Summer

It definitely feels like summer here. Not quite the dog days yet – there’s still a touch of coolness in the air – but sunshine and warmth, hello!

2015-06-24a Summer -- index card #summer #seasons

2015-06-24a Summer – index card #summer #seasons

On my walks, I often play with superimposing my memories of other seasons on the present. I look at the leafy trees and remember their stark branches, or the buds, or the colours. I feel the breeze slip through my sandals and think of the clomping of winter boots, the security of wellingtons. And then I think of the colour and the warmth and the sun of the present, and I bring all those things together. It’s an interesting thought exercise that makes things even more vibrant. The practice helps me make winters a little bit better too, when I carry the memories of heat and vibrant colours with me.

2015-06-24b What do I want to tweak this summer -- index card #summer #seasons

2015-06-24b What do I want to tweak this summer – index card #summer #seasons

I’ll have only so many summers, after all, so maybe I can learn how to fully enjoy them. I wonder what I’ll tweak this time around. Maybe I’ll focus on eating more fruits and vegetables. I’ve been treating myself to yummy fruits on sale, and sometimes even when they’re regular-price: strawberries, nectarines, peaches… Soon it’ll be time for corn on the cob, then melons.

More sitting in the sunshine or shade, too, with friends or solo. Last year I said yes to more time hanging out in parks, and that was quite enjoyable. =) I wonder if any of the cats will put up with being in a harness if that means they’ll get to sun themselves on the deck…

Notes from helping with physics

J-‘s final exams were last week. We’d been helping her review physics, since she was okay with her other subjects. She solved many of the review questions on her own, and then asked us for help with the ones she didn’t know how to do. I was surprised to discover that I remembered enough of kinematics and other topics to be helpful (and to enjoy helping). Yay! =)

We walked her through solving the problems that stumped her. Lots of math and science problem solving is about pattern recognition: seeing how the problem you’re working on is similar to other things you’ve already done (possibly with help), and adapting your experience to the current situation. Having someone sketch out a map and provide quick feedback can make studying a much more productive and less frustrating experience.

Here are some notes on the sub-skills involved:

2015-06-15b Notes from helping with physics -- index card #physics #math #tutoring #j- #family #science #teaching #school

2015-06-15b Notes from helping with physics – index card #physics #math #tutoring #j- #family #science #teaching #school

Algebra’s a big one. I’m not sure how you can develop fluency in that aside from practice and different ways of exploring it. Practising this seems pretty low on the priority list once homework’s finished and even lower priority during vacations. On the other hand, it’s hard to cram understanding when the pressure’s on. I think either John Mighton’s The End of Ignorance or The Myth of Ability had some tips on helping people develop a more intuitive understanding of algebra.

On a related note, there’s also the challenge of translating a word problem into the appropriate math, especially when multiple parts or equations are involved. Maybe we can think out loud more often, modeling the real-world applications of this skill.

There are the usual small mistakes related to doublechecking one’s work or getting the units straight, but she’ll get the hang of that.

J- will be taking more physics, chemistry, and biology next term, so it might be good to do a bit of this review during the summer. In general, I get the impression that she’s doing pretty well, especially compared with the rest of her class.

Past, present, and future

It’s moving more slowly than I might like, but I’m learning how to live in the present. I spend a little more time in the future than I probably should and I’m less comfortable in the past than I’d like to be, but those can wait.

2015-06-15e Past-present-future balance -- index card #balance

2015-06-15e Past-present-future balance – index card #balance

I tend to do a lot of planning and anticipation: rough sketches of just-in-case scenarios, extrapolations of ideas and potential decisions. There’s a lot of waiting for some experiments, too. Can’t rush the seeds growing in the garden, can’t accelerate the learning, can’t jump ahead to see the results.

In a sense, I could, if I let the time in between blur instead of slowing it down even more with experiences and reflections. I get the sense that “passing time” is what leads to people waking up and wonder where their life went, though. Better to kick off more parallel experiments and explore more questions.

I’m making myself keep a list of things that I’m not thinking about yet: things that are too far-off or uncertain, things that are waiting for other things. It’s tempting to spend time thinking about those things – that seems more useful than simply playing games – but it can be counterproductive.

Better to live each moment, then, even if it makes life feel slow, too. It’s good to learn how to be, instead of just distracting myself with juggling as many plans as I can.

What is it like? Napping when I’m sleepy, eating when I’m hungry, cooking for the joy of it, reading for pleasure, even playing games. Stretching out on the deck in the sunlight. Enjoying the seedlings for what they are, instead of wondering if they’ll make it all the way to becoming vegetables in a garden of caterpillars and squirrels. This present will pass, too, so I may as well enjoy it.

Besides, the present might be all I have someday, when the future is short and the past is fuzzy. Might as well learn how to live it!

Weekly review: Week ending June 19, 2015

I haven’t edited the Emacs Hangout video yet, but I should get around to that sometime this week. Aside from that, the week has been pretty low-key. W- and I picked up LEGO Jurassic World (PS3 and PS Vita) and have been playing it. Galumphing around as a triceratops or smashing things up as a T-rex is surprisingly satisfying.

2015-06-22a Week ending 2015-06-19 -- index card #journal #weekly output

Blog posts

Sketches

Focus areas and time review

  • Business (25.2h – 14%)
    • Earn (9.1h – 36% of Business)
      • Earn: E1: 1-2 days of consulting
    • Build (16.0h – 63% of Business)
      • Drawing (7.7h)
      • Paperwork (1.3h)
      • Amazon search and replace
    • Connect (0.0h – 0% of Business)
      • Chat with Philip C about Quantified Awesome
  • Relationships (8.9h – 5%)
    • Call with new totals
    • Meet M
  • Discretionary – Productive (7.1h – 4%)
    • Emacs (2.3h – 1% of all)
      • Announce Emacs Hangout 2015-06-17
      • Host Emacs Hangout
      • Edit Emacs Hangout video to blur avy-jump demo
    • Writing (2.7h)
    • Add a summary bar chart of category totals
    • Get grunt working again
    • Add history to refiling
    • Add Jurassic Park to my tracker
    • fix sleep track activity
    • fix categories so that it returns empty ones too
    • Convert icicle chart into a sunburst
    • Switch to hierarchical bar chart
    • Add time filter to date
  • Discretionary – Play (22.3h – 13%)
  • Personal routines (27.2h – 16%)
  • Unpaid work (14.6h – 8%)
  • Sleep (62.7h – 37% – average of 9.0 per day)

Moving past getting things done

2015-06-19a Moving past getting things done -- index card #present #mindset #being

2015-06-19a Moving past getting things done – index card #present #mindset #being

When I have a lot of energy, it’s easy to do good things for my consulting clients or on my personal projects. This energizes me further, and so on. This is a good cycle.

When I’m feeling blah, or when I don’t feel like I’m accomplishing interesting things, I tend to feel even more blah – even if I know that the difficulties are temporary, local, and impersonal.

I realized that my feelings about my days tend to be influenced by whether I made progress. This makes sense; there’s even a book about it.

2015-01-07 Sketched Book - The Progress Principle - Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work - Teresa Amabile, Steven Kramer

2015-01-07 Sketched Book – The Progress Principle – Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work – Teresa Amabile, Steven Kramer

While it’s useful to be motivated by progress, I wonder if I can tweak my mind to get better at enjoying life even when it feels cyclic and mundane. Instead of noting just the new, non-routine tasks of the day, I could reflect on whether I’m getting better at routine stuff like self-care – to enjoy being, not just doing.

2015-06-19c The gap between who I am and who I wish I was -- index card #gap #mindset

2015-06-19c The gap between who I am and who I wish I was – index card #gap #mindset

I find it a little difficult to relax into this mindset, though. Part of me is pulled towards the satisfaction of making progress, and I find myself wishing I could be better at that. I could improve my skills. I could make things better at home. I could be more energetic. I could cover more ground.

2015-06-19d Maybe the delta is okay -- index card #gap #mindset

2015-06-19d Maybe the delta is okay – index card #gap #mindset

But then again, maybe the outcomes of this hypothetical self and my current self are not that different. Sure, it would be nice to make all the progress a hypothetical me could make. But whatever’s important can be handled by other people, and whatever’s not important isn’t worth stressing out over. Besides, this path can also be interesting.

So, back to this curious thought. What’s beyond getting things done? I’m learning things that are hard to check off a list: how to forget annoyances and frustrations, how to enjoy ripe fruits and sunshine, how to listen to the moment and the silence. How to embrace squirrel-brain, fuzzy-brain, and foggy-brain, and how to gently fan a spark of interest.

It will be worth it, I think, learning how to sit still. “Don’t just do something, sit there!”, as the flipped phrase go.

When the check-things-off part of myself gets antsy, I code or read for an hour or so. Once it’s satisfied, I explore things with payoffs that are less straightforward.

Another thing I used to be antsier about: The thought “Will I ask good-enough questions? Will I think good-enough thoughts?” intrudes less and less these days. I trust that when I sit down to draw, I’ll notice something I want to explore; and if not, it might be a good time for a walk.

2015-05-10d The best thing I can do with my time -- index card #experiment

2015-05-10d The best thing I can do with my time – index card #experiment

It might be interesting to decide, even if it’s temporary and on faith, that this is the best thing I can do with my time.

2015-06-15g Re-evaluating my experiment failure mode -- index card #experiment #failure #equanimity #premortem #narrative

2015-06-15g Re-evaluating my experiment failure mode – index card #experiment #failure #equanimity #premortem #narrative

On a larger scale, I might even become comfortable with this as the general flavour of my experiment. In the beginning, I identified “5 years and nothing to show for it, not even a good story” as one of my potential issues in my experiment pre-mortem. I feel myself starting to let go of the need for a neat story.

Getting things done is good. There are also other things that are good. I wonder what it’s like to live an awesome life, or better yet: live a life awesomely.

Finding missing dates in PostgreSQL

My analytics numbers were way off from what I expected them to be. When I did a day-by-day comparison of my numbers and the reference set of numbers, I realized that a few weeks of data were missing from the year of data I was analyzing – a couple of days here, two weeks there, and so on. I manually identified the missing dates so that I could backfill the data. Since this was the second time I ran into that problem, though, I realized I needed a better way to catch this error and identify gaps.

Initially, I verified the number of days in my PostgreSQL database table with a SQL statement along the lines of:

SELECT year, month, COUNT(*) AS num_days FROM
(SELECT date_part('year', day_ts) AS year,
 date_part('month', day_ts) AS month,
 day_ts FROM (SELECT DISTINCT day_ts FROM table_with_data) AS temp) AS temp2
ORDER BY year, month

I checked each row to see if it matched the number of days in the month.

It turns out there’s an even better way to look for missing dates. PostgreSQL has a generate_sequence command, so you can do something like this:

SELECT missing_date
FROM generate_series('2015-01-01'::date, CURRENT_DATE - INTERVAL '1 day') missing_date
WHERE missing_date NOT IN (SELECT DISTINCT day_ts FROM table_with_data)
ORDER BY missing_date

Neat, huh?