Planning a time-tracking workshop for Quantified Self Toronto

Quantified Self Toronto is organizing a conference on self-tracking in February. Whee! I’ve promised to put together a small workshop on time-tracking, since a number of people are interested in collecting and analyzing their time data.

Here are some rough plans for the time-tracking workshop:

2013-12-21 Plans for time-tracking workshop

I need to figure out what pieces people need to learn and what I can fit into the workshop time. Some of the pieces may have to be for follow-up or individually-paced study. Here are the pieces I probably need to put together. It still feels too large for a two-hour course, so I’ll need to trim it even more – maybe make iOS, Android, and RescueTime/ManicTime more cursory mentions than in-depth explorations.2013-12-21 Pieces wanted for time-tracking course

Here are some thoughts on one of the pieces, transforming your time data.

2013-12-21 Transforming your time data

 

More pieces: Easy ways to track time

2014-01-03 Easy ways to track time

Staying on the time-tracking wagon

2014-01-03 Staying on the time-tracking wagon

I was offline during most of our trip to the Philippines, so it was a good test of how I could track without a Web connection to QuantifiedAwesome.com. I tried writing timestamps and activities in a small notebook that I kept in my beltbag, and I also tried using a timestamping application on my smartphone. (KeepTrack on my Android phone, if you’re curious.) The smartphone was much more convenient and less obtrusive, oddly enough. When I wrote timestamps down on paper, people commented on that as an unusual activity, but people are used to people checking their screens. Since I could easily backdate entries, I could postpone pulling my phone out until I wasn’t worried about safety or distractedness. When I got back online, I simply used the batch entry interface to add several days of entries at once.

I don’t have any iOS devices, so I might have a bit of a challenge putting together recommendations for people with iPhones. I’ve also gotten spoiled by the time-crunching capabilities I built into QuantifiedAwesome, so I’ll work on fleshing out  spreadsheet-focused analyses instead.

I’d like to put together some resources to help people get started during the workshop, with follow-up materials. I’ll also turn the info into an online course (most likely free). Would you like to help me make it happen? I’d love to hear from people who are doing similar things and have workflow tips/observations, and I’m also happy to test the material and do Q&A with people who want to apply the ideas to their life.

Hmm, maybe I’m not slacking off after all

Even though I’ve got the steady accumulation of DONE tasks showing my slow-but-constant progress, I still sometimes feel like I’m leaving something on the table when it comes to how I use my time. I feel like I’m living with a more relaxed pace, especially compared with the world of work around me or my fuzzed-by-time recollections of pre-experiment and early-experiment days.

Top line = All tasks excluding cancelled ones, bottom line = DONE

Top line = All tasks excluding cancelled ones, bottom line = DONE

I was thinking about how my time use has shifted over the past few years. I compared my percentages in different categories for 2012, 2013, and for 2014 to date. But the numbers say I’m actually spending more time on work and personal projects, and I do seem to manage to check off lots of things on my TODO list. =) So maybe I’m doing okay with this after all, even though sometimes I think I’m slacking off.

Top-level categories:

  • Sleep: Pretty consistent (34.5-36.6%) – this works out to 8.3-8.8 hours a day.
  • Business: Down, then up lately – 24%, 21%, 26%; but I expect this to be a little lower this year, since I’m taking three months off. =) I’ll probably focus on even more writing, drawing, and Emacs geekery then. (And maybe a crash course in a useful skill…)
    Avg hours per week 2012 2013 2014 to date
    Earn 20 15 17
    Build 12 13 18
    Connect 8 7 9
    Total 40 35 44
  • Discretionary: Up, then down – 18%, 22%, 16%
  • Personal care: Pretty consistent (13-14%)
  • Chores/unpaid work: Pretty consistent (7-8%)

As before, the business/discretionary trade-off is really the main thing that moves. The rest of my life stays pretty much the same. The second level of categories is worth looking at too:

  • Writing is pretty consistent at 3%, or roughly 5 hours a week. Still, I think I’d like to write more. What should get reduced? Ah, video games have been soaking up a little time – although they’re exercise too. Hmm, I could intensify that exercise so that I get more out of it. Oh! I’ve been spending more time gardening lately; that could be another reason. I like both of those alternative activities too, and I think they’ll taper off after a while. That’s okay, there’ll be time enough to write more. Besides, some of my writing is filed under Emacs-related time instead. =)
  • Trending up:
    • Drawing (2.0-4.1%): This is good.
    • Planning (0.2-1.5%): Hmm, this is interesting. Am I running into diminishing returns here? Maybe less time planning, more time experimenting.
    • Emacs (0.4-2.8%), and I’m looking forward to spending even more time on this.
    • Relaxing (0.6-2.0%)
  • Trending down:
    • Tidying up, cleaning the kitchen (2.3-1.6%) – about 3 hours a week? I should do more around the house (or maybe I am, and I’m not tracking it properly)
    • Working on Quantified Awesome (1.4-0.8%) – steady-state since I’m happy with the code so far?
    • Reading fiction (1.2-0.4%) – subsumed into other activities
    • Socializing (8.0-1.4%) – big drop here; winter, becoming more selective?
    • Networking (4.7-1.7%) – big drop here too; not networking as actively
    • Biking (2.4-0.7%) – but then it’s still early in the biking season, and I work fewer days too

I’ll continue to focus on gardening for a bit until the garden is more established. I want to exercise and bike more as well. And there’s all sorts of Emacs coolness to learn about and share! =) Writing will have to be content with these little snippets–thinking out loud, sharing what I learn, and other things like that–until I can spend more time focusing on developing ideas. Mostly, the increase in time on other activities seems to be coming from the time I used to spend socializing. I actually like this new balance. The stuff I make and share online seems to lead to more ongoing conversations than those hi-hellos at tech events, and I’m still happy to spend a few hours getting to know people or going somewhere.

I got the time numbers from http://quantifiedawesome.com and a bit of spreadsheet number-crunching, and the task numbers from Emacs + Org Mode + R. =) Yay data!

Quantified Awesome: Added sparklines and percentages

As I was answering the standard question of “Who are you and what do you do?”, I thought it might be interesting to come up with the percentages for what I actually do based on my time records. After all, I have the data. In the past, I used to export my records to a spreadsheet and do some easy number-crunching. Why bother, though, if I can program the system to do this for me?`

I ended up spending 3.5 hours adding percentages and sparklines to Quantified Awesome, updating my RSpec tests along the way. (100% coverage, yay!) Here’s what the result looks like:

2014-06-11 13_34_46-quantified awesome

The sparklines let me easily see trends and exceptions, while percentages can be easily multiplied by 168 hours to get weekly estimates or 24 hours to get daily ones. For example, sleep took up 35.8% of my time from 2012-02-17 to 2014-06-11, or an average of 8.6 hours a day. Activities directly related to earning money took up 10.9% of my time, or roughly 18.3 hours a week. The sprints and spikes are easier to see with sparklines than with tabular data, and they were easy to implement with JQuery Sparklines.

So now I can be more accurate when answering the question: “What do you do?” It doesn’t make sense to include all the minutiae. People don’t really answer that question with “Sleep,” even though that takes up much of people’s time. However, I can pick a threshold (1%?) and look at the activities above that. That is, for the ~28 months of this 5-year experiment so far, I:

  • consult (10.3%)
  • connect with people (5.0%)
  • write (3.0%)
  • draw (2.5%)
  • cook (2.3%)
  • bike (2.0%)
  • work on Emacs (1.2%) and
  • work on Quantified Awesome and other tracking tools (1%)

Data! Mwahahaha…