Fuzzy brain; also Ni No Kuni

Low energy both physically and mentally today, but I managed to squeeze in a 90-minute walk that included the library and the supermarket, so my walking streak continues. I can feel the fuzziness start to encroach, so ah well. Time to indulge a little. Aside from the walk and the usual chores, in fact, I spent practically the entire day playing Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch.

I like playing role-playing games, particularly ones that are forgiving enough to let you restart or change your mind if a battle’s too much for you. I enjoy watching the story unfold, and I like slowly getting the hang of the battle system and character development.

I prefer turn-based games like Persona 4 Golden where you have a little time to review the situation and think about what you’re going to do. But Ni no Kuni is such a pretty game – gorgeous visuals and sound (Studio Ghibli! the Tokyo Philharmonic!) – that I’m working on getting the hang of the real-time battle system. I expect the game to take me a while, though. This is good, because I happen to have said while.

There are many things I could do with my time, and I’m sure they’ll rise higher on my list after I settle in. There’ll be time enough for other things.

Mapping knowledge

I chatted with someone about maps and personal knowledge management, so I thought I’d write an extended reflection.

2015-05-13e Mapping knowledge for yourself and others -- index card #mapping #pkm #sharing

2015-05-13e Mapping knowledge for yourself and others – index card #mapping #pkm #sharing

Mapping is useful for myself and for others. For managing my own learning:

  • Scope: What’s included, and what’s not? How does this relate to other things I’ve learned or I’m learning?
  • Landmarks and destinations: Role models, motivation, tracking progress…
  • Main path, detours: How do you get from A to B? Are there interesting places in the neighbourhood?
  • Here there be dragons, places under construction: Managing appropriate difficulty; tracking areas to explore or revisit

When helping other people learn, mapping lets me:

  • Define scope: Define a manageable chunk, and link to related maps: zooming in, zooming out, going to other places
  • Provide landmarks
  • Main path, detours: Organize a reasonable path (particularly based on someone’s interests) and nice detours
  • Here there be dragons / construction: Warn newbies, encourage intermediate/advanced exploration

So here’s my current workflow:

2015-05-13f Mapping what I know -- index card #workflow #blogging #index-cards #mapping #pkm

2015-05-13f Mapping what I know – index card #workflow #blogging #index-cards #mapping #pkm

2015-05-08c Managing my structured information -- index card #pkm #knowledge #sharing

2015-05-08c Managing my structured information – index card #pkm #knowledge #sharing

Using index cards, outlines, and chunks seems to be working well for me in terms of current thinking, although I haven’t been turning my attention to organizing, fleshing out knowledge, and filling in gaps.

Here are some notes from 2013 on mapping forwards (plans) and backwards (guides for other people). I’ve figured out ways around some of the challenges I encountered before:

  • Rough categorization of blog posts: I’ve written some Emacs Lisp code to help me update my blog post index monthly.
  • Hundreds of sketches with few links: Now I have more than a thousand sketches! But that’s okay, I have metadata in the filename, integration in my outline, and eventual chunking into blog posts.
  • Duplicate metadata entry, no synchronization: Tags in the filename and a NodeJS script that sets the same tags on Flickr upload, yay
  • No clear picture of follow-up questions, ideas, or actions: Outline still needs work; maybe also a quick way to review open sketches?
  • No clear role models: Found historical and contemporary ones, yay!

Mostly I’ve been focusing on little explorations rather than map-making. It’s like collecting nature specimens so that I can start to classify them, since you don’t see that order until later. Sometimes I look back and retrace my path. That’s when I can try to figure out where things are and how people might go a little faster or in a better order. Other times, when I’m looking forward, I’m trying to see what’s close by and how to get there. I remind myself of the landmarks in the distance, too, and what progress might look like. But I can only walk the routes until I reach a height that lets me review the paths ahead, so sometimes it’s just the accumulation of steps…

2015-05-12d What do I want to get from my blog archive, looking back twenty years from now -- index card #blogging #pkm #archive

2015-05-12d What do I want to get from my blog archive, looking back twenty years from now – index card #blogging #pkm #archive

2015-05-12e What do I want from my archive of index cards -- index card #pkm #archive #drawing #index-cards

2015-05-12e What do I want from my archive of index cards – index card #pkm #archive #drawing #index-cards

What do I want instead of or in addition to advice roundups?

I occasionally get requests for advice to include in an “expert roundup.” It’s one of those quick content generation / search-engine optimization techniques, and often goes something like this:

  1. Cold-email a bunch of famous and not-so-famous people who likely have opinions on something.
  2. Ask them for a quick answer to a simple question. Famous people probably already have soundbites ready to go, so it’s easy for them to reply.
  3. Reach out to more people and name-drop the famous people who have already responded.
  4. Other people feel flattered to be included in that kind of company, and add their own perspectives.
  5. Paste and format the quotes, add pictures or relevant stock images, and use a list-type headline.

If you’re lucky, those people will drop by your blog, read other posts, and maybe even comment or subscribe. If you’re really lucky, they’ll link to your post (“Look! I’m featured over here!”), which is good for broadening your audience and improving your reputation with search engines. Besides, your other readers will be able to read a post that indirectly demonstrates your social capital (“I got Bigname Expert to reply to me”) while possibly offering something to think about. (Although I don’t think it’s really the lack of advice that holds people back…)

On the plus side, at least an e-mail-based soundbite survey requires a little bit more effort than making a grab-bag of quotes harvested from one of the categories of those popular quotation marks (often misattributed and almost never with source links). So there’s something to be said for that. I still prefer posts that have more of the self infused into them, though, whether they’re the products of personal research and interpretation or (better yet) personal experience and insight.

2015-05-13k Fleshing out advice -- index card #blogging #advice #sharing

2015-05-13k Fleshing out advice – index card #blogging #advice #sharing

But it’s much easier to write the first two types of posts rather than the third and fourth type of post. It takes less time. It seems less self-centred. It’s more generally applicable. You could even write books following that formula.

2015-05-14b How are short quotes or excerpts useful for me -- index card #blogging #sharing #perspective

2015-05-14b How are short quotes or excerpts useful for me – index card #blogging #sharing #perspective

And if I think about it from the reader’s perspective, I can actually work to extract a little bit of value from stuff like that. Sometimes, when reading lists or blog posts, I come across an interesting name for a concept I’ve been having a hard time defining or expressing. The keywords help me search more. Other times, a short paragraph is enough to get me considering a different perspective, or thinking about the difference between what it says and what I want to say. Pithy sayings get me thinking about what makes something a memorable maxim. Noticing a collection of intriguing thoughts from one person can lead me to dig up more details on that person. And then there’s always the satisfaction of finding unexpected resonance or an authority you can enlist on your side (the more ancient, the better)…

Still, I want to see people apply the ideas and share their experiences. I want people to share what they struggled with and how they adapted things to fit their situation. Sure, it’s interesting to hear what Aristotle’s purported to have said (although that collection certainly does not include “Excellennce, then, is not an act, but a habit” – that’s Will Durant ccommenting on Aristotle), but it’s also interesting–possibly even more so–to hear what thoughts people distill from their own lives.

Most advice (especially for generic audiences) sounds pretty straightforward. Things like: Spend less than you earn. Live mindfully. Get rid of unnecessary tasks and things. But the challenge of change is hardly ever about hearing these things, is it? I think, if we want to make it easier for people to grow, it’s better to help people flesh out who they want to be, feel they can become that, and see how they can set themselves up for success and appreciate their progress.

A reflection on reading advice: I notice that I’ve grown to like books that dig into personal experience (especially if they avoid the trap of generalization) and books that interpret results from large research studies, but I feel less enlightened by books that rely on anecdotes (cherry-picked, possibly even modified). Since it seems pretty difficult to nail down reliable effects in psychological studies and it’s tempting to cherry-pick research too, that probably indicates that I should dig deeper into finding people with similarly open, experimental approaches to life, which probably means focusing on blogs rather than books. Hmm…

So that’s what I’ve been thinking as a reader. On the other side of the page, as a writer and a learner, what do I think about sharing advice?

Writing from my own life, I realize that I can hardly generalize from my life to other people’s lives: no “You should do this”, but rather, “This seems to work pretty well for me. You might want to consider it, but maybe something else will work even better for you. If so, I’d love to hear about that!” So I don’t have much in the way of generic advice that I can contribute to these advice round-ups.

2015-05-14a What do I do that people often balk at -- index card #advice #yeahbut #different

2015-05-14a What do I do that people often balk at – index card #advice #yeahbut #different

In fact, thinking about some of the things I do that people have both expressed an interest in doing and have struggled with – even when I’m talking one-on-one with people who are half-open to the idea, it’s difficult to help them get over that first hump. Blogging, Emacs, tracking, mindsets… There’s some kind of an activation threshold. People tell me that sometimes hearing from people like me or others about what it’s like helps them resolve to go for it, but that’s not the majority of the push. Anyway, once people get past that, I like swapping notes: not really as a teacher, but as a peer.

Mm. Trade-off, but I think I can deal with it. I can write as a way to bring out the people who resonate. I can skip doling out advice until much later (if at all). Questions from other people are good ways to prompt further reflection, and ongoing blog relationships with people who post their thoughts are even better. It might take time to build that, but it’ll probably be interesting!

Weekly review: Week ending May 15, 2015

This was the week of lots of walking. With my bike out of commission for the moment (need to fix one of the brake lines) and having resolved that walking is actually a really good use of my time, I decided to see how far I could walk with a target of 10,000 steps. I’ve comfortably beat that target each day I’ve had it. As it turns out, Hacklab is within that walking range (at least one-way), so that means I can just walk over there on Tuesdays. =)

Other stuff: family get-togethers and conversations, an Emacs hangout, a chat about personal knowledge management, and a new top in cotton lawn…

2015-05-18a Week ending 2015-05-15 -- index card #journal #weekly output

Blog posts

Sketches

Focus areas and time review

  • Business (33.5h – 19%)
    • Earn: E1: 1-2 days of consulting
    • Earn (6.9h – 20% of Business)
    • Build (20.3h – 60% of Business)
      • Drawing (14.4h)
      • Paperwork (1.0h)
    • Connect (6.4h – 19% of Business)
  • Relationships (8.2h – 4%)
    • Holiday get-together with W-‘s family
    • Hang out with Gabriel
  • Discretionary – Productive (18.8h – 11%)
    • Emacs (2.0h – 1% of all)
      • Work on menu planning in Emacs
    • Fix subscription page
    • Research Quantified Self
    • Sew prepare cotton lawn top
    • Integrate journal with review
    • Verify Jen’s public key by calling
    • Writing (5.7h)
  • Discretionary – Play (7.1h – 4%)
  • Personal routines (23.0h – 13%)
  • Unpaid work (14.7h – 8%)
  • Sleep (62.6h – 37% – average of 8.9 per day)

Laptops and lap cats

If I sit on the couch, it doesn’t take long before one of our three cats decides my lap is a much nicer place to hang out than wherever they were before.

If I pre-empt them by keeping my laptop on my lap, they’ll try to squeeze in between my keyboard and me anyway. I could ignore them and keep typing, but it’s kinda nice when the cats decide to spend time with me (even if I suspect they’re just using me as a soft radiator).

2015-05-04f Laptops and lap cats -- index card #life #cats

2015-05-04f Laptops and lap cats – index card #life #cats

Since this occurs fairly regularly, I’ve given it some thought. Here’s what I’ve come up with:

2015-03-12b On cats and laps -- index card #life #cats

2015-03-12b On cats and laps – index card #life #cats

My effective typing speed when I’m trying to explore a thought is around 16 words per minute, so I don’t lose much by typing on my phone instead of my laptop. It would help to keep a USB charger within easy reach, though. Sometimes I switch my tablet PC to tablet mode and draw on the side, or hand-write things.

One of our cats can be tempted off a lap when someone else gets up off the couch and leaves a warm spot. This is good to know, because she’s the one who occasionally digs in with her claws if you try to prematurely shoo her off your lap. We’ve also discovered that she can be persuaded to leave your lap if you angle yourself out very slowly, but she’ll complain a lot along the way.

I’ve tried just cuddling the cats until they decide they’ve had enough. Sometimes they’ll get a little pointy while still insisting on staying in your lap. Also, one of our cats doesn’t actually have an upper limit to cuddling and will happily fall asleep on your lap, so…

Shifts in my writing

Sometimes, when I sit down to draw my five index cards of the day, I have a hard time delineating five interesting thoughts – things I want to remember or share. They often seem so inward-turned.

I was thinking about the shape of my blog, too. I feel like I’ve shifted from a lot of technical posts to a lot of reflective posts. Possibly less interesting for other people, but useful to me. It’s hard to tell. These are the kinds of posts I’ve been starting to find useful in other people’s blogs, anyway, so who knows? Maybe these things are interesting for other people too.

It’s wonderful to be able to flip back through my archive and see the patterns over time. Of the 2,800+ posts in my index as of April 2015, I’d classify around 170 as mostly reflective. (Totally quick classification, just eyeballing the titles and categories in my index.) Here’s the breakdown:

Year Reflections
2008 4
2009 9
2010 20
2011 7
2012 25
2013 20
2014 59
2015 25
Grand Total 169

While writing a recent post, I searched my archives to trace the evolution of my understanding of uncertainty over several years. I can remember not having these snapshots of my inner world. When I reviewed ten years of blog posts in preparation for compiling Stories from My Twenties in 2013, I was surprised by how many technical and tip-related blog posts I skipped in favour of keeping the memories and the questions, and the sense of things missing from my memories. Maybe that’s why I wrote almost three times the number of reflective posts in 2014 as I did in the previous year. 2014 was also the year I switched the focus of my experiment from other-work to self-work, and that might have something to do with it too. I’m glad I have those thinking-out-loud, figuring-things-out posts now.

The end of April was around 33% of the way through the year, so I’m slightly ahead of last year’s reflective-post-density (expected: 20 posts, actual: 25). Comments are rare, but I’ve learned a lot from them.

I’m fascinated by the ten-year journals you can buy in bookstores. They give you ways of bumping into your old selves, noticing the differences. I like the way blogs give me a little bit more space to write, though. =) Here’s a slice of my life going through May 14:

I have shifted. I focus on different things. I like the direction I’m going in. I can imagine, years from now, getting very good at asking questions, describing and naming elusive concepts, and exploring the options. If it seems a little awkward now, that’s just the initial mediocrity I have to get through. Hmm…