On this page:
  • Reflecting on goal factoring and akrasia
  • Lion cut - (1)
  • Weekly review: Week ending April 11, 2014 - (2)
  • Monthly review: March 2014
  • Working fast and slow
  • Emacs Chat: Tom Marble - (1)

Reflecting on goal factoring and akrasia

Following up on sketching my goals: I’ve been thinking a bit more about goal factoring. What do I want to be able to do with an overview of my projects and goals?

  • I want to make regular progress towards important goals, especially since I tend to move from topic to topic.
  • I want to translate abstract goals into measurable projects, and I want to translate those projects into actions.
  • I want to brainstorm alternative approaches that may get me to my goals faster, cheaper, or more effectively.
  • I want to see which actions or projects can support multiple goals.
  • I want to prioritize my projects and goals, putting things on the backburner as needed.
2014-03-24 How do I want to keep track of my goals #goal-factoring #planning #org

2014-03-24 How do I want to keep track of my goals #goal-factoring #planning #org

One of the benefits of writing down my goals is that I can look at the gap between plans and reality. An e-mail conversation with Daniel Reeves (Beeminder and the awesomely geeky Messy Matters) pointed me to the concept of akrasia, which is when you act against your better judgment (Wikipedia: akrasia; LessWrong: akrasia). In general, this happens because we value the present much more than the future. Short-term gains are more compelling than future ones. Immediate pains matter more than far-off sacrifices.

I haven’t thought a lot about akrasia yet. If I can understand the concept and identify my akratic actions, then I can change my systems or try other tactics to live better.

2014-03-26 Reflections on akrasia - acting against my better judgment #rationality

2014-03-26 Reflections on akrasia – acting against my better judgment #rationality

  • Sleeping: I could probably get away with sleeping less. That said, it’s good (and uncommon) to get plenty of sleep, so this might not be too bad. I averaged about 8.9 hours a night over the past year. If I manage to tweak this to get, say, 0.5 hours more core time per day, that would be amazing. On the other hand, I could be the sort of person who really does need that much time, and it’s still within the normal range. We’ll see how sleep works out with my changing routines.
  • Reading fanfiction during my commute when I could be reading nonfiction, learning Morse code, writing, or listening to podcasts… Actually, I’ve been doing more Morse code lately, so maybe this is not an issue. And I should probably have more mental downtime anyway.
  • Being glued to my phone: On a related note, W- has teased me about my being occasionally glued to my phone. (It’s funny when I’m trying to tidy up or make the bed one-handed.) This is more of an awareness issue.
  • Not doing enough strength/flexibility/endurance: Biking helps me with lower-body strength, but my arms are weak. If I don’t exercise to maintain my flexibility, I’ll lose it over time. I have plenty of energy throughout the day, although I suppose it’s good to build that up so that I have even more energy for bigger tasks. If I determine that mornings are the best time to exercise, then my lack of exercise is a combination of my desire to spend that time reading or writing (even though I already do this to the point of possible diminishing returns) and my dislike of how it initially feels to exercise.
  • Socializing: I often don’t feel like going out, although I conceptually know that connecting with people is a good thing. I suspect it’s because I feel more connected with people around ideas instead of history or circumstance, and connecting to people over the Internet tends to more reliably result in good conversations like that compared to going to events or get-togethers in person.
  • Crossing my legs: This is an awareness thing. I just have to notice it, and then I can gradually untrain myself. If I’m seated correctly, I’m fine. I tend to cross when I need a higher, slanted surface to draw on. More observations – maybe stochastic?

There are lots of other possibly akratic actions in my life. These came to mind first when I thought about things that I often do and that I can change when I pay attention to them. Still, looking at this set… I don’t have a strong desire to eliminate akrasia while the suboptimal results aren’t major hindrances. I’m fine with having a little slack in my life. Even when my actions diverge from my stated goals, I still learn a lot.

That’s an interesting meta-thing to explore, though. Am I too comfortable? I’ve experimenting with moving away from carrot-and-stick approaches to personal productivity (or taskmaster and slave) and more towards appreciative inquiry (let’s observe what’s working well, and do more of that). Most people want to become more machine-like in their productivity, reliably following their plans. The contrarian in me is curious about alternatives. I don’t know that life would be better if I worked with more focus or commitment. I know that it would be different, and there’s a possibility that following the butterflies of my curiosity also creates value.

So let’s say that akrasia (or at least how I understand it so far) tends to be effectively addressed with self-imposed deadlines, commitment devices, constrained environments, and so on. Writers sign up for NaNoWriMo. Entrepreneurs bet each other that they’ll complete their tasks. Dieters remove junk food from their cupboards. These constraints support progress (by adding enough incentive to get people started or to convert downtime into productive time) or prevent backsliding (by removing temptations and distractions).

What are the trade-offs I make for not using these tools against akrasia? Are there ways I can turn weaknesses into strengths for those approaches?

Commitment devices are good for keeping you focused. If I let myself follow my interests, then I don’t get to take advantage of momentum or compounding results. However, my habit of sharing along the way means that people can get value even from intermediate steps. Cross-pollination is valuable, too. On my personal blog, it’s probably a good idea to have variety instead of focus, so that people can find what they’re interested in.

Commitment devices are good for preventing backsliding. When you make undesired actions more costly (ex: eating junk food), you make desired actions cheaper in comparison (ex: nibbling on carrots). If I don’t tinker with incentives that way, then I’ll be more influenced by short-term effects rather than long-term effects. I am generally future-oriented anyway (ex: retirement savings, batch cooking) and I have fun connecting actions with long-term plans, so the disadvantages may be somewhat mitigated. I don’t have a sense of urgency around this, either. Perhaps I need to exaggerate long-term costs in order to make this more compelling.

Things to think about…

Have you reflected on akrasia? Can you share your insights?

Lion cut

From Sunday: We’d neglected brushing Leia’s coat until there were mats that were difficult to work out. I tried to comb them out with a dematter or snip them out with scissors, but there was only so much Leia would tolerate. So plan B: shave it all off!

2014-04-13 Lion cut

2014-04-13 Lion cut

We had been thinking about it for a few months, but we figured she probably wanted to keep her fur during winter. With warm weather on the horizon and the mats getting thicker, it was time. W- and I didn’t know what to expect. We looked up pictures of lion cuts on cats (hilarious!), watched videos (of which there are plenty on the Internet, which exists primarily for the dissemination of all things cat-related), and read forum posts (for example: my cat is shaved & depressed).

Then we took Leia to her first appointment with a cat groomer. Leia wasn’t too happy during the process. The groomer had to use the Cone of Don’t Bite Me. There was a lot of… err… expressiveness.

She cheered up all right afterwards, though. We made sure to reassure her with lots of cuddles, although it took us a good few hours before we could resist the urge to chortle whenever we looked at her.

Actually, no, still happens. <giggle> She’s tinier than I expected! I always thought she was the same size as Luke, but it turns out that was all hair. She’s actually the same size as Neko. Maybe even smaller. Boggle. And her head is so big! And she’s wearing boots!

Yep, should totally do this every year.

Weekly review: Week ending April 11, 2014

Updated: Fixed links, thanks furansui!

A lot of coding this past week – moving stuff to Github, fixing bugs, making things a little more convenient… Two Emacs chats, too.

Started gardening again. =D Yay weather warming up!

Next week:

Blog posts

Sketches

I think my focus on sketches is inversely proportional to my focus on code. They probably tickle the same part of my brain…

  1. 2014.04.07 Working fast and slow #experiment

Link round-up

Focus areas and time review

  • Business (40.7h – 24%)
    • [ ] Build: Find a user-friendly RSS plugin for WordPress
    • [ ] Earn: E1: 2.5-3.5 days of consulting
    • [ ] Explore converting ClojureBridge tutorial to Org
    • [ ] Explore membership plugins / course plugins
    • [ ] Record session on learning keyboard shortcuts
    • [ ] Write about planning for reasonable safety
    • Earn (16.7h – 41% of Business)
      • [X] E1 Unpinkify
      • [X] E1: Check for subscribers
      • [X] E1: Load people into comm
      • [X] Earn – E2: Re-render video 3 if necessary
      • [X] Earn – E2: Set up video 3?
      • [X] Earn: E1: 2.5-3.5 days of consulting
    • Build (20.8h – 51% of Business)
      • [X] Check that all my WordPress installations are up to date
      • [X] Get Emacs to show me a month of completed tasks, organized by project
      • [X] Improve Emacs Beeminder
      • [X] Make it easier to cross-link Org
      • [X] Package miniedit for MELPA?
      • [X] Run Hello World in Clojure from Emacs
      • [X] Sort out cache slam
      • [X] Sort out task templates and captures so that refiling, jumping, and clocking is easy
      • [X] Stop loading d3js
      • Drawing (1.5h)
      • Delegation (1.2h)
        • [X] Post Emacs tutorials links
      • Packaging (7.4h)
        • [X] Fix cover for Sketchnotes 2012
        • [X] Annotate my Emacs configuration
        • [X] Draw “A” page for Emacs ABCs
        • [X] Draft guide to getting started with Emacs Lisp
        • [X] Learn about bitbooks
        • [X] Review Sketchnotes 2012 digital proof
      • Paperwork (0.5h)
        • [X] File payroll return
        • [X] Plan my business and personal finances
    • Connect (3.2h – 7% of Business)
      • [X] Emacs Chat: Tom Marble
      • [X] Emacs chat prep: Iannis
      • [X] Emacs chat: Iannis Zannos – music
      • [X] Invite technomancy for an Emacs Chat
  • Relationships (12.9h – 7%)
    • [X] Attend W-’s family thing
    • [X] Check results for project F
    • [X] Get the Raspberry Pi camera working and get a top-down view
    • [X] Go to RJ White’s semi-retirement party
    • [X] Set up the Pi camera again
    • [ ] Raspberry Pi: Use bounding rectangle to guess litterbox use
    • [ ] Raspberry Pi: Extract blob pixels and try to classify cats
  • Discretionary – Productive (18.0h – 10%)
    • [X] Flesh out story
    • [X] Write monthly report taking advantage of Org tasks
    • [ ] Blog about user-visible improvements, Beeminder commit goal
    • [ ] Experiment with calculating ve
    • [ ] Plant beets, spinach, lettuce
    • [ ] Ask neighbours if anyone wants to split a bulk order of compost with us
    • Writing (5.9h)
      • [X] Write about discretionary speed
  • Discretionary – Play (2.8h – 1%)
  • Personal routines (21.5h – 12%)
  • Unpaid work (11.7h – 6%)
  • Sleep (61.2h – 36% – average of 8.7 per day)

Monthly review: March 2014

Last month, I:

  • had fun with Emacs
    • coded numerous little Emacs conveniences
    • learned how to make graphs in Org Mode: see http:sachachua.com/evil-plans
    • integrated Emacs Org Mode with Quantified Awesome
    • helped lots of people with Emacs
    • started the Emacs Basics video series
    • set up more Emacs chats
  • and geeked around with other things
    • started playing around with the Raspberry Pi, motion detection, and image processing with simplecv
    • learned more about NodeJS
    • upgraded to Ubuntu Precise, Ruby 2.0
    • went to Gamfternoon at Hacklab
  • drew a little
    • finally updated my Twitter background
    • lined up another sketchnoting gig
    • put together the print version of Sketchnotes 2013, yay LaTeX!
  • and took care of other stuff
    • filed our taxes
    • delegated more writing

In other news, I really like the new monthly review code I’ve added to Emacs: http:sachachua.com/dotemacs#monthly-reviews

Here’s the snippet:

(defun sacha/org-review-month (start-date)
  "Review the month's clocked tasks and time."
  (interactive (list (org-read-date)))
  ;; Set to the beginning of the month
  (setq start-date (concat (substring start-date 0 8) "01"))
  (let ((org-agenda-show-log t)
        (org-agenda-start-with-log-mode t)
        (org-agenda-start-with-clockreport-mode t)
        (org-agenda-clockreport-parameter-plist '(:link t :maxlevel 3)))
    (org-agenda-list nil start-date 'month)))

In April, I want to:

  • Record and set up more Emacs chats
  • Make open source contribution part of my routine (mailing lists, patches, sharing)

Blog posts

Working fast and slow

When it comes to personal projects, when does it make sense to work quickly and when does it make sense to work slowly? I’ve been talking to people about how they balance client work with personal projects. It can be tempting to focus on client work because that comes with clear tasks and feedback. People’s requests set a quick pace. For personal projects, though, the pace is up to you.

It’s easy to adopt the same kinds of productivity structures used in the workplace. You can make to-do lists and project plans. You can set your own deadlines. I want to make sure that I explore different approaches, though. I don’t want to just settle into familiar patterns.

2014-04-07 Working fast and slow #experiment

2014-04-07 Working fast and slow #experiment

I work on personal projects more slowly than I work on client projects. When I work on client tasks, I search and code and tweak at a rapid speed, and it feels great to get a lot of things done. My personal projects tend to be a bit more meandering. I juggle different interests. I reflect and take more notes.

Probably the biggest difference between client work and personal projects is that I tend to focus on one or two client tasks at a time, and I let myself spread out over more personal projects. I cope with that by publishing lots of little notes along the way. The notes make it easier for me to pick up where I left off. They also let other people learn from intermediate steps, which is great for not feeling guilty about moving on. (Related post: Planning my learning; it’s okay to learn in a spiral)

Still, it’s good to examine assumptions. I assume that:

  • doing this lets me work in a way that’s natural to me: what if it’s just a matter of habit or skill?
  • it’s okay to be less focused or driven in my learning, because forcing focus takes effort: it’s probably just the initial effort, though, and after that, momentum can be useful
  • combinations of topics can be surprisingly interesting or useful: are they really? Is this switching approach more effective than a serial one or one with larger chunks?
  • a breadth-first approach is more useful to me than a depth-first one: would it help to tweak the depth for each chunk?
2014-04-02 On thinking about a variety of topics - a mesh of learning #my-learning

2014-04-02 On thinking about a variety of topics – a mesh of learning #my-learning

One of my assumptions is that combining topics leads to more than the sum of the parts. I took a closer look at what I write about and why. What do I want from learning and sharing? How can I make things even better?

2014-04-02 Evaluating my sharing #sharing #decision

2014-04-02 Evaluating my sharing #sharing #decision

Emacs tinkering is both intellectually stimulating and useful to other people. It also works well with applied rationality, Quantified Self, and other geekery. I can align sketchnoting by focusing on technical topics and  on making it easier to package things I’ve learned. Blogging and packaging happen to be things I’ve been learning about along the way. Personal finance is a little disconnected from other topics, but we’ll see how this experiment with the Frugal FIRE show works out.

If I had to choose one cluster of topics, though, it would be the geek stuff. I have the most fun exploring it, and I am most interested in the conversations around it.

What does that mean, then? Maybe I’ll try the idea of a learning sprint: to focus all (or almost all) my energies on one topic or project each week. I can work up to it gradually, starting with 2-4 hour blocks of time.

2014-04-02 Imagining learning sprints #my-learning

2014-04-02 Imagining learning sprints #my-learning

Because really, the rate-limiting factor for my personal projects is attention more than anything else. If I experiment with reducing my choices (so: Emacs basics, Emacs chats, open source, Quantified Self), that will probably make it easier to get the ball rolling.

2014-03-28 Identifying rate-limiting factors in my work #kaizen

2014-03-28 Identifying rate-limiting factors in my work #kaizen

So I’m still not adopting the taskmaster approach, but I’m reminding myself of a specific set of areas that I want to explore, gently guiding the butterflies of my interest down that way.

We’ll see how it works out!

Emacs Chat: Tom Marble

Emacs Chat: Tom Marble – Invoicing with Org and LaTeX; Clojure

Guest: Tom Marble

Tom Marble’s doing this pretty nifty thing with Org Mode, time tracking, LaTeX, and invoice generation. Also, Clojure + Emacs, and other good things. Enjoy!

For the event page, you may click here.

Want just the audio? Get it from archive.org: MP3

Check out Emacs Chat for more interviews like this. Got a story to tell about how you learned about or how you use Emacs? Get in touch!