Thinking about my frequency of annual reviews

I’ve been doing annual reviews a few times a year: my birthday in August, the new year in January, and experiment-related reflections in February. It’s a little excessive, perhaps. My weekly and monthly reviews make it easy enough to summarize events over 12 months, so it’s not that much more effort to do a new review with a slight offset.

The experiment review has different guide questions, so that’s useful. The birthday and new year reviews have a lot of overlap, though. What happened? How am I different? What did I learn? What did I forget and want to relearn? What worked well? What do I want to focus on next? What could make this even better? The two reviews cover the same ground, especially since I don’t do New Year’s Resolutions. I like the birthday review because it’s anchored on things that are meaningful to me, and paced according to my life.

The new year review would probably be better suited to reflecting on external influences, since that’s synchronized with other people’s reviews, but external events don’t seem to matter that much to me when I reflect on my year.

People often use the Christmas/New Year break to send out family updates and pictures. Both my family and W-‘s family like taking family pictures, so we’re covered there. I feel somewhat odd about the idea of announcing things on behalf of W- or A-, or getting W- to contribute. I’m more comfortable capturing the changes in my own life, noting the occasional highlight from theirs – but with my individual voice, not a collective We. I think of it more for personal note-taking and celebration (and maybe the occasional acquaintance catching up through my archives) rather than pushing updates to a list of people whom I think should hear about our year. Opt-in is more comfortable for me than opt-out. I’m probably making it more complicated than it needs to be, but I wonder if there’s a thought in here that’s worth untangling…

I wonder how I mentally chunk my memories. Do I think of them in terms of ages: my 20s, etc.? Do I think in terms of calendar years? Years come to mind more easily than ages do when I think about milestones such as coming to Canada. So maybe that’s an argument for keeping the new year review…

There’s also the benefit of being able to send people a link to a tidy summary when they wish me a happy new year, although that happens more around birthdays anyway.

Hmm. I guess I’ll try to squeeze another annual review in this month, and then I can reconsider the question in August. More writing is good, anyway.

Reflecting on my process for visual journaling

Over several nursing sessions, I flipped through all 750+ of my sketches from 2016 on my phone. It was a quick and wonderful overview of the past year. It’s amazing to see how much ground we’d covered one day at a time.

Taking 5-10 minutes at night to draw a visual journal worked out well. It was my second year with daily/weekly/monthly sketches, and my workflow held up to the demands of caring for a newborn. Some nights I fell asleep before A- let me sneak away, but the text notes I jotted throughout the day helped me reconstruct events even after several nights. I really liked having a record not just of what happened, but also what I was thinking about, and the little moments that would have been hard to capture in a picture. When we were dealing with lots of uncertainty, thinking out loud helped me untangle my thoughts and feel like things were manageable. Looking back over the past year, I think I like the person I was and the person I’ve grown to be.

I didn’t have much time or energy to dress up my sketches or go beyond a simple style. It was nice to see the sketches I spent some time colouring for presentation, though, and the drawing practice I occasionally indulged in. My copies of characters from the books I read to A- reminded me of those stories, and rough sketches of her (mostly sleeping, since that was the only time I could draw from life) made me smile. I think I’d like to make more time for drawing, not just capturing thoughts.

Still, it was so useful to have a tool for making sense of my fragmented thoughts. There was so much to figure out about parenting, time, uncertainty, anxiety, boundaries, philosophy, plans…
I found it easy to go through my sketches and remember what it was like at that point in time. Sometimes I wasn’t sure what a cryptic note on my sketch meant, especially if I didn’t cover it in my weekly review, but that’s okay.

I’m looking forward to continuing this habit in 2017. I’ve been experimenting with jotting down sketch ideas on my phone, so I can move more of the thinking out of my limited computer time. I’d like to make sure I play with more formats than just lists, though, since the nonlinearity of drawing can support thinking in a different way compared to writing. It would be nice to mix in more non-journal sketches, and more actual sketches and drawing exercises too. Maybe a daily cycle, to prompt me to expand…

I still haven’t finished my yearly review, but having all those weekly and monthly sketches sure made the process easier. Onward!

2017-01-09 Emacs News

Links from reddit.com/r/emacs, /r/orgmode, /r/spacemacs, Hacker News, planet.emacsen.org, Youtube, the changes to the Emacs NEWS file, and emacs-devel.

Past Emacs News round-ups

Posting more thoughts

I can write on my phone while nursing, which is probably a far better occupation for my mind instead of scrolling through Facebook or Reddit for the nth time. It’s not my ideal writing setup – I can see around a paragraph or two on the screen at a time, and I don’t have the outlining/linking/figuring-out tools I’m used to on my computer – but it gets me writing in full sentences instead of just jotting down lists. I can capture more thoughts this way, and I don’t have to stay up late to get through my drawing backlog.

It’s important to me to be able to flesh out thoughts a little despite the interruptions of life with a baby. With a place to store these half-finished thoughts, I can make some progress. I’m not trying to write a great novel (or that Emacs book I planned a long time ago) – just exploring thoughts and questions and ideas, and storing hooks for associative memories.

A- nurses a lot, which we’re okay with. More sustenance and comfort for her, and our lives are flexible enough to accommodate it. I focus on her when she wants interaction, and I keep my phone handy for when she seems to be nursing to sleep. It’s a practice I could probably help her get out of, but things are also fine the way they are. I’ll probably let her take the lead on this one, at least for now.

What do I want to think about during these moments?

  • For the present: task lists, decisions, questions, research
  • For weekly and monthly reviews: highlights, memories
  • For future Sacha: sketches of daily life, thoughts, things I’m learning
  • For other people: things I figured out the hard way; counter-intuitive or alternative experiences; ideas and thoughts
  • For family and friends: stories

There are lots of things I can think through and write about, even in small chunks and without tools for structure. I’ll experiment with writing about and posting more of them. After all, my blog started with a few years of random snippets and thoughts. I don’t mind spending a few more years writing about mundane things and incomplete thoughts that might not be of much interest to other people, just in case it might be of interest to my future self. I’ve already set up categories and filtered mailing lists, so people can choose what to read. I can write more for myself, and enjoy what serendipitous conversations come my way. :)

Monthly review: December 2016

After enjoying lots of time with old friends and family, we flew back to Toronto and settled into our household routines. The flights back were a bit more comfortable, thanks to the timing and the rest areas at the Manila and Incheon airports. It took A- and I a few weeks to get over jet lag, since I mostly went by her cues. Short days and cold weather made it harder to reset her circadian rhythm, but we eventually synced up with W-. We even got back into the habit of walking again, once we were mostly lined up with daylight.

One of the unexpected benefits of going on this trip was the realization that congee and bibimbap can be part of our everyday routines, thanks to inexpensive and easily-cooked ingredients. I just need to marinate ground beef or pork in soy sauce, brown it, and keep it in the fridge, and gradually build up a supply of banchan when there’s time. Yum yum yum. W- picked up a container of gochujang, and we’ve been making good progress through it too.

Since we lost A-‘s painted shell, I took A- to be fitted for a clear conformer. This one kept popping out, though – sometimes twice a day, sometimes even when she wasn’t touching it. Eventually we lost it somewhere in the house, which was very mystifying. I’ll be taking her for another one in January. I hope this one fits better, or else I might have to tweak the budget a bit.

On the plus side, A- has gotten the hang of clapping. It’s awesome. She claps for herself, she claps for us, she claps when she wakes up and it’s another nice day… :) She’s also gotten a lot of practice in putting things on top of other things/cats/parents. She likes putting things into and taking things out of baskets, which makes laundry time more interesting. She’s getting more confident about crawling even around the corner and out of sight, and she’s often keen to walk with our help.

W- created a play area in the living room, and we’ve been spending a lot of time in it. New lights and more floor space really changed the feel of the room. We also put up elephant stickers in A-‘s room, which feels a lot more like a nursery now. (W- oiled the hinges, too, so it’s easier to go in and out without worrying about waking her up.)

A- continues to follow the 15th percentile curve in terms of weight. She got the second half of the flu shot, so she’ll probably be okay this season.

We went to Brantford for W-‘s family’s Christmas thing. A- was okay with the long car ride, although we needed to make one stop on the way there so that she could nurse. That was the day we lost her clear conformer, too, so we were a little frazzled. She mostly stayed close to us, although she warmed up enough to explore the gifts and hang out with family.

I did a little bit of consulting, mostly just maintenance. I also did some coding and troubleshooting for my blog. It was a little embarrassing to not have noticed the broken paragraphs for so long, but oh well!

Lots of writing on my phone – the new workflow with Google Tasks seems to be working out well. We’ll see how next month goes!

Blog posts

Sketches

Category Nov Dec Diff h/wk Diff h/wk
Business – Build 0.2 0.7 0.5 1.2 0.8
Discretionary – Play 1.7 2.6 0.9 4.4 1.5
Unpaid work 47.6 43.7 -3.9 75.7 -6.5
Unpaid work – Childcare 37.0 36.3 -0.6 63.0 -1.1
Discretionary – Social 0.3 0.2 -0.1 0.3 -0.2
Discretionary – Family 6.3 2.1 -4.1 3.7 -7.0
Sleep 32.0 35.3 3.4 61.2 5.6
Business – Connect 0.4 0.2 -0.2 0.3 -0.3
Business – Earn 0.6 0.3 -0.3 0.6 -0.5
Discretionary – Productive 2.8 3.1 0.3 5.3 0.5
Personal 8.3 8.1 -0.3 14.0 -0.4

What do I want from my Org Mode files?

What do I want from the notes I keep in Org Mode, how’s that working out, and how can I improve?

Remind me of important tasks, especially recurring ones or ones in the far future
This works pretty well, especially with my weekly review. I mostly trust it, although it might be nice to use the timeline view to review tasks over the next few years just to make sure the important ones are there. And backups!
Keep detailed checklists, instructions, and notes, so that I don’t miss any steps or have to figure things out again when I’m sleep-deprived
I’ve found this useful when dealing with my business paperwork, and I look forward to documenting more routines.
Capture quick thoughts and tasks so that they don’t clutter up my mind
org-capture is good when I’m at my computer, and Google Tasks is a decent inbox when I’m away. Not very good at reviewing and refiling the items, though, but I can do that when I have more discretionary time.
Break bigger projects down into manageable tasks
I don’t have the brainspace right now to work on projects, so most of these have been shelved. I need to tweak my Org refile targets to make organizing things easier. I might be running into a limit with too many targets. Sometimes I can’t use org-refile to select a task that I already know exists.
Help me untangle my thoughts or keep a trail of breadcrumbs as I solve problems
Pretty good at this. Limited by computer time at the moment.
Pull together information and help me summarize
The code I wrote for my weekly and monthly reviews is working well. The code for Emacs News is decent, too, although I can save a little more time if I fix my function for opening all links in a region.
Draft blog posts
This is working well. It could be a little better if I sorted out image uploading and resizing, but my current workflow is fine.
Help me make the most of my limited computer time by prioritizing small tasks that move me forward
This is probably the weakest area. Right now, I tend to prioritize drawing, then checking my agenda for urgent/quick tasks, and maybe writing if I can squeeze it in. I mostly save writing for my phone, though, because I can write on my phone and I can’t do the other tasks then. Coding might help me improve efficiency, but that might have to wait until I have more focused time. It’s okay, I’ll get back to that someday. I think getting better at writing and posting will pay off well enough in the short term. If I give myself permission to post short, possibly incomplete thoughts (like I tell people to! :) ), I’ll get more stuff out there, and then I can build up from there.
Keep notes on people
Little memories, triggers for thoughtfulness, etc. I’m definitely the bottleneck here, not Org.
Help me review my decisions
It’s good to write down goals, options considered, criteria, trade-offs, reasons, predicted results, and so on. My bottleneck is probably taking the time to do so. People are good at rationalization, so I’m not trying to judge whether something was a good decision or a bad decision, but it’s interesting to see what decisions and evaluations reveal about my preferences and values.
Remind me about tools, how to use them, why, and so on
This is partly why I have a literate configuration – so the outline can remind me about stuff I’ve already coded. It’s also handy to keep track of commands and scripts that help me with various tasks. I just need to remember to copy and paste stuff as I do things.

Overall, I’m okay with input and output. Processing is my bottleneck at the moment. If I either fix that org-refile issue I’ve been running into, or come up with an alternative flexible search that will help me find outline entries when I don’t quite remember the headline, that should make processing a bit easier. A bit of outline gardening would help, too – archiving things that are no longer relevant, refiling notes and improving their headlines/text for searchability, maybe prioritizing tasks based on costs and benefits… I’m not entirely sure I’d be comfortable doing that on my phone, so it will have to wait for computer time.

In the meantime, I’m glad I have a place to accumulate (and eventually organize) all those notes!