October 2012

Weekly review: Week ending September 28, 2012

October 1, 2012 - Categories: weekly

My first week back from the trip was packed with lots of good stuff! Got everything important checked off. =) I nearly had a calendar mixup on Monday, but fortunately (a) my phone buzzed the reminder, and (b) the people I was going to meet could patch me in via Skype. Yay! I think that was because I hadn’t done my weekly review until Tuesday, so upcoming events weren’t on my radar. I’ll keep tweaking my calendar setup until reminders work well for me.

From last week’s plans

Business

  • [X] Earn: E1: Fix IE7 bug
  • [X] Earn: E1: Periodically check in to see if they’re doing okay
  • [X] Connect: Empty my inbox
  • [X] Connect: Debrief from QS conference
  • [X] Connect: Put together sketchnotes from conference
  • [X] Connect: Meet Gregor Bingham and consider personal coaching
  • [X] Connect: Take sketchnotes at Entrepreneurship 101 lecture series at MaRS
  • [X] Connect: Check in with project O
  • [X] Connect: Put together a Drupal prototype for the directory
  • [X] Build: Start SNA course at Coursera

Relationships

  • [X] Spend time with W-
  • [X] Catch up with the people I promised to catch up with
  • [X] Cuddle the cats!
  • [X] Give J- bento accessories and the purse Ching sent
  • Back to cooking, yay!

Life

  • [X] Re-enable my library requests
  • [X] Break out the cool-weather clothes
  • Got back to biking, yay!

Plans for next week

Business

  • [ ] Earn: E1: Consult (2 days a week)
  • [ ] Earn: Reconnect with Beverly regarding Hardlines talk
  • [ ] Connect: Attend Entrepreneurship 101 course at MaRS on Wednesday
  • [ ] Connect: Attend #torontob2b meetup on Thursday
  • [X] Connect: O: Add “zero out donation” feature”
  • [X] Connect: Attend WordCamp Toronto 2012 and share sketchnotes
  • [X] Connect: Clean up my address book and start organizing contacts
  • [ ] Build: Figure out if I can submit assignments to Coursera SNA course
  • [X] Build: Learn more about the Google Contacts API
  • [X] Build: Prepare for my first fiscal year end!

Relationships

  • [X] Enjoy anniversary dinner at Pho Hung
  • [X] Help clean the carpet
  • [ ] Cook a new recipe
  • [ ] Attend Eric Boyd’s housewarming
  • [ ] Get things ready for Dan’s visit

Life

  • [ ] Exercise (long walks, weights, monkey bars)
  • [X] Get back into the rhythm of using the library

Toolmaking

October 2, 2012 - Categories: reflection

My first full day back at consulting after a month-long vacation, and it felt great. I started digging into the REST API for the system we were using, and I figured out how to build a simple command-line client to get data. I’d built a similar community analysis tool while at IBM, and that one saved lots of people hours and hours of work. Since we were starting to need similar reports, it made sense to build a tool instead of manually crunching the numbers. This time,

I decided to build the tool using Ruby instead of Java, packaging it into an .exe with Ocra. I found Ruby to be much easier to write in. The interactive mode made it easy to prototype my ideas. Gems meant that I didn’t have to hunt all over for packages and figure out how to make them work together. It was fun to come up with more ideas and add them to the tool.

I love making tools. I like digging into the wires behind web-based services and making up new ways to use stuff. The value isn’t as visible or as easy to appreciate as, say, web design work, but it’s much easier to build something quick and then tweak it to fit specific people. I like that part a lot – tailoring tools to specific ways of working.

I was thinking about the different things I might like to be really, really good at in twenty years’ time. My current shortlist: writing, drawing (mostly sketchnotes), and toolmaking. I think writing and drawing are like toolmaking for me too. They’re about making tools for the mind, helping people learn faster or more effectively or about more things. =) Maybe if I practise and learn more about writing and drawing — the way I’ve spent most of my life programming — I’ll be able to make wonderful little things too.

Packing review: Things I used and didn’t use on my trip

October 3, 2012 - Categories: life

I was in California for two weeks: three days at a conference, a 5-day impromptu road trip to Disneyland in Anaheim, and a few days of hanging out at my sister’s or in San Francisco.

What worked well

Typing lots of notes from the organizers’ session: I used Google Docs to quickly type in and share my notes from the Quantified Self 2012 organizers’ meeting. Quite a few people came up to me and thanked me for the notes, including people who came in late. We didn’t have a projector, so I put the URL by the nametags instead.

Sketchnoting the plenary sessions on Autodesk Sketchbook Pro on my tablet PC: I took practically all of my sketchnotes on my Lenovo X220 Tablet PC. The extended battery meant that I never had to worry about finding a power outlet, which was great because I liked sitting in the front row. (You meet lots of interesting people there!)

The plenary sessions were fun to sketchnote, and it was great to be able to publish them straight to the conference blog (opening day 1, opening day 2, Ignite talks, closing) using my laptop. For the most part, the hour-long talks fit neatly on a single page. Awesome!

Vibram Five-finger toe shoes: Excellent for lots of walking during the conference and in Disneyland. No blisters or sore feet, and I didn’t have to wait for socks to dry.

Columbia zip-off pants: I turned these into shorts for Disneyland, which was great because there was a ton of running around in hot weather.

Anker external battery: Great for extending my phone’s battery life. I didn’t run out of juice during the trip.

A whiteboard marker: The breakout sessions were in rooms with wall-size whiteboards, but one of the rooms I was in didn’t have a whiteboard marker. Fortunately, I’d bought one for my kit. =)

What could be better

Taking text notes at the breakout: The conversation was going much too quickly to sketchnote. I could’ve followed Mark Carranza’s lead and taken text notes instead, which would have let me capture more organized information. (That Zoom recorder he uses might be interesting to try, too!)

Travel socks instead of cotton socks: Cotton socks take a long time to dry and are stiff after being hand-washed. I should have brought my Tilley travel socks to pair with my sneakers instead, as those dry overnight.

Didn’t use my tablet at the conference, but I brought it on the road trip: I bought the TF700 thinking I’d use it at conferences thanks to its longer battery life, but the Lenovo X220T lasted as long as I needed it to and I prefer drawing on the X220T’s screen. I like using the tablet at meetups around town, though, because that way I don’t have to bring my laptop. Sketchnotes on my X220T feel more polished because I have better drawing tools, but if I get used to using the tablet (maybe sketchnoting webinars?) or tweak my tablet style, then I might use it more often.

The tablet came in handy on the road trip, though. My sister gave me a small bag to pack things in, and the slim tablet fit with my clothes much better than the laptop would have.

Didn’t use the tablet dock at all: I thought I’d use this to give myself more battery life during the conference, but I ended up just using my tablet PC instead.

Didn’t meet up with many people: It was difficult to coordinate small get-togethers. I made it out to see a small bunch of Emacs people (who are awesome!), but that was about it. Part of this was because plans were up in the air. Maybe next trip, I’ll pick one or two days and focus on meeting people then.

Good trip!

Sketchnotes: ENT101: Lived It Lecture – Bruce Poon Tip (G Adventures) on Social Enterprise

October 3, 2012 - Categories: business, entrepreneurship, sketchnotes

Click on the image for a larger version of sketchnotes. This talk is part of the free MaRS Entrepreneurship 101 series (webcast and in-person session every Wednesday!)

Feel free to share this! You can credit it as (c) 2012 Sacha Chua under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Canada licence.

20121003 Entrepreneurship 101 - Lived It Lecture - Bruce Poon Tip - G-Adventures

Missed the first session? Check out my sketchnotes for Finding and Validating Your Idea (Keri Damen).

Liked these notes? They’re fun to do and I’m happy to share them. I learn, other people learn, everyone’s happy! If you want, you can set up some time for tea/hot chocolate/Skype/Google Hangout (or e-mail me your thoughts), tell me what you’re interested in, and help me in my quest to learn how to get really good at connecting the dots. =)

Looking forward to sharing more notes next week!

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Sketchnotes: #torontob2b: Free trials, cold-calling, brainstorming

October 5, 2012 - Categories: sketchnotes

Click on an image for a larger version of the sketchnotes. Feel free to share these! You can credit it as (c) 2012 Sacha Chua under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Canada licence.

How to create a free trial that works, Justin Norris

torontoB2B 20121004 How to create a free trial that works - Justin Norris

Successful telephone lead generation, Trevor Hamilton

torontoB2B 20121004 Successful telephone lead generation - Trevor Hamilton

Brainstorming, Marilyn Barefoot

torontoB2B 20121004 Brainstorming - Marilyn Barefoot

Learning how to bring people together

October 5, 2012 - Categories: connecting

Many people I know are looking for their next opportunity – freelancing, consulting, full-time or part-time jobs. One of my friends asked me if I could recommend any meetups that weren’t specifically about tech, but more like support groups for independent people. I couldn’t think of any close by, so I set up a get-together at a nearby cafe and invited a few people whom I knew were looking for stuff.

That was today at Red Bean Espresso, and it worked out wonderfully. I was a little worried about the politeness of holding space during the coffee rush hour of 4:30 or so, but things worked out decently, and we squeezed quite a few people around the large communal table there. I tipped the server extra; I think she was the only one running the whole show!

After we settled in, I confessed that I’m still learning how to bring people together and asked people for help figuring this out. We did a round of introductions where everyone shared what they needed help with and what they could help others with. It turns out that people sometimes have oddly synchronous needs and capabilities, things that I might never have found out about in one-on-one conversations or even mingling in groups of three or four at networking events. Things flowed from large conversations into smaller ones, people moved around, conversations reconfigured. It was awesome!

I’ve got another get-together to go to this evening — another friend’s housewarming — but I’m looking forward to following up on this event. I want to practise bringing people together and helping them. I want to learn how to connect the dots. =)

Weekly review: Week ending October 5, 2012

October 6, 2012 - Categories: weekly

Colder weather!

From last week’s plans

Business

  • [X] Earn: E1: Consult (2 days a week)
  • [-] Earn: Reconnect with Beverly regarding Hardlines talk
  • [X] Connect: Attend Entrepreneurship 101 course at MaRS on Wednesday
  • [X] Connect: Attend #torontob2b meetup on Thursday
  • [X] Connect: O: Add “zero out donation” feature”
  • [X] Connect: Attend WordCamp Toronto 2012 and share sketchnotes
  • [X] Connect: Clean up my address book and start organizing contacts
  • [C] Build: Figure out if I can submit assignments to Coursera SNA course
  • [X] Build: Learn more about the Google Contacts API
  • [X] Build: Prepare for my first fiscal year end!

Relationships

  • [X] Enjoy anniversary dinner at Pho Hung
  • [X] Help clean the carpet
  • [-] Cook a new recipe
  • [X] Attend Eric Boyd’s housewarming
  • [X] Get things ready for Dan’s visit
  • Host get-together for consultants/freelancers

Life

  • [X] Exercise (long walks, weights, monkey bars)
  • [X] Get back into the rhythm of using the library
  • Lots of drawing, yay!

Plans for next week

Business

  • [ ] Earn: E1: Consulting (4 days a week)
  • [ ] Earn: Reconnect with Beverly, start working on Hardlines talk
  • [ ] Connect: Sketchnote small business meetup at Toronto Reference Library
  • [ ] Connect: Sketchnote Entrepreneurship 101 at MaRS
  • [ ] Connect: Discuss sketchonets / Canadian securities education
  • [ ] Build: Work on lettering skills
  • [ ] Build: Check invoices, etc.

Relationships

  • [ ] Have Dan over!
  • [ ] Possibly get together for Micah’s birthday?

Life

  • [ ] Relax

Cameron Lewis at the Toronto Small Business Network meetup

October 9, 2012 - Categories: sketchnotes

The Toronto Public Library hosts monthly small business networking meetups at the Toronto Reference Library. Entrepreneurs share their stories and lessons learned. I like taking sketchnotes, so here they are! Click on the image for a larger version, and feel free to share with attribution.

ENT101: Startup Law 101: Legal Launchpad (Arshia Tabrizi)

October 10, 2012 - Categories: sketchnotes

Click on the image for a larger version of sketchnotes. This talk is part of the free MaRS Entrepreneurship 101 series (webcast and in-person session every Wednesday!)

Feel free to share this! You can credit it as (c) 2012 Sacha Chua under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Canada licence.

Arshia Tabrizi: Startup Law 101: Legal Launchpad – corporate organization, intellectual property, contracts

20121010 ent101 Startup Law 101 - Arshia Tabrizi

Check out my other ENT101 sketchnotes, or other sketchnotes and visual book notes!

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A long reflection on getting more out of each hour

October 14, 2012 - Categories: learning, reflection

One of the people I met through the MaRS Entrepreneurship 101 course asked me what brought me to the sessions, since it looked like I was doing well already.

I like going to tech and business meetups that have talks. I get so much more than most people do out of them, I think. For many people, presentations are like lottery tickets. Sometimes the talks are directly relevant to their work, and sometimes they aren’t. Sometimes they’re at the right level of experience, and other times, talks are too basic or too advanced for them. Sometimes an hour’s talk more than pays for itself. Many times, though, it’s an hour that they won’t get back. Their return on investment is highly variable.

I like getting multipliers of value out of my time. I spend the same hour that everyone spends listening. By taking notes, though, I make myself listen more actively, create something that I can use to trigger my memories, share with other people, and add more to my blog archive. I used to take a lot of text notes. Over the past two years, I’ve switched to taking more sketchnotes because:

So that gives me even more ways to get value from the time I have. Here’s the Evil Plan I shared in my e-mail response about why I go to the entrepreneurship course:

…I mainly attend for sketchnoting practice and long-term network building. Every session gives me exactly what I want: better real-time drawing skills, an excuse to delight and follow up with experts, stronger connections with event organizers and business resources, serendipitous encounters with potential entrepreneurs in person and online, the ability to give something to a pretty large audience, and material for blog posts and compilations. :) All for maybe two hours’ total investment of attention and a few subway tokens… As far as Evil Plans go, I suspect it’s a good one. ;) Five, ten, twenty years down the line, it will probably lead to something wonderful.

Some people are more productive because they require less sleep – my dad belongs to this category. Me, I like getting between 8-9 hours of sleep each night, averaging 8.3 hours over the past 321 days (standard deviation of 1.6 hours/day). That means I just have to get more value out of the time I have – not so much multi-tasking, but getting multiple kinds of value.

Right now, it’s easy to squeeze out more value from the dish sponge of life. I’m in the awesome part of the learning curve, where I’m getting tons of value out of going to things because I learn so much. When I hit the plateau of mediocrity, things might be different – or maybe I’ll get better and better at structuring things so I’m always getting lots of different kinds of value from the same hour: learning, skill-building, relationship-building, knowledge-sharing… In 2009 I wrote about how my interests complement each other, and the new ones I’m picking up – drawing, publishing, learning how to build a business – snap right into that framework. But there’s so much more to learn about learning and living. What can I possibly know even now, at 29, with so much more of life ahead? This is nothing, a tiny fraction of what’s possible. It’ll be wonderful to keep learning, to find out what it’s like to get even better at making the most of time. I’m looking forward to it. Any tips? Anything I can help other people learn?

Weekly review: Week ending October 12, 2012

October 15, 2012 - Categories: weekly

Friends from the Netherlands are over here, so it’s been pretty busy!

From last week’s plans

Business

  • [X] Earn: E1: Consulting (4 days a week)
  • [X] Earn: Reconnect with Beverly, start working on Hardlines talk
  • [X] Connect: Sketchnote small business meetup at Toronto Reference Library
  • [X] Connect: Sketchnote Entrepreneurship 101 at MaRS
  • [X] Connect: Discuss sketchonets / Canadian securities education
  • [-] Build: Work on lettering skills
  • [X] Build: Check invoices, etc.

Relationships

  • [X] Have Dan over!
  • [C] Possibly get together for Micah’s birthday?

Life

  • [X] Relax
  • Harvested parsley from garden

Plans for next week

Business

  • [ ] Earn: E1: Consulting (1 day a week)
  • [ ] Connect: Sketchnote Small Business Forum
  • [ ] Connect: Host Quantified Self Toronto meetup
  • [ ] Connect: Sketchnote Entrepreneurship 101
  • [ ] Build: Set up meeting regarding Entrepreneurship 101 PDF?
  • [ ] Build: Prepare templates for sketchnoting
  • [ ] Build: Work on lettering and typography
  • [ ] Build: Check out art classes
  • [X] Build: Order more sketchnoting resources
  • [X] Build: Register new domain names for business

Relationships

  • [ ] Have Dan over!
  • [ ] Recover =)
  • [ ] Get the house sorted out again
  • [ ] Sign up for Cantonese tutoring
  • [ ] Get ready for Saturday parties: David Ing, Eric Buchegger

Life

  • [ ] Harvest basil
  • [ ] Write long-delayed monthly review
  • [ ] Categorize topics

Sketchnotes: Quantified Self Conference 2012

October 16, 2012 - Categories: quantified, sketchnotes

Realized I didn’t post a copy of my Quantified Self conference sketchnotes on my own blog, just the quantifiedself.com blog. So here they are!

Quantified Self 2012 Opening Plenary

20120915 QS2012 Opening Plenary

Nancy Dougherty’s talk

20120915 Nancy Dougherty

Quantified Self 2012 – Ignite Talks for Day 1

20120915 quantified self ignite day 1

Notes from our session

20120915 quantified self show-and-tell session 1

Day 2 lunchtime ignite talks

20120916 qs2012 lunchtime ignites day 2

Opening plenary, day 2

20120916 qs2012 opening plenary

Day 2

20120915 Quantified Self Plenary

Kevin Kelly – closing plenary

20120916 closing plenary - Kevin Kelly

See my conference recap for more text notes.

Feel free to share these! (Creative Commons Attribution License)

Sketchnotes: Small Business Forum [Enterprise Toronto]

October 17, 2012 - Categories: entrepreneurship, sketchnotes

Click on the images to see larger versions. Enjoy!

Keynote: Dani Reiss, Canada Goose

20121016 Small Business Forum - Canada Goose - Dani Reiss

E-commerce in Canada – Drew Green

20121016 Small Business Forum - ECommerce in Canada - Drew Green

The Power of Networking Tactics – Bobby Umar

20121016 Small Business Forum - The Power of Networking Tactics - Bobby Umar

Find Customers, Keep Customers – Marie Wiese

20121016 Small Business Forum - Find Customers, Keep Customers - Marie Wiese

Open Rates, Clickthroughs & Conversions – Javed Khan

20121016 Small Business Forum - Open Rates, Clickthroughs, Conversions - Javed Khan

Closing panel: Where to Find the Funs to Grow – Marissa McTasney, Erica Ehm, Roy Pereira

20121016 Small Business Forum - Where to Find the Funds to Grow

Like these notes? Check out my other sketchnotes and visual book notes. If you’d like to find out whenever I post new business/tech-related sketchnotes (typically once a week), sign up for just sketchnote-related notifications or subscribe to my blog (includes other posts). Enjoy!

Monthly review: September 2012

October 17, 2012 - Categories: monthly, review

Last month, I wrote:

In September, I’m looking forward to spending time with
my parents, sister, and brother-in-law; sharing lots of sketchnotes
from the Quantified Self Conference; putting together an annual
review; and learning more about mobile development.

It was such a busy month thanks to the trip. I haven’t even gotten around to doing that annual review or organizing the pictures from the trip. I’m already halfway through October!

What will October look like? I took a month-long break from consulting in September, so I’m looking forward to getting back into the swing of things and helping my clients get ready for the next major milestones. There are quite a few events in October, so I’ll be getting lots of sketchnoting practice. In terms of skill-building, I want to focus on lettering and typography. I’d like to ramp up my delegation so that I can get more things done, too. I’m also looking forward to gathering the papers for my first business tax return and HST return, wow. =)

Blog index

Sketchnotes:

Quantified:

Travel:

Misc:

Reviews:

Sketchnotes: Different Types of Entrepreneurship, Kerri Golden, Allyson Hewitt (MaRS ENT101)

October 18, 2012 - Categories: entrepreneurship, sketchnotes

Click on the image for a larger version of sketchnotes. This talk is part of the free MaRS Entrepreneurship 101 series (webcast and in-person session every Wednesday).

Feel free to share this! You can credit it as (c) 2012 Sacha Chua under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Canada licence.

Different Types of Entrepreneurship, Kerri Golden, Allyson Hewitt (MaRS ENT101)

20121017 ENT101 - Different Types of Entrepreneurship - Kerri Golden, Allyson Hewitt

Check out my other ENT101 sketchnotes, or other sketchnotes and visual book notes!

(more…)

Planning for retirement when you don’t know where you’ll be

October 19, 2012 - Categories: finance, planning

I have several friends who’ve also moved to Canada from other places. One of them asked me how she could figure out how much money she’d need in retirement if she doesn’t know where she’s going to live and what the costs will be. Even at 29, I’ve spent some time planning for retirement, and here’s how I approach planning for retirement when I don’t know what’ll happen.

The most important thing to realize is that there isn’t just One Number. There are different possibilities depending on how much you save. I remember reading a personal finance book that suggested coming up with three numbers: how much you need for a bare-bones retirement, what you need for a comfortable retirement, and what you need for an awesome retirement. If you take the same idea and extend it to possibilities in different places, you can get a sense of what you might need.

It’s also good to know that those numbers will change. You’ll make different decisions. You might need more, you might need less. If you’re automatically saving 10%, maybe 20%, maybe even more, then you’ll most likely be in decent shape.

Still, numbers can be good for motivation! So, how do you get those numbers? I like starting with current dollars instead of inflation-adjusted numbers. It’s easy to find articles suggesting what you need to retire in different places. For example, this 2010 article says $800-1200/month is comfortable for expats, which probably means that number’s way over the top. =) I can probably get away with something like the amount I earned while teaching there, with something extra put aside for medical issues.

In Canada, I can estimate the minimum I need by looking at my expenses and finding out what else I might need to spend for, like medicines. I’m not counting on Old Age Security, the Canada Pension Plan, or other government programs – they’ll be a nice bonus if I get them, but I shouldn’t rely on them. That gives me a number for a basic retirement, and then I can come up with other numbers for more comfortable retirements.

When you look at retirement planning as a range of numbers instead of a single number that you have to make, it becomes easier to cheer yourself on. Then you have all these numbers, and you can estimate how much you need in today’s dollars when accounting for inflation and growth. You can see what possibilities are probably already available, and how far you are to your next threshold. You can think of it as getting to different levels in a game, or unlocking different achievements. As you save and invest, you open up more possibilities – and it’s great to know that your backup plan is well-covered.

Me, I’m inching towards my “very basic Canadian expenses covered” goal, knowing that I can likely retire to the Philippines if I want to. It’s pretty cool knowing this at 29, and it motivates me to save up more so that I could have a totally awesome retirement either in the Philippines or in Canada!

I’m not a financial advisor and this isn’t financial advice. I’d love to hear what you think, though!

Weekly review: Week ending October 19, 2012

October 21, 2012 - Categories: weekly

The Small Business Forum was fun to sketchnote. Did lots of good stuff at my consulting gig. Biked through the rain on Friday after a successful pub night experiment with Quantified Self Toronto. Lots of social get-togethers. Need to block off more time to recharge in quiet and solitude; looking forward to catching my breath after conference season winds up!

From last week’s plans

Business

  • [X] Earn: E1: Consulting (1 day a week)
  • [X] Connect: Sketchnote Small Business Forum
  • [X] Connect: Host Quantified Self Toronto meetup (had pub night, too)
  • [X] Connect: Sketchnote Entrepreneurship 101
  • [-] Build: Set up meeting regarding Entrepreneurship 101 PDF?
  • [X] Build: Prepare templates for sketchnoting
  • [-] Build: Work on lettering and typography
  • [X] Build: Check out art classes
  • [X] Build: Order more sketchnoting resources
  • [X] Build: Register new domain names for business
  • Build: Hired Linda for virtual assistance
  • Build: Listened to Ramit Sethi’s course through CreativeLive

Relationships

  • [X] Have Dan over!
  • [X] Recover =)
  • [X] Get the house sorted out again
  • [-] Sign up for Cantonese tutoring; postponed until I have more brainspace
  • [X] Get ready for Saturday parties: David Ing, Eric Buchegger

Life

  • [-] Harvest basil
  • [X] Write long-delayed monthly review
  • [-] Categorize topics
  • Biked in the rain!

Plans for next week

Business

  • [ ] Earn: E1: Consulting (2.5 days)
  • [ ] Connect: Sketchnote MaRS Entrepreneurship 101 course (Wed)
  • [ ] Connect: Sketchnote mobile business track at AndroidTO (Thu)
  • [ ] Connect: Sketchnote The Changing Nature of Influence meetup (Thu)
  • [ ] Connect: Sketchnote TEDxToronto (Fri)
  • [ ] Connect: Talk to QuantifiedSelf.com crew (Mon)
  • [ ] Connect: Order new business cards
  • [ ] Connect: Outline presentation
  • [ ] Build: Document my sketchnote process for post-conference follow-up
  • [ ] Build: Train Linda on post-conference follow-up process

Relationships

  • [ ] Send post-party thank you notes
  • [X] Help Rachel Lane paint
  • [X] Attend David Ing’s party
  • [X] Attend Eric Buchegger’s party
  • [X] Restocked freezer

Life

  • [X] Put away deck chairs
  • [ ] Analyze groceries / spending data
  • [ ] Harvest basil
  • [ ] Update categorical index

Celebrating my fiscal year end; planning how to improve

October 22, 2012 - Categories: business, entrepreneurship, planning

When I incorporated my business last February 19, I chose September 30 as my fiscal year end. I’d read a number of forum posts that recommended avoiding December 31 as the fiscal year end because accountants are swamped with personal and sole-proprietor tax returns. Picking September 30 meant that I’d have no problems finding an accountant for return preparation, and they might even have time to sit down and chat with me about tax planning.

I’m a bit of a personal finance geek, so I was glad to dig into the numbers for my own business. When I started the business, I talked to several accountants in the city. I think most expected me to turn up at year-end with a shoebox of crumpled receipts. Since I couldn’t stand the thought of waiting that long to find out what was going on with business, I purchased Quickbooks, scanned copies of all of my business receipts, typed in transactions, and hired a virtual bookkeeper/accountant who could answer my questions as I got things going. I liked working with her, so now I’ve asked her to take on more of the bookkeeping and to help me prepare the tax return. I think it’s made a huge difference in terms of my potential stress level around the fiscal year end. =)

We’ve been working on closing the files. My accountant was surprised at how low my expenses were. She’s been sending me questions like: Where are the rest of your bank fees? I only see $1.80. You should have entries for every month. What about TTC transit passes? I told her that since I was using RBC’s eBusiness bank account, I really did only have $1.80 in bank fees (deposited paper cheques), and that I’d been biking to work, so no transit passes either. (Except for the one in March, which I’ll probably claim as a personal tax credit.) She said that she thought she was frugal.

When I made the decision to leave the comfort of a large company for my own adventure, I expected to spend a few years building sweat equity – investing time into learning the things I need to learn while drawing on my savings. Clients talked me into consulting immediately. It’s been a thrill to be able to help both really big and really small organizations using a combination of different skills: from technical work such as Rails, Javascript, HTML, and CSS to soft skills such as enterprise social software adoption, and even newly-developed skills in illustration and animation.

I’ve far exceeded my initial financial projections, but I know it’s because I’ve been staying close to what’s familiar. My experience at IBM prepared me for consulting, and advice from mentors and friends helped me transition into independent practice; but there are other lessons I’m looking forward to learning as well. It just means that my 5-year-experiment is probably going to be a 7- or 10-year experiment!

So, the things I need to keep somewhere on my radar: taxes due by November 30, HST by December 31. I’ve set aside money to cover those expenses, so it’s all good. Actually, I haven’t taken any money out of the corporation yet, since I figured it was simplest to get things off the ground first and then introduce payroll or dividends in the following fiscal year. One step at a time!

In the meantime, I’m making myself spend more (and spend more wisely), learning how to substitute money for time through connection, tools/automation, training,  and delegation.

For example, I want to connect with other entrepreneurs and help them make things happen. I can wait for the Brownian motion of bumping into each other at tech events to gradually help me build that network. Or I can speed it up through lunches and coffees and follow-ups, especially if I take things beyond a perfunctory e-mail conversation and invest real time and energy (maybe even other people’s time and energy!) into helping people.

I want to try new tools to see which ones will support my workflow well. Sometimes that means paying for tools that turn out to be less than what I want, but the things I’ll gain from the tools that work out will more than pay for those.

I want to learn more about drawing, sales, business, and other skills that can help me make even more of a difference. I don’t want to just sign up for courses or coaching. I want to have a clear, action-oriented plan for implementing what I’m learning.

I want to learn how to delegate and to share the opportunities that come my way. That means that I’m going to slowly transition my processes over to other people, even if I think I can do it better or it doesn’t take me that much time to do it. I can always take those tasks back if I need to trim my budget, but if I can document my processes and learn how to take advantage of other people’s talents, I think I’ll be able to grow a lot more. Many entrepreneurs struggle with going beyond what they can do with their own time or talents. Knowing how to share the load – and better yet, building a network of people I can trust – is more than worth the investment. Besides, if I get better and better at delegation, and if I use that time productively, I can grow the business even more.

What can the 2012-2013 fiscal year for my business look like? I have four more months of consulting planned at three days a week (although I’m taking December off, so technically, that’s just three months of consulting). I have a professional speaking engagement in November. I’ve got the beginning of a possible business idea around sketchnotes, and I want to practise validating it. For that, I’m going to want to set up more lunches and start more e-mail conversations. And I’m going to follow up on that budget, seeing if I can invest money in growing.

Both business idea validation and investing in people/tools/processes involve risk. At the end of the next fiscal year, there’s a chance that my balance sheet will be slimmer – but also a good chance that I’ll have learned a lot along the way, and possibly at a rate cheaper than an MBA. Besides, who knows? I might turn those experiments into earnings too!

So that’s where I am and where I want to go. Thank you for being part of the adventure!

Planning how to learn about validating business ideas

October 23, 2012 - Categories: business, entrepreneurship, planning

I’ve been taking notes at business events and sharing them on my blog. People tell me that they really like the notes. They’re engaging, memorable, and easy to share. I want to see if I can start capturing and sharing paid events as well, eventually turning this into a visual communication business (sketchnotes! videos! workshops!) that could provide opportunities for other people to create value. Other people have built businesses around graphic recording and explainer videos, so why not?

What do I need to do in order to explore this? I need to find out:

So let’s start with a narrowly-defined niche. I want to focus only on business-related webinars, conferences, presentation series, and workshops, and only for companies whose messages I can stand behind. (No get-rich-quick schemes!) I might even scope that down further – drop workshops, because those are much more interactive.

Possible value proposition: Sketchnotes offer an engaging, visual way to follow up with leads and increase the reach of your content. They are easy to review and to share. (Hmm, can I start testing and quantifying these things?)

Instead of offering graphic facilitation, which tends to require a larger canvas for greater interactivity, I’ll offer digital sketchnotes on my tablet PC. The advantages: quick setup, no distractions away from the speaker, no materials cost or logistics (blank walls, etc.), quick turnaround – images are available the day after the event. If people want the visual impact of a 3’ or 4’ sketchnote mural, I can refer them to graphic recorders or facilitators who work in Toronto or elsewhere.

How can I go about exploring this idea?

If you put in the work of testing this idea and it works out well for you, fantastic! I think the world is big enough – and even if it turns out not to be, then you’ve done the hard work of validating the idea and making this happen, and I don’t need to. I can move on to the next business idea that I want to build. =)

Besides, by sharing, I’m probably going to run into way more people who are awesome and who can help me learn how to make things happen than people who want to just scoop the idea. See? I have perfectly selfish reasons for thinking out loud.

Pub nights and thinking about networking at events

October 23, 2012 - Categories: connecting

One of the lessons we took home from the Quantified Self Conference in September was the importance of a pub night for turning a meetup into a community. We tried it last Friday at our first post-conference meetup, squeezing twelve people around a long table at the Firkin on Yonge. I sprung for appetizers for the table and dinner for one of our attendees, who had driven for five hours from Detroit in order to join us. It turns out that three appetizers is too much for 12 people (some ordering food); next time, I’ll get one plate for every six people.

It was good to continue the conversation in a non-meetup context. I got to hear about people’s lives and even offer some help. I think it would be fun to get to know folks more. I wonder what ENT101 would be like with an informal pub night afterwards!

I really like the Quantified Self meetup. People are geeky in all sorts of different ways. I’ve taken on more of a hosting role, greeting people as they come in and checking with them after the event. It’s a good stretch, and I don’t feel as strong a need for introvert recharging after the meetup than, say, after parties or conferences.

I wonder what it is, and maybe if I can shift my experience at the other events I go to. I think part of it is the ease of introductions. With regulars, I don’t have to introduce myself, and I can ask about things we talked about before. With newcomers, I can quickly introduce myself as one of the organizers and ask them what got them interested in the group. At other events, I think I can take on the quasiofficial role of a sketchnote recorder.

Social get-togethers are still a little awkward, but that’s just more incentive to host them myself, so I can skip the introductions. Come to think of it, my tea parties are usually more about group conversations than about pairwise introductions… Hmm.

I liked supporting conversations with food. I should bring people together more often. I’m planning to have lunches and coffees more often, but I should also look into organizing communal get-togethers for coffee or dinner. We had 12 people in the coffee shop and I think that might be as large as I want to make it so that I can still listen to everyone. Maybe even six for dinner parties? We’ll see.

Quantified Awesome: Grocery update – Oct 2012

October 24, 2012 - Categories: quantified

I’d gotten into the habit of scanning my receipts and sending them over to one of my virtual assistants, but I hadn’t analyzed the numbers in a while. I finally sat down and spent 23 minutes categorizing the new items from the line-item breakdown of our receipts. With the categories in place, I could update my reports (another half-hour or so). So here we are – almost a half-year update.

image

That works out to an average of $395.36 per month (looking at May-September) for 2.7 people (W-, me, and J-, who spends weekends at her mom’s), or $146 per person. I think we eat quite well. Yummy lunches all ready to go, dinners at home, various favourites making their appearance, and even a party or two somewhere in there…

September is interesting – I was away for two weeks, and W- bought a lot of vegetables. Maybe if I let him take the lead in planning recipes and making a list, we’ll ramp up vegetable-eating again. =) It’s also interesting to see the regularity of our egg-buying patterns.

Here are the top 10 individual items in terms of money spent:

image

I’ve been curious about sale patterns and comparing prices between places. We get our lamb shanks from a butcher and they’re priced by weight, so I haven’t been tracking fluctuations. Organic milk is $9.99 except for that one time we tried a different brand that was on sale for $6.99. Shrimp prices vary a bit depending on the kind of shrimp; we now often get peeled shrimp for convenience. We switched from buying small $7.49 bags of brown rice to the bigger $14.99 bags (way more than twice the rice, although we have to get this from an Asian market). We’ve also upgraded from the small bag of sushi rice ($12.98) to the huge bag of sushi rice ($22.99). We used to be able to get chicken leg quarters for around $2.50 in May, but now they’re more like $4.5-$5.0 per package (can’t find the halal chicken leg quarters). Cherries started off at 4.34 a kilo, dipped to 3.24, went up to 4.34, and were at 2.14 in August. Extra large eggs are between $4.27 and $4.47. Mozzarella is $2.99 normally and $2.29 on sale.

In total, I’ve spent $10.98 on delegation (including bonuses) in order to get this data, and an hour here and there every time I want to crunch the numbers. =) Not bad. I like getting a sense of how we’re doing, and it will be interesting to see personal-scale inflation as the years go by.

Sketchnotes: #ENT101 Entrepreneurial Management–Jon E. Worren

October 24, 2012 - Categories: sketchnotes

This talk is part of the free MaRS Entrepreneurship 101 series (webcast and in-person session every Wednesday).

Feel free to share this! You can credit it as (c) 2012 Sacha Chua under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Canada licence.

Click on the image for a larger version of sketchnotes.

20121024 ENT101 Entrepreneurial Management - Jon E Worren

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Business card kaizen

October 25, 2012 - Categories: business, connecting, kaizen

I’m nearly out of business cards, so it’s time to think about how I want to redesign them. Business cards are nowhere near the heart of a business (sales! service!), but I like paying attention to the little things that can help me connect better with other people.

What do I use my business cards for? What do I want my business cards to do? Business cards are ostensibly so that people can get in touch with you. Many people tell me they’re terrible at following up with people after events. The only ones who seem to do so are the ones who collect business cards so that they can add you to their mailing list! I find it helpful to completely ignore the original purpose of business cards and take the initiative of following up with people myself. This works out much better than trusting that people will e-mail me or call me afterwards.

If I’m not giving people business cards in order for them to follow up with me, what benefit do I get from carrying around and giving out these little pieces of paper?

People usually exchange business cards in the middle or towards the end of a conversation. My business cards are good at adding an extra "bump" to the conversation – an additional spark of interest. People often remark on my picture and the keywords I use ("Tell me more about what an Enterprise 2.0 consultant does…" "Oh, what have you written?" "Ooh, storyteller. What’s with that?" "Oh, look, geek! Me too!"). Here’s where those conversations go:

I want my next set of business cards to continue sending those messages: I care about helping you remember me and continue the conversation, and I’m sure that conversation will be interesting.

Elements for the business card:

Possible additions: 2D barcode? Maybe – handy way to encode e-mail address, maybe vCard information. Takes up space, not sure if people use them.

I’d like to add a sketchnote similar to the one I have on my Twitter profile, but with a white background and more colours. This might be a good use of the back of the business card. It’ll be pretty sparse, so people can still use the back of the business card to write notes. My goal there would be to have an instant, portable demonstration of what I do, instead of fiddling with my smartphone or waiting for people to check out my website. Hmm, even maybe Moo’s Printfinity – I think that having unique designs on each card would make it even more fun to give out cards. I should try converting my sketchnotes to 1039×697 and printing them at 300dpi to see what they look like at that scale.

Frills: Raised print? Foil accents? Don’t need them. A heavier card stock would be nice. Rounded corners are tempting – they feel more modern, and the business card doesn’t get as worn in the pocket. It does break some people’s hack of dog-earing various corners of the business cards in order to remember to follow-up, though. Still possible, just harder.


Layout: I’ll continue with the horizontal layout, standard US business card size. I noticed that when I’m scanning business cards, vertical ones make me frown a little. Since I can’t stash oversized business cards and postcards in my business card holder, they’re harder to keep track of, and I don’t want other people to deal with the same issues. I’m definitely going with my own design. Like stock photography, template business cards are obviously template business cards, and I want to hack my cards so much more. =)

Number: I ordered 500 cards on March 25, 2008, which was around 4 years ago. I’d been using them more than IBM business cards even when I was at IBM, so it’s not like they were sitting in drawers. I’ve also used print-your-own business cards in order to test different concepts, such as putting networking tips on the back of the card or recommending favourite networking-related books for cards to give out after a presentation.

I’d like to replace my business cards in one year, because I’ll learn even more about business card design by then. I might even know more about what kind of business I’d like to explore! I should probably order 100 or 250 cards. I’ll be paying slightly more per card and more in shipping, so I should make sure that I’m learning a lot of things that I can fold into a my next design.

Slowly growing!

Sketchnotes: AndroidTO–The Business of Mobile

October 26, 2012 - Categories: sketchnotes

These sketchnotes are from the keynotes and Mobile Business track of AndroidTO 2012.

Feel free to share this! You can credit it as (c) 2012 Sacha Chua under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Canada licence.

Click on the image for a larger version of sketchnotes.

Design – Kim Pimmel

20121025 - AndroidTO 1 - Design - Kim Pimmel

How Wattpad’s Android User Base Drives Success – Allen Lau & Mike Beltzner

20121025 - AndroidTO 2 - How Wattpad’s Android User Base Drives Success - Allen Lau, Mike Beltzner

Good Privacy Practices for Developing Mobile Apps – Vance Lockton, Melanie Millar-Chapman

20121025 - AndroidTO 3 - Good Privacy Practices for Developing Mobile Apps - Vance Lockton, Melanie Millar-Chapman

The Secrets of Being a No1 App & Not Losing Money – Gary Yetin

20121025 - AndroidTO 4 - The Secrets of Being a N01 App and Not Losing Money – Gary Yentin

Mobile Apps: Web vs. Native – Anthony Kanfer

20121025 - AndroidTO 5 - Mobile Apps Web vs Native – Anthony Kanfer

I Wish I’d Known That When I Started – Chris Haseman

20121025 - AndroidTO 6 - I Wish I’d Known That When I Started – Chris Haseman

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#SMref panel: Changing Nature of Influence–Moderator: Terry Foster–Panel: Matt Juniper, Patrick Thoburn, Ron Nurwisah, Eric Alper

October 26, 2012 - Categories: sketchnotes

These are notes from the panel moderated by Terry Foster (Cision) on the changing nature of influence.

20121025 SMref unsigned

Check out the Twitter conversation for #SMref, or browse through more sketchnotes!

Weekly review: Week ending October 26, 2012

October 27, 2012 - Categories: weekly

Conference crunch! I’ve been sketchnoting so much, and people really like what I share. Onward and upward!

I’ve been increasing my delegation experiments. I think this will work out wonderfully. =)

From last week’s plans

Business

  • [X] Earn: E1: Consulting (2.5 days)
  • [X] Connect: Sketchnote MaRS Entrepreneurship 101 course (Wed)
  • [X] Connect: Sketchnote mobile business track at AndroidTO (Thu)
  • [X] Connect: Sketchnote The Changing Nature of Influence meetup (Thu)
  • [X] Connect: Sketchnote TEDxToronto (Fri)
  • [X] Connect: Talk to QuantifiedSelf.com crew (Mon)
  • [-] Connect: Order new business cards – found a stash of old cards!
  • [-] Connect: Outline presentation
  • [X] Build: Document my sketchnote process for post-conference follow-up
  • [X] Build: Train Linda on post-conference follow-up process
  • Connect: Reached out to Binaebi regarding sketchnoting as a business
  • Connect: Helped Bobby Umar with summarizing chat

Relationships

  • [-] Send post-party thank you notes – wrote them, stamped them, but haven’t dropped them into the mailbox!
  • [X] Help Rachel Lane paint
  • [X] Attend David Ing’s party
  • [X] Attend Eric Buchegger’s party
  • [X] Restocked freezer

Life

Plans for next week

Business

  • [ ] Earn: E1: Consulting (3 days)
  • [ ] Connect: Sketchnote The Business of Awesome (Mon)
  • [ ] Connect: Sketchnote Toronto Star Business Club event (Tue)
  • [ ] Connect: Sketchnote Startup Communities (Tue)
  • [ ] Connect: Sketchnote Entrepreneurship 101 (Wed)
  • [ ] Connect: Attend Startup Drinks (Wed)
  • [ ] Connect: Sketchnote WordCamp Developers (Fri, Sat?)
  • [ ] Build: Purchase TurboTax and give it a try
  • [ ] Build: Help Linda with post-sketchnote process
  • [ ] Build: Back up my files
  • [ ] Build: Perhaps find another accountant/bookkeeper who can doublecheck the work?

Relationships

  • [X] Get back into the swing of household routines
  • [ ] Attend Emma’s get-together
  • [ ] Set up regular get-togethers

Life

  • [ ] Work on art assignment
  • [ ] Set up sketchnote lessons?

Business adventures: Accounting

October 28, 2012 - Categories: business

One of the tough but crucial lessons in growing a business is learning when to part ways. I ended one of my oDesk arrangements with an accountant/bookkeeper when I realized I just wasn’t comfortable working with her. I’d had mixed feelings for a while, so I spent some time sitting down, reviewing her work, and trying to clarify things so that I could get the partnership back on the right track.

When I paid attention to how I felt and what I was worried about, I realized that I’d lost confidence in her and our working relationship, so it was better to make the transition. Fortunately, our digital workflow made it easy. I revoked her access to my shared Dropbox folder, ended the oDesk contract, unshared the password I’d given her through LastPass, and cancelled the authorization on file with the Canada Revenue Agency. It was much less awkward than arranging for the physical transfer of receipts might have been.

I don’t think I’ve learned enough from this to ace future hiring decisions. I’m glad that I set it up as a small, low-risk experiment, working with her for a few months instead of scrambling to find an accountant near my filing deadline. In the future, I might get better at figuring out people’s strengths and avoiding their weaknesses, and paying more attention to niggling doubts.

In the meantime, I want to make sure that I meet all the relevant tax deadlines, so I’ve been crunching the taxes myself. TurboTax turns out to be not that scary to use. I had to figure out the GIFI codes for tax-line mapping and I’m not entirely sure about some of them, but once I got that sorted out, TurboTax imported my Quickbooks transactions.

It’s a good thing I kept my first year of business fiscally simple: no dividends, no salary, no home-office deductions, no creative tax arrangements. I’m probably going to be paying more corporate income tax than I should and I’ll likely be audited at some point, but I think it all works out in the end. Next steps: get my web access code, confirm when I need to file taxes, and see about getting another accountant who can review my books.

Onward and upward (and maybe sideways)!

Sketchnotes: TEDxToronto 2012

October 29, 2012 - Categories: sketchnotes

These sketchnotes are from TEDxToronto 2012. The conference explores the theme of Alchemy.

Feel free to share this! You can credit it as (c) 2012 Sacha Chua under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Canada licence.

Click on the images for a larger version of my sketchnotes.

Vasiliki (Vass) Bednar, Ronald J. Deibert, Angie Draskovic, and

Ryan Henson Creighton & Cassandra Creighton

20121026 - TEDxToronto - 1 - Vass Bednar, Ronald J Deibert, Angie Draskovic, Ryan Henson Creighton and Cassandra Creighton

 

Marcelo da Luz, Isha Datar, Jon Dwyer, and Susur Lee

20121026 - TEDxToronto - 2 - Marcelo da Luz, Isha Datar, Jon Dwyer, Susur Lee

 

Dr. Joseph Calazzo, Sonya JF Barnett and Heather Jarvis, Shawn Micallef, and

Stéfan Danis

20121026 - TEDxToronto - 3 - Dr Joseph Calazzo, Sonya JF Barnett and Heather Jarvis, Shawn Micallef, Stefan Danis

 

Laura Reinsborough, Steven Page, Barbara Arrowsmith-Young

20121026 - TEDxToronto - 4 - Laura Reinsborough, Steven Page, Barbara Arrowsmith-Young

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Thinking about wild success

October 30, 2012 - Categories: business, entrepreneurship, planning

The more I explain this 5-year experiment to others, the more I understand it myself. =) I thought I’d spend some time thinking about what I wanted out of experiment and what wild success looks like, so that more people might be able to help me along the way.

I think the period of five years because it usually takes about that long before a business can be solidly established. Shorter, and I might mistake the fluctuations of figuring things out for long-term difficulties. Longer than that, and I might drift aimlessly without self-imposed goals or deadlines. Telling myself that I’ll take a close look at where I am and reevaluate my decisions in five years means that I can plan and budget for a fixed time period. Controlled uncertainty.

So where do I want to be on February 19, 2017, the 5th anniversary of starting my own business? What do I want to be able to say? What do I want to have done? Let me fast-forward to my future 34-year-old self and think about what that blog post might look like.

Here we are, five years after I started. I’ve learned a ton in the last five years. It turned out that making things happen isn’t anywhere nearly as scary as I thought it might be. I’m looking forward to bringing even more awesome ideas to life.

I’ve been so lucky to start with something that people immediately wanted and needed. Through consulting, I was able to help people take their businesses to the next level. I worked with amazing people who not only helped me take advantage of my skills and experiences, but also helped me develop new skills. We successfully transitioned all of my responsibilities, and they’ve turned that work into wild successes of their own.

Consulting allowed me to self-fund further experiments. I shared opportunities with other people, working with virtual assistants and other team members in order to get even more out of each day. In the course of training them to take over many of my processes, we built an operations manual that makes it even easier to bring new people on board. Many entrepreneurs’ growth is limited by their ability to trust and delegate, and by the network of people they have. Although I’ve also had my share of rough relationships, I’ve had the pleasure of building an amazing team with skills and passions that complement my own, and I reached out to an even wider network of people I can help and who can help me. Many of the people I’ve worked with have grown their own businesses into something they love doing.

Although I was tempted to continue consulting because it was familiar and comfortable, I eventually pushed myself to try other business models. I learned how to validate business ideas by talking to people and prototyping concepts, instead of simply building something and hoping people will come. It was also tempting to continue with the first new business as a job, but I pushed myself to grow out of it, bringing other people in so that they could make the most of those opportunities when I learned even more about creating businesses.

I learned so much along the way, and I’m glad I’ve been able to put them together in different books – at least one for every year of my experiment. I’ve shared what I learned about networking, productivity, delegation and automation, visual communication, entrepreneurship, business, and making things happen. Taking notes along the way really helped, and so did pushing myself to have interesting and novel experiences. I’m glad that so many people have found the books useful, and I’m sure my parents get a kick out of seeing me in print.

I’m now much more comfortable with reaching out to people and inviting them for lunch or coffee. I always learn lots of things in the conversations, and following up has become its own pleasure. I even host events so that I can bring people together.

In terms of paperwork, my attention to detail and comfort with numbers really paid off. The accountant helped me keep all of my books in order, and the CRA auditor found it easy to verify my records.

In my personal life, I continue to be the luckiest person in the world. W- is fantastic, and home life has somehow managed to keep getting better and better. We’ve got a solid financial foundation, and are excited about the possibilities.

What do the next five years hold for us? I’m not sure yet, but I’m sure it will be a good adventure.

My future 34-year-old self on Feb 19, 2017

We’ll see how it goes!

Sketchnotes: Startup Communities and Entrepreneurial Ecosystems

October 31, 2012 - Categories: sketchnotes

This is from Brad Feld‘s talk last night on Startup Communities and Entrepreneurial Ecosystems at the Toronto Reference Library.

Feel free to share this! You can credit it as (c) 2012 Sacha Chua under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Canada licence.

Click on the image for a larger version of my sketchnotes.

Startup Communities and Entrepreneurial Ecosystems – Brad Feld

20121030 Startup Communities and Entrepreneurial Ecosystems - Brad Feld

Check out my other sketchnotes and visual book notes!

I received a free ticket to attend the event. Thanks to Brad Feld, David Crow, William Mougayar, and the sponsors!

Sketchnotes: SOHO SME Expo 2012

October 31, 2012 - Categories: sketchnotes

These sketchnotes are from the SOHO SME Expo 2012. Unfortunately, I missed parts of the other sessions!

Feel free to share this! You can credit it as (c) 2012 Sacha Chua under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Canada licence.

Click on the images for a larger version of my sketchnotes.

Come One, Come All: Proven Tactics to Help Win New Customers – Alex Ciancio

20121030 SME2012 - Come One, Come All - Proven Tactics to Help Win New Customers - Alex Ciancio

Tools, Strategies & Best Practices to Optimize Your Online Presence – Moderator: Dave Forde; Speakers: Jeff Quipp, Paul Tobey, and Mike Agerbo

20121030 SOHO SME - Tools, Strategies, and Best Practices to Optimize Your Online Presence - David Forde, Jeff Quipp, Paul Tobey, Mike Agerbo

Content Strategy – The Foundation of SEO and Social Media – Jeff Quipp

20121030 SME2012 Content Marketing - Jeff Quipp

See what others are saying about #sme2012.

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