Exploring our grocery numbers

Analyzing my grocery data is more challenging than analyzing my time data. There’s a lot more data cleanup needed. I have to figure out obscure line items on old receipts and catch typos in both names and numbers. Then there’s figuring out how much I want to combine different items and how much I want to keep them separate.

For example, milk has different receipt item names depending on the item (size, brand, type) and the store. If I want to know how much we’ve spent on milk, I’ll use the total for all of them. But if I want to get a sense of the price history, it makes sense to track each receipt item type separately. I do this by keeping the receipt name (fixing typos as I review my data) and mapping these receipt names to a friendly name I set for myself. This way, the line “HOMO 4LI” on my receipt gets turned into “Milk” in my report. Come to think of it, maybe I should change it to “Milk, 4 L, Homogenized”…

Categories are handy for reporting too. Because of the ad-hoc way I created receipt item mappings and assigned them to categories, I ended up with inconsistent categorization. Some types of toilet paper were in the Supplies category, and some types were in the Other category. I manually reviewed the category assignments and I think I’ve gotten them sorted out.

Anyway, analyzing my data from 2013-07-01 to 2015-07-01, I see that we spend an average of $80 per week on groceries, which sounds about right. Some of the receipts are missing and there are almost certainly other little errors in the data, but this should give me the overall picture.

I’m still trying to figure out a good way to visualize the data in order to answer the questions I’m curious about, so here are my notes along the way. X axis is date, Y axis is total cost on that day, color is how it compares to the average price it is (lower price than average = blue, higher = orange).

Milk

2015-07-03 20_47_42-sachachua.com_8080_grocery_analysis

Milk consumption is pretty straightforward. Every week, we use around 0.6 bags of milk (~2.4L) – more when J- and her friends are over (teenagers!). The price of milk has stayed at $4.97 per 4L, except for the time we bought a slightly more expensive type of milk (~Oct 2013) and the time in June 2014 when a smaller size was on sale, so we picked up one of those instead.

Eggs

 

We used to buy extra-large eggs, but the supermarket close to us stopped carrying 18-packs of those, so we switched to 18-packs of large eggs instead.

Extra-large eggs

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Large eggs

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The price of large eggs is stable at $4.27 for 18. We use ~11 eggs a week.

Things we buy when they’re on sale

Canned tomatoes

We stock up on canned tomatoes when they go on sale, since they’re easy to store.

2015-07-03 20_50_19-sachachua.com_8080_grocery_analysis

 

We probably use ~3 cans a month. The sale price has drifted up from $0.88 to $0.97, while the regular price is a little bit over $1.50.

Butter

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We haven’t bought butter at full-price in two years. The sale price for unsalted butter tends to be between $2.77 and $3.33, while the regular price is $6+.

Produce

Strawberries

I like strawberries, but I stopped buying them for a long time because they seemed like such an indulgence and the sweetness tended to be hit-or-miss. This year, I gave myself permission to splurge on strawberries in season.

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Bananas

We seem to go through banana phases. When we hit banana overload, we stop for a while.

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The colours here are just due to floating point imprecision. Bananas have actually stayed the same price for the past two years ($1.26/kg).

Apples

We often get gala apples:

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We like picking up ambrosia apples during the rare occasions they’re available. Last winter was a good one for ambrosia apple availability.

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Chicken

Whole chickens

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Lots of whole chickens lately, because of the rotisserie.

Chicken quarters

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Our main protein, although we also buy a fair bit of beef and pork, and chicken drumsticks/thighs when they’re on sale.

There’s more I haven’t explored yet, but I figured I’d put together these little observations along the way. =)

 

 

Emacs Hangout June 2015

Times may be off by a little bit, sorry!

Boo, I accidentally browsed in the Hangouts window before copying the text chat, so no copy of the text chat this time… =|

Weekly review: Week ending June 26, 2015

Lots of sleep this week, and few blog posts in the pipeline. On the plus side, I did manage to get a little coding in – learning how to use BlueMix on one hand, and making an edit-in-place grocery receipt interface on the other. Oh, and SketchUp!

2015-07-02b Week ending 2015-06-26 -- index card #journal #weekly

output

2015-07-02b Week ending 2015-06-26 – index card #journal #weekly

Blog posts

Sketches

Focus areas and time review

  • Business (21.7h – 12%)
    • Earn (11.3h – 51% of Business)
      • Earn: E1: 1-2 days of consulting
      • BlueMix training
    • Build (10.4h – 48% of Business)
      • Drawing (4.6h)
      • Paperwork (0.0h)
    • Connect (0.0h – 0% of Business)
  • Relationships (11.1h – 6%)
    • Check on P
  • Discretionary – Productive (4.0h – 2%)
    • Emacs (0.3h – 0% of all)
      • Edit Emacs Hangout video to blur avy-jump demo
    • Organize photos
    • Make better interface for cleaning grocery data
    • Return friendly name in JSON
    • Get data input working again
    • CAD a ramp for the shed
    • Figure out how to run Jasmine tests
    • Get data types management working
    • Writing (1.0h)
  • Discretionary – Play (27.0h – 16%)
  • Personal routines (18.7h – 11%)
  • Unpaid work (11.7h – 6%)
  • Sleep (73.8h – 43% – average of 10.5 per day)

Summer

It definitely feels like summer here. Not quite the dog days yet – there’s still a touch of coolness in the air – but sunshine and warmth, hello!

2015-06-24a Summer -- index card #summer #seasons

2015-06-24a Summer – index card #summer #seasons

On my walks, I often play with superimposing my memories of other seasons on the present. I look at the leafy trees and remember their stark branches, or the buds, or the colours. I feel the breeze slip through my sandals and think of the clomping of winter boots, the security of wellingtons. And then I think of the colour and the warmth and the sun of the present, and I bring all those things together. It’s an interesting thought exercise that makes things even more vibrant. The practice helps me make winters a little bit better too, when I carry the memories of heat and vibrant colours with me.

2015-06-24b What do I want to tweak this summer -- index card #summer #seasons

2015-06-24b What do I want to tweak this summer – index card #summer #seasons

I’ll have only so many summers, after all, so maybe I can learn how to fully enjoy them. I wonder what I’ll tweak this time around. Maybe I’ll focus on eating more fruits and vegetables. I’ve been treating myself to yummy fruits on sale, and sometimes even when they’re regular-price: strawberries, nectarines, peaches… Soon it’ll be time for corn on the cob, then melons.

More sitting in the sunshine or shade, too, with friends or solo. Last year I said yes to more time hanging out in parks, and that was quite enjoyable. =) I wonder if any of the cats will put up with being in a harness if that means they’ll get to sun themselves on the deck…

Notes from helping with physics

J-‘s final exams were last week. We’d been helping her review physics, since she was okay with her other subjects. She solved many of the review questions on her own, and then asked us for help with the ones she didn’t know how to do. I was surprised to discover that I remembered enough of kinematics and other topics to be helpful (and to enjoy helping). Yay! =)

We walked her through solving the problems that stumped her. Lots of math and science problem solving is about pattern recognition: seeing how the problem you’re working on is similar to other things you’ve already done (possibly with help), and adapting your experience to the current situation. Having someone sketch out a map and provide quick feedback can make studying a much more productive and less frustrating experience.

Here are some notes on the sub-skills involved:

2015-06-15b Notes from helping with physics -- index card #physics #math #tutoring #j- #family #science #teaching #school

2015-06-15b Notes from helping with physics – index card #physics #math #tutoring #j- #family #science #teaching #school

Algebra’s a big one. I’m not sure how you can develop fluency in that aside from practice and different ways of exploring it. Practising this seems pretty low on the priority list once homework’s finished and even lower priority during vacations. On the other hand, it’s hard to cram understanding when the pressure’s on. I think either John Mighton’s The End of Ignorance or The Myth of Ability had some tips on helping people develop a more intuitive understanding of algebra.

On a related note, there’s also the challenge of translating a word problem into the appropriate math, especially when multiple parts or equations are involved. Maybe we can think out loud more often, modeling the real-world applications of this skill.

There are the usual small mistakes related to doublechecking one’s work or getting the units straight, but she’ll get the hang of that.

J- will be taking more physics, chemistry, and biology next term, so it might be good to do a bit of this review during the summer. In general, I get the impression that she’s doing pretty well, especially compared with the rest of her class.

Past, present, and future

It’s moving more slowly than I might like, but I’m learning how to live in the present. I spend a little more time in the future than I probably should and I’m less comfortable in the past than I’d like to be, but those can wait.

2015-06-15e Past-present-future balance -- index card #balance

2015-06-15e Past-present-future balance – index card #balance

I tend to do a lot of planning and anticipation: rough sketches of just-in-case scenarios, extrapolations of ideas and potential decisions. There’s a lot of waiting for some experiments, too. Can’t rush the seeds growing in the garden, can’t accelerate the learning, can’t jump ahead to see the results.

In a sense, I could, if I let the time in between blur instead of slowing it down even more with experiences and reflections. I get the sense that “passing time” is what leads to people waking up and wonder where their life went, though. Better to kick off more parallel experiments and explore more questions.

I’m making myself keep a list of things that I’m not thinking about yet: things that are too far-off or uncertain, things that are waiting for other things. It’s tempting to spend time thinking about those things – that seems more useful than simply playing games – but it can be counterproductive.

Better to live each moment, then, even if it makes life feel slow, too. It’s good to learn how to be, instead of just distracting myself with juggling as many plans as I can.

What is it like? Napping when I’m sleepy, eating when I’m hungry, cooking for the joy of it, reading for pleasure, even playing games. Stretching out on the deck in the sunlight. Enjoying the seedlings for what they are, instead of wondering if they’ll make it all the way to becoming vegetables in a garden of caterpillars and squirrels. This present will pass, too, so I may as well enjoy it.

Besides, the present might be all I have someday, when the future is short and the past is fuzzy. Might as well learn how to live it!