On this page:
  • Weekly review: Week ending October 10, 2014
  • Monthly review: September 2014
  • Leveling up in cooking - (2)
  • Questionnaires from people
  • Becoming a better reader - (2)
  • Level up! Making IKEA-compatible shelves - (2)

Weekly review: Week ending October 10, 2014

Passed another big milestone at work. Yay! Now in the winding-down phase. How exciting! Next week has a bunch of celebrations (Thanksgiving and work). Also, more kitchen things… =)

Blog posts

Sketches

Link round-up

Focus areas and time review

  • Business (56.7h – 33%)
    • Earn (38.2h – 67% of Business)
      • Earn: E1: Help with milestone
      • E1: Attend celebrations
      • Earn: E1: 2.5-3.5 days of consulting
    • Build (14.1h – 24% of Business)
      • Drawing (6.6h)
      • Delegation (0.0h)
      • Packaging (0.0h)
      • Paperwork (4.8h)
        • Consider upgrading Quickbooks
        • Deduct personal use of phone
        • Do quick method for HST
        • File HST return
        • Finalize accounts
        • Update Paypal amounts and save invoices
        • Update second savings account
    • Connect (4.5h – 7% of Business)
      • Chat with other QS Toronto organizers
  • Relationships (2.2h – 1%)
    • Make shelves for cabinet
    • Pick up extra shelf pins from IKEA
    • Picnicked in High Park, yay
    • Go to Thanksgiving thing
    • Make egg tarts
    • Get more kitchen things
    • Repackage spices in mason jars
  • Discretionary – Productive (3.8h – 2%)
    • Emacs (0.0h – 0% of all)
    • Clear out planters
    • Reducing my consulting
    • Buy parka and raincoat
    • Get passport pictures
    • Start working on kitchen organizer
    • [#C] Tracking: Update the number of tasks
    • Writing (2.1h)
  • Discretionary – Play (10.3h – 6%)
  • Personal routines (21.6h – 12%)
  • Unpaid work (16.5h – 9%)
  • Sleep (56.9h – 33% – average of 8.1 per day)

Monthly review: September 2014

I wrote last month that in September, I was planning to:

  • Do more consulting (big milestone!)
  • Help with Hacklab move

It took lots of long days and late nights, but we did a great job on the major project I was working on in September. Woohoo! I got to use AutoHotkey, NodeJS, and AngularJS in interesting ways, and I helped out a different team too.

Hacklab is now at 1266 Queen Street West, and it’s shaping up nicely. I set aside some money to help with kitchen things and with the move. It was good to help with that and to get to know the other folks at Hacklab.

In October, I’m planning to:

  • Help with the last big milestone for my consulting client
  • Turn over all of my responsibilities and document things I’ve learned
  • Cook at the new Hacklab and explore more recipes at home
  • Do my corporate books: this year, I added dividends and HST quick method!

Blog posts

Sketches

Leveling up in cooking

I made sweet potato and miso soup yesterday, with popped wild rice and Caesar salad on the side. W- made garlic bread with the baguette I bought. It was yummy. The other day, I helped make butternut squash and sweet potato soup at Hacklab, and that was well-received as well. Yay!

Five years ago, before we discovered bulk cooking and bought a chest freezer, W- used to cook every 1-2 days. I didn’t know a lot of dishes that I could confidently cook and he was so much better at cooking than I was, so I was the sous chef. I helped prepare ingredients, make rice, and cook simple recipes. He’d come home early to make dinner, and we packed leftovers for lunch the next day.

Now I cook most of our experimental meals, trying new recipes in the search for future favourites. I also enjoy refilling the chest freezer with time-tested meals like chicken curry and shake-and-bake chicken. Our next goal is to work out a good rotation of known favourites, sprinkling in new recipes here and there.

It feels great to be able to cook–and to take charge of the kitchen, which is an interesting experience. I’m usually trying recipes for the first time, or experimenting with a new variant of a recipe that we’ve had before. I’m never quite sure how it will work out, but since we have backups (hooray for leftovers and low expectations!), it’s okay to stretch and learn. Besides, with all these years ahead of me (probably), the more exploration I do now, the more it will pay off in terms of skills and knowledge.

So probably every Tuesday or so, I’ll be learning a new recipe (helping out at Hacklab). Two or three times a week, I’ll also try a new recipe at home – maybe Wednesday and Sunday, or something like that. I’m also working on rediscovering old favourites and writing them down in the shared Evernote notebook I’ve set up with W-, and maybe transitioning to a grocery/recipe system I’m building for the two of us.

Nice to have a kitchen and the time to cook! =)

Questionnaires from people

As part of blog series or e-book compilations, people sometimes ask me to answer questionnaires they’ve put together. Sometimes they mention the size of their audience. Sometimes, they focus on our shared interests.

On one hand, it’s good that other people are putting together resources, and sometimes these things lead to interesting new conversations. On the other hand, grist for another’s mill, and I generally don’t enjoy reading short, too-standard answers.

So if I’m going to do stuff like that, I want to focus on the things I like. I never promise to write answers, and I don’t commit to a specific date. I mull over the questions and cherrypick the ones I find interesting. Not very generous of me, I suppose, but it keeps me happy. <laugh>

People are usually curious about the past: how one got started, what was helpful, what would you change. I tend to focus more on present and near-future, since that helps me a lot, and I’m not quite ready to hold my life up as an example that other people should be inspired by or follow. It’s good to take notes along the way, though, since it’s hard to reconstruct from memories afterwards.

So I’m okay with describing things and I can see the value of having a gallery of different approaches… What’s the core of this, then? Maybe I’m not keen on the Q-and-short-A format. Might as well be a sketch so that I can practise that. Might as well try to wring out ideas for the future, notes to self – which don’t make as much sense outside the context of my blog, I guess.

Hmm. I think there might be something there. In the context of my blog, it’s clearer that life is a work in progress, and people can come across updates. I can link to things back and forth, and it’s easier for me to keep track of comments.

I like it when people link to or excerpt my blog posts, since most of the time, bloggers make it easy to get back to the context. They put more of themselves into the post, too, sharing what they liked or what they think. It’s different from having a short bio at the end.

Oh! Maybe that’s something else that’s playing into this… I tend to feel meh about most of the guest posts I read, the generic-ish articles with short bios written for link-building and audience-building purposes. We might be a small tribe, but it’s okay for us to grow slowly through remarkable ideas rather than from exposure.

So I’ll still take people’s questions under advisement, but I’ll reflect on those questions on my own schedule and to the extent that I want to, and I’ll share those reflections on my blog. If people want to excerpt/link back, they’re welcome to do so. Let’s try that out…

Becoming a better reader

My particular weakness when it comes to reading is that I can end up skimming lots of books without deeply absorbing new insights or triggering new actions. I get practically all of my books from the library. I check their lists of new acquisitions (updated on the 15th of every month) and request all the titles that look interesting. Having gone through a huge number of books, I find myself less patient with books that don’t teach me something new, or at least say things in a more memorable way.

When do I get the most value from the books I read? How do I shift my reading to more of that?

2014-08-29 Becoming a better reader

2014-08-29 Becoming a better reader

E-books might  expand more of my reading time to the subway, displacing gaming time. If I read by topic instead of getting most things through new releases, then I’ll be reading more intentionally. What am I curious about these days? Skills, mostly, along with the occasional bit of personal finance and small business management. Those topics lend themselves easily to application and experimentation, so then I’ll learn even more from experience. I also enjoy coming across the context of familiar quotes and concepts, so that’s part of the reason why philosophy books are interesting for me.

I’ve got lots of notes that I haven’t turned into blog posts, experiments, and follow-up posts. I like how I’m starting to get a hang of the connections between books. Reviewing will help me connect those dots.

Maybe I should get back to sketchnoting some of the books I read – perhaps my favourites, as a way of sharing really good ideas…

Level up! Making IKEA-compatible shelves

2014-10-05 Routing shelves

We’ve been decluttering, moving things around and getting rid of things that no longer fit our life. W- decided to reorganize the downstairs cabinets, shuffling the supplies around so that the paper was closer to the printer. It made sense to add another shelf there. The cabinets had been discontinued, and W- couldn’t find shelves matching the dimensions we needed. Time to make our own!

W- picked up a long piece of pine from the hardware store and he cut it into three pieces. We went to IKEA to ask for more shelf pins, which they rustled up after lots of digging. Then we used the router (the woodworking one, not the networking one =) ) to carve out small indentations that would accommodate the pins. While I lined up the existing shelf as a guide, W- adjusted the piece of scrap wood that we were using as a fence and then clamped it into place. He rehearsed the cut, then routed the three boards. We repeated the process for the other indentations. Then we tested the boards – and they fit nicely. Now we’re varnishing them. We probably don’t need to varnish them, but we might as well. =) If we do another set — which we probably will — I’m looking forward to practising routing again.

Making shelves and varnishing them might be pretty small things, but it’s great to be able to do this. I like how W- is helping me learn all these practical skills. I’d love to learn more about building small and medium-sized things around the house: an open box for my cubby at Hacklab, some support for the kitchen shelf, a headboard, maybe even a study table. Someday!