Sketched Book: Take Charge of Your Talent: Three Keys to Thriving in Your Career, Organization, and Life – Don Maruska, Jay Perry (2013)

Don Maruska and Jay Perry’s Take Charge of Your Talent: Three Keys to Thriving in Your Career, Organization, and Life (2013) has plenty of tips for developing your skills and taking charge of your career. I’ve sketched the key points of the book below to make it easier to remember and share. Click on the image for a larger version that you can print if you want.

2014-12-25 Sketched Book - Take Charge of Your Talent - Three Keys to Thriving in Your Career, Organization, and Life - Don Maruska and Jay Perry

I liked the chapter on reflecting on your talents through a structured conversation with someone who can reflect back not only your words but also your feelings and hopes. Sometimes we don’t see the patterns in our thoughts until someone points it out to us. The questions are also good for personal reflection, and I’m looking forward to using them in my planning.

Sometimes people ask me to help them figure out what they want to do. Other books I’ve read about coaching tend to be pretty high-level, but this one gives concrete advice, including some notes anticipating potential responses or difficulties.

I also liked the chapters on creating tangible assets and sharing them with other people. That’s been a great learning- and career-booster for me, and I hope other people will try it out as well.

Among other things, the book also suggests listing at least one hundred resources (people, places, things, skills, …). Forced-length lists are great for creativity because you dig deeper than your surface answers, often coming across surprises. When you review your list, think about ways that you could make even better use of those resources. The book also suggests taking a look at your top 10 resources and working towards 100% use of them, which will be an interesting challenge. The third related exercise is to combine different resources so that you can break through obstacles or come up with interesting mash-ups – forced association, another great creativity technique. I like this reminder to apply creativity so that you can recognize and make the most of your resources, which allows you to MacGyver your way to growth.

Want the book? You can buy it from Amazon (affiliate link) or check out their website at .

Like this sketch? Check out sketchedbooks.com for more. Feel free to share – it’s under the Creative Commons Attribution License, like the rest of my blog.

Enjoy!

Miscellaneous memories

Because these don’t quite fit in their own blog posts, but I want to stash them in my blog anyway.

2015-02-04 Yay, passport -- index card #canada #travel #paperwork

2015-02-04 Yay, passport – index card #canada #travel #paperwork

I got my Canadian passport, yay! I’m still not particularly keen on travel, but this will make it loads easier when I do. Fewer visas to apply for, fewer paperwork hassles… Hooray!

2015-01-30 Sunlight in a cafe -- index card #cafe #light

2015-01-30 Sunlight in a cafe – index card #cafe #light

Our kitchen is the room with the most sunlight in our house, so I spend most of my time in it. But it faces west, so it doesn’t get as much sun as a south-facing room would. (Life in the northern hemisphere: I’m still getting the hang of all the little details!)

The other week, I went to a cafe to help someone with Emacs. So much sunlight! Wonderful. I felt like a cat.

2015-01-27 Field's metal -- index card #hacklab

2015-01-27 Field’s metal – index card #hacklab

Eric brought some Field’s metal to Hacklab. It’s a metal that melts at a temperature below that of hot water. We cast tiny robots in a chocolate mold. =)

2015-01-31 Clearing my fabric stash -- index card #tidying #decluttering

2015-01-31 Clearing my fabric stash – index card #tidying #decluttering

Decluttering the basement, letting go of just-in-case fabric and planned projects I hadn’t touched in years. I might take up sewing again, but I’ll be more careful about fabric and pattern purchases.

Hmm, maybe I should include little memories in my weekly review. That makes sense. I’ll do that going forward!

Weekly review: Week ending February 13, 2015

This week was about trying to get the hang of shopping. I find shopping to be a frustrating process, but I think that’s something I can tweak about myself. We were scrambling to get everything in order for a formal-ish dinner at a banquet hall with extended family. My office attire (slacks, a blazer, and a dress shirt) worked fine, but the exercise prompted me to think about my wardrobe and choosing clothes more deliberately.

My work laptop crashed, so that took a bite out of my productivity. I’ll check next week to see if they’ve gotten it sorted out. I used a loaner laptop to get a few more things done, but it would be good to set everything up properly again.

This coming week: hosting an Emacs Hangout, baking for the Repair Cafe to be held at Hacklab, attending a Sketchnote Hangout, and going to a networking event. Lots of talking to people, so I’ll try to have lots of quiet time as well.

output

Blog posts

Sketches

Link round-up

Focus areas and time review

  • Business (33.2h – 19%)
    • Earn (10.7h – 32% of Business)
      • Earn: E1: 1-2 days of consulting
    • Build (18.7h – 56% of Business)
      • Drawing (12.9h)
      • Delegation (0.1h)
      • Packaging (0.2h)
      • Paperwork (0.8h)
    • Connect (3.8h – 11% of Business)
    • Revisit Google login thing
    • Quantified Awesome: Fix Google login again
  • Relationships (6.6h – 3%)
    • Have lunch with Gabriel
    • Call my mom and wish her happy birthday
    • Check on @mattl’s upcoming visit to Toronto
    • Book haircut
    • Try online shopping
    • Help W- with ntp
  • Discretionary – Productive (23.7h – 14%)
    • Emacs (15.0h – 8% of all)
      • Figure out a neat way to backdate Org clock entries consistently
      • Fix Emacs init errors
      • Refine Emacs code for working with questions
      • Explore Hydra
      • Make something that automatically cross-references sketches with blog posts
      • Make dired action for processing marked files
      • Create Emacs conference thing
      • Help Sean with Emacs
      • Chat with Yi about Emacs
      • Set up my Vagrant to send mail through Gmail
      • Try to get Gnus to send mail again on Windows
      • Try out org-gcal
    • Review Zettelkasten research
    • Scan my sewing pattern catalog
    • Consider pants
    • Upload to Gumroad
    • Read chapter 3 of Intermediate Japanese
    • Make cover for Createspace
    • Upload to Createspace
    • Start git directory for drafts
    • Writing (5.9h)
  • Discretionary – Play (7.1h – 4%)
  • Personal routines (21.0h – 12%)
  • Unpaid work (20.6h – 12%)
  • Sleep (55.8h – 33% – average of 8.0 per day)

Continuous integration and code coverage for Emacs packages with Travis and Coveralls

Do you maintain an Emacs package hosted on Github? Would you like to get those confidence-building, bragging-rights-granting, other-developers-inspiring build: passing and coverage: 100% badges into your README file?

It turns out that this is pretty easy with ERT, Cask, Travis CI, undercover.el, and Coveralls.io.

  1. Log on to Travis and enable continuous integration for your repository.
  2. Log on to Coveralls.io and enable coverage testing for your repository.
  3. Set up a git branch, since you’ll probably be making lots of small commits while you smooth out the testing workflow.
  4. Define your tests with ERT. See https://github.com/abo-abo/tiny/blob/master/tiny-test.el for an example. For undercover support, you’ll want to include something like:
    (when (require 'undercover nil t)
      (undercover "tiny.el"))
    
  5. Define your dependencies with Cask. Include undercover. For example, here’s a simple Cask file:
    (source gnu)
    (source melpa)
    
    (development
      (depends-on "undercover"))
    
  6. Add a .travis.yml that specifies how to test your package on Travis. For example, see this .travis.yml and Makefile.
  7. Commit and push.
  8. Check your repository status in Travis to see if it ran properly.
  9. Check your coverage status in Coveralls.io to see if it displayed properly.
  10. Get the badge code from Travis and Coveralls, and add them to your README (probably using Markdown). You can get the badge code from Travis by clicking on your build status badge next to your repository name. Coveralls has prominent instructions for getting your badge. Yay!

Incidentally, if you want to see your test coverage locally, you can (require 'testcover) and then use testcover-this-defun or testcover-start to instrument the macros and functions for coverage. Run your tests, then use testcover-mark-all to look at the results. See the documentation in testcover.el to find out what the coloured overlays mean. Edebug has a test coverage tool too, so you can explore that one if you prefer it.

Additional notes on testing:

2015-02-03 Better Emacs Testing -- index card #testing #emacs

2015-02-03 Better Emacs Testing – index card #testing #emacs

2015-02-04 Yay, testing in Emacs -- index card #testing #emacs

2015-02-04 Yay, testing in Emacs – index card #testing #emacs

Resources:

Experimenting my way to an awesome life

“The question I really want to answer is: How can I live a fuller life, a happier life, a more productive life?” said someone in a recent e-mail about Quantified Self.

This made me think: The ideal life differs from person to person. What kind of awesome life am I moving towards? What motivates my choices and experiments, and how can I explore and learn more effectively?

I have role models for this, so I can imagine what it looks like. I can look at the differences between our lives to get a better understanding of the gaps and divergences.

My parents have full, happy, productive, and significant lives (although I think my mom thinks that what she’s doing isn’t as awesome or as significant as what my dad does). They make things happen. In particular, my dad touches lots of people’s lives. He has this really big scope.

W- lives a full, happy, productive life. I think he focuses on doing a good job at work, doing the right thing, knowing (and applying!) all sorts of good knowledge, and being a great husband and dad. We’re probably not going to get added to any tribal epics or history books, but that’s okay. I tend to think of his scope as smaller, more local, and he’s totally awesome within it. He sometimes reaches beyond that scope to support interesting things, like Kickstarters for well-designed products.

I think I live a decently full, happy, and productive life as well. Definitely yes to the happy bit; yay for high genetic set-points for happiness, good coping mechanisms, and a tremendous amount of luck. I keep some slack in my life, so I don’t feel like it’s super-full or super-productive. But people tell me that I do a lot, so maybe this is like the way my mom’s not as sure about her own contributions. I could probably do more, but this is as good a start as any.

My scope tends to be similar to W-‘s, focusing on our little world. But I also have these odd outgrowths for things like Emacs, visual thinking, social business, Hacklab… These aren’t as driven as my dad’s initiatives or my friends’ startups. They’re more… curiosity-based, maybe? I enjoy exploring those playgrounds and sharing what I’m learning. I think W- is like this too – he follows his curiosity into new areas.

So, if that helps me understand a little of who I am now, what does that tell me about the future Sacha I’m gradually inching towards, and what experiments can help me learn more?

I imagine Awesome Sacha to be this capable, curious person with lots of skills, including practical DIY stuff. Her equanimity and optimism lets her handle whatever life throws at her (and learn from it!). Maybe she’s more involved in the community now, helping her favourite causes, but probably more from a position of lifting people up rather than going on crusades. She takes plenty of notes and shares them, helping other people learn faster and see the connections among different ideas.

If that’s a potentially interesting Future Sacha I could become, what can I track to measure my progress along the way, and what kinds of experiments could stretch me a little bit more towards that?

  • I can pick up and practise more skills: Cooking, sewing, electronics, DIY repair, etc. I can track this through journal entries, blog posts, comfort level, and decisions to do things myself versus asking or paying someone else to do things. For example, I now feel comfortable cooking, and I remember feeling a lot more uncertain about it before. I feel moderately okay about repairing small appliances and doing simple woodworking, but could use more practice. I have hardly any experience with plumbing or tiling.
  • I can observe more, and write about more of what I’m learning: The little hiccups and challenges in my life feel so much smaller than the ones that other people go through, and I usually don’t write about them. Keeping a journal (even for the small stuff) might result in interesting reading later on, though. I already bounce back pretty quickly. It might be interesting to see how I respond to larger and larger changes, though, so deliberately taking on more commitments and more risks can help me develop this part of my life.
  • I can help out more. I think it’s okay even if I don’t try to maximize utility on this for now. I’ll start with the things that resonate with me. It’s easy enough to track hours and money for this; maybe later I can add stories too.
  • I can get better at taking, organizing, and sharing my notes. I can see the gap in my note-taking by noticing when I’m annoyed that I can’t find my old notes (either because I hadn’t written them up properly or I didn’t make them findable enough). As for organizing and sharing my notes, perhaps I can track the number of longer guides I put together, and whether I can get the hang of working with outlines and pipelines…

Most of my little experiments come from looking at ideas that are close by and saying, “Hmm, that’s interesting. Maybe I can explore that.” Sometimes it helps to look a little further ahead–to sketch out an ideal life, or even just a slightly-better-than-this life–and to plan little steps forward, going roughly in the right direction. Some ideals fit you better than others do, and some ideals just won’t resonate with you. For example, I currently don’t wish to be a highly-paid jetsetting public speaker. Thinking about this helps you figure out what kind of future you might want, and maybe figure out a few ways to try it on for size and track your progress as you grow into it.

What kind of person would Awesome You be like, and how can you inch a little closer?

Help your readers discover more posts by organizing your content with a reverse outline

You’ve written lots of blog posts, and maybe you’ve even organized them using categories and tags. But your readers are still getting lost. They like the posts they’ve found using search engines, but they don’t know where to go next. If they click on your categories or tags, they see your newest posts, but they might not find your most useful ones or figure out a good order to read posts in. Sure, if you wrote all your posts according to a well-planned editorial calendar, people can follow that sequence. (If only we could all be so organized!)

I know what that’s like. I’ve got thousands of posts in my archive, and even I find it hard to navigate through them. I’ve tried all sorts of plugins for suggesting related posts, but I didn’t find any that could suggest good relevant content quickly.

How can we help people find the posts they need? Adding a “Popular Posts” widget to the sidebar is one way to help people discover your posts, but it only shows a handful of entries. A better way to help lost readers is to put together a page with links to your recommended posts. You can call it Resources, Start Here, or a similar title, and add a prominent link to your menu or sidebar. Off the top of your mind, you can probably think of a few blog posts to include on a resources page. Add those to the page and start helping your readers.

When you have a little more time, gradually incorporate more links into that page. You’ll still want to highlight the key posts people should begin with, but after that (short) list, you can add more lists of recommended posts by topic. Choose your most important category and review the posts within it. Copy the titles and links from your blog posts and arrange them in a logical order, using either a list or an outline. For example, you might go from a list like:

  • Post 1
  • Post 2
  • Post 3
  • Post 4
  • Post 5

to an outline like:

  • Subtopic 1
    • Post 1
    • Post 3
  • Subtopic 2
    • Post 2
    • Post 4
    • Post 5

As you get an overview of your posting history, you might find opportunities to summarize several posts into a longer guide, update and improve previous posts, and fill in the gaps with additional posts. Add these ideas to your editorial calendar or idea notebook, and use those ideas the next time you sit down to write.

2015-01-12 Reverse outlining -- index card #writing #organization #outlining

2015.01.12 Reverse outlining – index card #writing #organization #outlining

For example, when I looked at what I’d written in my blogging category, I realized that I could organize these posts by the excuses they addressed. Then it was easy to turn those excuses into a short guide, which became something I could offer on my resources page. In fact, I’ve been working on organizing all of my recent posts into a massive reverse outline or blog index.

Building this kind of a “reverse outline” from your existing posts helps you reuse what you’ve already published instead of starting from scratch. Good luck!