’s a nice, sustainable way of doing this?
    • Connect (5.7h – 15% of Business)
      • Talk to journalist about Quantified Self
      • Find contact information and timezone
  • Relationships (7.7h – 4%)
    • Check protocol and copy dates
  • Discretionary – Productive (26.4h – 15%)
    • Emacs (1.3h – 0% of all)
      • Revise transcript for Thomas Kjeldahl Nilsson
      • Blog about most recent Emacs Hangout
      • Developing Emacs micro-habits: Text automation
    • Get passport pictures
    • Scan passport
    • Apply for passport
    • Pick up my lunch
    • Writing (16.8h)
      • Smooth out image workflow for writing
  • Discretionary – Play (9.7h – 5%)
  • Personal routines (20.7h – 12%)
  • Unpaid work (8.4h – 5%)
  • Sleep (58.2h – 34% – average of 8.3 per day)

Thinking about how to make better use of Yasnippet in my Emacs workflow

One of the awesome things that Karl Voit demonstrated in this Emacs Chat was how he used YASnippet and Org Mode to quickly create projects with several related tasks, such as when organizing a group to attend an event. He selected the snippet and filled in different fields like the artist name and the event date, and Emacs generated all these sub-tasks and e-mail templates with the information already filled in.

I’ve used YASnippet once or twice, but mostly I’ve been using org-capture and org-capture-templates instead. YASnippet looks like it might be more flexible because you can fill in fields in a non-linear order and you can re-evaluate Emacs Lisp expressions as you type.

Lots of people do cool things with YASnippet. For example, it’s popular for programming because it lets people quickly expand short sequences into longer syntax. Check out this Emacs Rocks episode on YASnippet to get a sense of what it can do. (Note: YASnippet has changed its naming convention slightly, so things like yas/text have been replaced with yas-text.) People have used it for e-mail templates and to fill in metadata for blog posts.

I’d like to use YASnippet more. Where can I integrate it into my workflow? Probably wherever checklists and templates make sense. I’ve been thinking about checklists and templates as a way to improve how I do things.

Checklists are good for making sure that you complete tasks more consistently, not missing any important steps. You can work faster when there’s a guide, since you don’t have to keep thinking of the next step each time. The simple act of checking things off can encourage you to put in more effort, since the list shows you your progress. It also makes it easier to remember to follow up.

Templates help you improve the structure of your work. You can make sure you cover all the important parts. If you use similar structures for many things, then people get used to finding information in the same logical places. This doesn’t mean that you’re stuck with cookie-cutter formats. You can still adapt the format to your needs.

I’m particularly interested in using checklists and templates to improve in three areas:

  • Programming: I’d like to write with less friction and use best practices like testing
  • Helping the Emacs community: Checklists can help me make sure I do all the steps to prepare for and make the most of Emacs Hangouts and Emacs Chats. They might also lower the intimidation factor so that I end up scheduling these more often.
  • Writing: I think checklists and templates will help me invest more time into developing thoughts, relationships, and structure.

Programming

As mentioned, YASnippet’s popular for programming. You can take advantage of existing collections of snippets for different programming modes (ex: AndreaCrotti’s collection), or you can define your own.

I’d like to get better at developing single-page applications using AngularJS, Twitter Bootstrap / Zurb Foundation, and NodeJS. YASnippet might let me quickly put together short applications and test suites. If I get my workflow smooth enough, I might even be able to do an app-a-week (or app-a-day) sprint for deliberate practice. There are often lots of fiddly little syntax or keyword things that I look up while writing code. While practising typing those things in again and again will help me memorize them, there’s also some value in automating that part with snippets so that I can focus on the core skills of designing and implementing small web applications.

YASnippet might also be able to help me use Org Mode to keep track of ideas for features or small web applications throughout the implementation process. I wonder if I should implement this using lots of subtasks or using TODO states with logs. TODO states might be easier to filter or visualize with the kanban package for Org Mode. Maybe I’ll try both approaches. In any case, checklists will help me remember to think about designs and tests before implementing the code, and maybe I can keep track of deployment notes, lessons learned, and follow-up tasks.

Emacs Community

I find checklists to be really helpful when setting up live videocasts. I’m usually too frazzled to think of all the steps I need to do at the last minute. Paper checklists are good because I can refer to them while keeping my screen ready to be recorded. Still, an Org Mode-based checklist (possibly with dynamic date fields and e-mail templates provided by YASnippet) might go a long way towards standardizing the before- and after-event process, and that might in turn reduce the friction enough for me to do more of them. Both Emacs Chats and Emacs Hangouts seem to be popular, so it would be good to get more of these on the go.

The process would be something like:

  1. Reach out to the person who’s going to be featured on the Emacs Chat, or at least one other person who’s willing to be there for the Emacs Hangout (so that I don’t end up talking to myself for the first ten minutes, which is Awkward)
  2. Figure out what will be discussed (for Emacs Chats)
  3. Set up a time, considering timezones
  4. Set up the Google+ event page
  5. Update the Google Calendar
  6. Post a notice on Twitter and on my blog (I’ve been forgetting to do this step)
  7. On the day of the event
    1. Do the last-minute push (I’ve been forgetting to do this as well)
    2. Create the Google Hangout on Air
    3. Set it up for Q&A
    4. Invite the other person in for Emacs Chats, or post the URL for Emacs Hangouts
    5. Host the video chat
    6. Remind people where the recording can be found
    7. Update the Google+ page with the link to the next thing
  8. Extract the MP3 from the video, change the properties, and upload it to archive.org
  9. Post a blog post with the embedded video, podcast audio, and quick notes
  10. Transcribe the video or pay for transcription
  11. Edit the transcript
  12. Update the post with the transcript
  13. Update the Google+ event page with the link to the transcript, post to social networks (I’ve been forgetting this)
  14. Update EmacsLife.com, too (yet another thing I’ve been forgetting)

I think it would be totally awesome to get to the point where I can call an Emacs Lisp function that would Do The Right Thing at that point, like posting to Twitter or using something like org-trello to make a Trello card and assign it to the person who does my transcriptions.

Writing

I’m getting the hang of using outlines to write (and I should post a video about this soon), but it might be even cooler if I can get the hang of writing with more structure. For example, Michael Hyatt posted this blog post checklist that he had been using with Evernote. I like it because:

  • The template asks you to be explicit about the post’s objective and subject.
  • It encourages you to add more illustrations, links, and stories.
  • It reminds you to take steps that you might otherwise skip, and you might spend several days revising the post.

I might not use it for every post, but it’s good to flesh out some ideas further, especially the ones where I think I’m onto something particularly interesting.

It would be even cooler if I could take advantage of YASnippet’s dynamic Emacs Lisp evaluation to remind me of relevant links from my blog post outline given the category. I remember playing around with the Remembrance Agent, which monitored a few hundred words around your cursor and brought up files that had similar words. Matching on category isn’t going to be anywhere as sophisticated, but it still might be a good way to refresh my memory. Even if I had a quick Emacs Lisp interactive function that read whatever category property I’d set (chosen from the org-refile-able targets) and displayed the section from my blog post index in another window, I think that would be a pretty neat start.

I tend to draft posts within my sharing outline (which I sporadically publish at http://pages.sachachua.com/sharing/). When I’m done, I delete the subtree, sometimes replacing it with a link to the post to help me follow up on it in the future. This means losing that metadata, though. It might be interesting to keep the metadata so that I can review the goals and backstory of a blog post.

YASnippet can also help me keep track of the TODOs related to a post as well. For example, I might want to come up with sketches, tweet links, or follow up on ideas. If I use a YASnippet to plan my blog post in the first place, then I can create a TODO (possibly with a link back to the blog post) that I could leave in place or refile to the appropriate location in my regular Org Mode files.

I don’t think YASnippet dynamic fields persist after the file is saved and reloaded, though. How would that work if I need to change things? Maybe I can use multiple-cursors to mark all the matching text in the subtree, or do other clever things with it…

Next steps

Okay. It looks like setting up YASnippet for Emacs checklists would probably give me the quickest win. Programming is also pretty straightforward. Writing might be interesting too, if I can get the hang of working with that kind of structure. Let’s see how that goes. Once I figure out what those snippets will be like, I’ll post them on Github somewhere. =)

Is YASnippet part of your workflow? Have any thoughts, suggestions, or neat stories?

Predictable advice about productivity

Let me think out loud a bit about this, since there’s something here that I want to dig into.

Someone asked me if I’d consider answering the question “What’s your morning ritual/routine that helps you stay productive and organised throughout the day?” for inclusion in a blog round-up.

Ordinarily, I’m not too keen on answering surveys or filling out questionnaires from people. I know it’s a popular content-generation technique and that bloggers like doing it because it encourages people to link, but there’s something about the format that feels a little meh. I’m even less enthusiastic about blog roundups because the typical format–a list of names, links, and a quoted paragraph or two–doesn’t lend itself well to nuanced observation or discussion.

Still, I’d been thinking about reflecting on the topic for a while, so I bumped it up my list of things to write about and drafted this: Relaxed routines.

I sent a sneak peek of the draft to the person who asked me, and he responded:

The fact that you wrote “Sometimes I think of three things I would like to do that day, and I type a few notes and thoughts into Evernote” is very interesting because other experts also think of 3 things they want to do every morning and go after them.

And I thought, no, that’s not the point I want to make. Which made me think: What is the point I want to make? I said:

When you write, don’t look for the same, old, common, generic advice. Look for what’s unusual or unintuitive or idiosyncratic.

Come to think of it, I should probably expand on this thing about slowing down, taking notes, and sharing them, since a lot of people are worried about interrupting momentum or giving away their secrets. To me, that’s more interesting than picking a few priorities for the day, which (as you noted) many other people do.

So there’s an interesting thought there that I’m going to flesh out and add to the draft. Perhaps by the time you read this, I’ll have already added and posted it.

Anyway. This got me thinking about the predictability of most productivity advice. If I crack open a newly-published book on productivity or click on one of the countless blog posts that flow into my streams, I know that more likely than not, it will tell me to: Wake up early. Prioritize. Don’t start with e-mail. Take care of your health.

It’s about as surprising as reading a personal finance book that tells me to spend less than I earn. Granted, there are probably lots of people for whom the repetition of these concepts helps.

I wonder how to go beyond the same old advice. What kinds of information have been helpful for me when I want to change? What would be more helpful for other people? How can I go beyond writing generic thoughts myself? How can I notice and dig into the differences? How can I learn from more divergences?

Here’s what I’ve found helpful:

  • Collections of different approaches, so that I can experiment and find out what works for me. I don’t read books looking for the One True Way to manage your tasks. I look for the diversity of systems described by different people so that I can extract ideas that I can play around with. That also means that I don’t want trite advice that I already have previous samples of. I’m looking for new stuff, things to make me go “Hmm, let me try that.”
  • Pointers to interesting people, which is related to the first benefit. For example, when reading about how scholars managed information before computers (Too Much to Know: Managing Scholarly Information Before the Modern Age), I came across historical role models like Seneca and Pliny. That led me to learn more about their stories so that I could understand their techniques in context. It isn’t just about isolated pieces of advice, but people whose lives that advice came from and why they learned that. Plus points for people I can identify with or be inspired by: “Oh, she did that, so I can probably pull off something similar too!”
  • Behind-the-scenes thoughts: Reading people’s thoughts about their own systems is more interesting for me than reading people’s conjectures about other people’s secrets. I like reading blog posts from people who are thinking out loud, because that lets me peek into other people’s thought processes and watch how they learn. I like seeing the in-between stuff, not just the polished products.
  • Reflection questions, so that I can direct my awareness to things I might otherwise overlook, and so that I can evaluate things.
  • Research, particularly with non-intuitive results. For example, applied psychology tells us our brain is subject to all sorts of fallacies, and being aware of things like sunk cost fallacy helps me try to correct for them.

So with that in mind, how can I improve that reflection on routines so that I and other people can get more value from it?

Let me think about potential points of divergence from common wisdom, and why I’ve chosen those ways:

  • I sleep in instead of getting up early. For me, it’s important to mostly go to bed at the same time W- goes to bed (unless he’s staying up really late). Since that’s usually between 12 AM to 1 AM and I need a bit more than 8 hours to feel well-rested, this means I usually get up between 8:30 and 9:30. I organize the rest of my schedule around this, including avoiding all morning meetings.
  • I follow my energy instead of forcing myself to stick to a plan. I used to block off time to work on specific things, but I realized that I enjoy flexibility and I work better with an open schedule. More about this.
  • I don’t make specific, measurable, time-bound goals. I found that I’m not motivated by “urgent” deadlines that I set myself. Instead, I keep a large list of small tasks, and I use those to keep moving forward on different things.
  • I slow down to take notes. Many people tell me they don’t have the time to take notes. I make note-taking part of the way I do things, whether it’s thinking about a decision, learning about a new topic, or debugging a problem. It’s not really slowing down, actually. I suspect that I make slower progress when I don’t take notes, because my mind gets more jittery and has to cover the same ground repeatedly.
  • I share what I’m learning. People are often concerned about giving away their secrets, looking foolish, or letting go of competitive advantages. I find that blogging helps me learn more, connect with interesting people, and get more stuff done.
  • I don’t worry about being responsive. I’m very casual about responding to e-mail and blog comments. I can go a week or two (and sometimes more!) before replying, although I check more frequently than that. I treat them as long-term asynchronous conversations, not as firm commitments. This lets me see my e-mail mostly positively as a source of interesting questions and ideas, rather than as an obligation that gets in the way of Real Work.
  • It’s easy for me to choose slack over status or stuff. This is more of a personal finance thing, I think. I’m picky about the things I swap my life for, because I prefer space, freedom, and resisting hedonic adaptation. This is why it’s easy for me to ignore advertising.
  • I’ve shut up the “You’re not an artist!” internal self-censor so that I can use visual thinking to explore ideas. People often tell me that they wish they could draw sketchnotes too. Pointing out that I draw like a 5-year-old still doesn’t seem to be enough to help them get over that mental barrier. Someday I’ll probably figure out how to help people hack around that.

For each of these choices, there are probably thousands of other people (at least) who do the same thing. That’s okay. In fact, that’s terrific, because then we can swap notes. =) I don’t have to say totally unique things. I’m not sure I can. I just want to add more to the conversation than generic “advice.”

So how do those choices influence my everyday routines? Well, waking up when I feel like it is an obvious one. Writing, drawing, and publishing throughout the day is another. This 5-year experiment is another result of those choices.

The most useful change that people can experiment with, I think, is the one of writing stuff down, even if they don’t publish it. Not just plans and reviews (although those are good places to start), but the in-between stuff, the “I’m not entirely sure where I’m going with this” stuff. It could be a text file or a document or a paper notebook – just somewhere you can leave breadcrumbs for your brain so that you can come back to things after interruptions and so that you can go back in time.

But journaling is also part of the set of standard productivity advice, so what can I add here? The reassurance that no, it doesn’t make you go slower, it actually lets you cover more ground? A demonstration, so that people can see what that looks like (especially over years)? Workflow tweaks to better integrate it into the way you do things? Personal knowledge management ideas for organization? Surveys of other people’s systems so that we can pick up great ideas?

If I want some fraction of the people who read me to pick up this writing habit, what I can do to help them (you!) get over any barriers or excuses?

That’s what I should write. I’m not going to be able to trigger that epiphany in one excerpted paragraph in a list of twenty or fifty or people. But I can always explore the idea on this blog (with your help =) ), and other people can link to or summarize whatever they want, and who knows what conversations can grow.